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  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10590 - December 15, 2021, 01:00 PM


    ...   https://twitter.com/DrPhilipWood

    well Modern times.,  everything goes on Twitter history ., you can learn history on the origins of religions/faiths in few words through twitter messages/responses

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b81L6WeS1JQ
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5FDtc9vC2lE

      It is ALL WILL OF ALLAH that made Philip Wood a Historian through   Agha Khan University .,   Philip Wood is doing good Job., But Agha Khan did a better Job and Saudi Arabia .. along with AMERICA OIL CONSUMPTION did much much  better job on history of Islam and on the Origins of Quran by funding university departments of History

    Well Agha Khan University is not good enough  for Phillip to Jump up the ladder in the field of Islamic history .,   May be Philip Wood can learn some Islamic history from this fellow called Dr Ejaz Akram.   who is now heading the newly established BIZZARE Pakistan religious institution called  Rehmatul-lil-Aalameen Authority ., as if LAND DOES NOT HAVE ENOUGH ISLAMIC LEARNING/EXPLAORING CENTER., Every street in Pakistan has a center for learning Islam  .
    ,So I would suggest to Phillip  to learn Islamic history from Dr Ejaz Akram  and Prime Minister Imran Khan ., For that  Dr, Phillip Wood  should apply for a job under  Dr Ejaz Akram ., that  will certainly make Phillip a real historian on  a global scale .,

    here are the contact information and Videos of Dr Ejaz Akram., who is  the PRESENT HEAD OF Rehmatul-lil-Aalameen Authority

    Quote


    Well if Philip wood need more help on applying for Job under Dr Ejaz Akram., he can join this forum
     

    Do not let silence become your legacy.. Question everything   
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10591 - December 17, 2021, 09:20 AM

    Altara, how are you


    Fine thank you.

    Quote
    The Quranic authors and the audience had to have a deep knowledge of Christian stories in order to compose the text, but most important to understand it properly.


    It is what (rightfully) Dye says in his paper about more the authors than the audience.  In fact, he has many difficulties to speak about both. He is unable to describe, and identified them precisely. I am able to do it. I know (for me... and I shall not telling it here) who are the authors and the audience. Of course, to be able to do it,  I set aside all the Mecca/Kaba frame. Whatever he thinks, Dye is obliged to follow it because it is risky (for his job, life) to do the contrary.  All academics are trapped. As I said he is obliged to separate the writing of the text because of the absence of Christianity in 'Mecca' as he considers (rightfully) that  (some parts, not all) of the text address Christians. Therefore he put the writing in Palestine after the conquest.
    Quote
    So it is right that the text was written for Christianized Arabs.

    Of course.
    Quote
    About the rest I see your point.

    Good.

    Quote
    The qur'anic texts could be composed anywhere, if the sources to compose it are either available in the memory of the author(s) or if the author(s) could access material to get their inspiration.

    (For me...) it is the second option.

    Quote
    What I wonder is why we have Christianized Arabs from north (Edessa) to south (Persian Gulf), and Dye ignores them pointing to Palestine. Surah Miriam? Kathisma?


    Because he wants to follow the Muslim narrative (as he is more or less obliged to do so ) i.e, the line of the conquest: from Mecca/Kaba to Palestine. As we have much more data about Palestine before Islam, we suppose that it is not surely there that Islam has emerged. Thus Palestine cannot be suspected to be the place where Islam has emerged. Whereas Iraq where the data are less clear, allows us to think so. Dye wants/is obliged to follow the narrative.
    The Kathisma stuff he developed serves his Palestinian narrative. Yet, it is  (for me...),refutable: the Kathisma pilgrimage was very famous and brought many people from all the Orient. It was not stuck to Palestine place and people. Therefore the Quranic  traditions (Q19) could have been written elsewhere than Palestine. So the link between 'Palestine' as such and the traditions developed in the Quran is not at all (for me...) granted.

    Quote
    All these places may have been the final intended audience of the text. As you pointed out it does not look like to be a coincidence that the texts appear in the hands of Arabs arriving from Iraq to Palestine 

    1/ That's correct.
    2/ To my knowledge, I'm the only one to say this. It is a clear departure from the Mecca/Kaba traditional narrative.


    Quote
    I was recently working on one of your points
    When we argue that the Quran has nothing to do with Mecca/Medina/Zam Zam/companions and that we must move out from west Arabia, then we are in areas with higher scribal presence.

     
    That's correct.
    Quote
    Therefore a man called Muhammad, preaching Allah for 22 years would not have escaped the writings of Jews or Christians or others.


    It seems plausible that he "would not have escaped the writings of Jews or Christians or others.".


    Quote
    I was wondering- How can we demonstrate that such an individual would not have escaped this? - And assuming the story of Islamic tradition is false, we may wonder if the Quran could originate by the hand of a simple preacher who did not operate for 22 years and did not wage any war nor any other peculiar action, but in a way more limited way. How do we know that a more simple situation could not actually escape from being put down into paper/rock or else


    It is a rationale, logical deduction grounded with what we know of the Orient of Late Antiquity.  The Biblical God speaking to someone and that event does not spread one way or another? It does not appears to me really plausible, considering the supposed 'Muslim' conquest as depicted by the Muslim narrative.

    Quote
    It can be easily demonstrated that Ibn Ishaq work is hagiography, but its core, a man preaching for a more limited time and without the exaggerated political and military role as depicted by Islamic sources may have existed.


    Why not. Where preaching such an event, to be totally unknown by the sources? The event is so great (direct live with the God of Abraham) that it does not seems plausible to me, having a good knowledge of Late Antiquity.

    Quote
    Your point is clear that any of the supposed early witnesses of Muhammad is no more than Arabs reading the Quran who spoke of Muhammad to others who thought that he was real.
    Indeed the line here in thin (for me)


    When did you see Moses the last time?  Jesus? Yet, they are names from books/texts repeated by others that you trust, pronounced every day during 2000 years.  It is exactly the same thing. There has been a 'prophet', an Arab one, it is what people believe in the 7th c. because of Quranic texts, nothing else. Nobody saw him, ate with him, spoke with him, ride with him, etc. There is nothing. The sole 'connection' is to be the nephews of the 'prophet'  wife (Zubayr family, rival of Abd al Malik) and saying holding the 'place of the Prophet' (Mecca/Kaba) that nobody knew before. Nobody. The inventor of Mecca/Kaba is Zubayr, the so called nephew of the wife. And all of this is drawn from the narrative allusions of the Quran: Makka/kaba/wife.


    Quote
    I hope my question is clear. I am trying to understand what was the capacity of writers/scribes etc.. of 550 to 650 to catch news of what was happening and put them on paper or onto any other document. (Paper I mean write them down...)


    Their capacity is the one of their contemporaries scribes who wrote many books.

    Quote
    Of course if we can demonstrate that most of these preachers, no matter how relevant they were, more or less they were reported in chronicles, then we can argue that someone who composed the Quran and preached it must have been recorded somewhere, and if he was not, then he did not exist
    Thanks


    There is the work of Epiphanius of Salamis (d.403). He recorded many people.  I add that there is no inscription of a 'prophet' speaking to God, etc., before Islam, there is nothing. I add again that nobody has preached the Quran publicly like the narrative says it. Re read the Quran, and search to what specific public he was destined.




  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10592 - December 18, 2021, 08:16 PM

    Wow, Robert Hoyland has recently been interviewed on MythVision Podcast!
    I still haven't seen it, but here it is:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JrIWap1kNG4
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10593 - December 19, 2021, 04:49 AM

    Wow, Robert Hoyland has recently been interviewed on MythVision Podcast!
    I still haven't seen it, but here it is:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JrIWap1kNG4

    well I watched that casually., The conclusion is .,  that MythVision guy asking probing questions and . Robert   Hoyland   TRYING HIS BEST TO EAVDE AND ESCAPE QUETIONS    Cheesy ..... that is my conclusion ., the problems with Academics exploring faiths  specially Islam is

    1).  Their own earlier pubs/books

    2).  what Altara said in his above post at https://www.councilofexmuslims.com/index.php?topic=27568.msg892471#msg892471

    Do not let silence become your legacy.. Question everything   
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10594 - December 23, 2021, 07:48 AM

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qgYMuRqXPr0

    hmm,  let me put that here.,   and watch it later. ,it is about Quran

    But  Not sure  why   Jordan  Peterson choose a FOOL  for his  Podcast -


    Do not let silence become your legacy.. Question everything   
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10595 - December 23, 2021, 09:30 PM

    Charles Tieszen - review of Shoemaker's A Prophet Has Appeared: The Rise of Islam through Christian and Jewish Eyes

    https://www.tandfonline.com/eprint/3A9WENTIBM5VW9MBFER6/full?target=10.1080/09596410.2021.1988260
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10596 - December 24, 2021, 10:17 AM

    Charles Tieszen - review of Shoemaker's A Prophet Has Appeared: The Rise of Islam through Christian and Jewish Eyes

    https://www.tandfonline.com/eprint/3A9WENTIBM5VW9MBFER6/full?target=10.1080/09596410.2021.1988260

    another wonderful book from Shoemaker.., in fact all his books are  Fantastic  he is a terrific writer who does in depth research before publishing a book . thanks for that review link zeca..

    Quote


    all those 5 books from him are Hollywood movie material ., 
    Quote
    A Prophet Has Appeared is a kind of documentary complement to studies like Patricia Crone’s and Michael Cook’s Hagarism1 – Shoemaker dedicates his book to Crone and discusses Hagarism in his introduction – that try to depict the early history of Islam from non-Muslim sources.

     

     I am very  glad to read this  from that Charles Tieszen  review of that book ., And all those early sources  from Non-Muslims on Prophet of Islam  are very much Questionable ...  but good one to read

    anyways., this is what is there inside that  250 pages or so  book

    Quote
    Table of Contents]/u]

    Acknowledgments

    Introduction

    1 The Teaching of Jacob the Newly Baptized

    2 Synodical Letter, Homily on the Nativity, and Homily on Epiphany
    Sophronius of Jerusalem

    3 A Syriac Fragment Concerning the Believers' Invasion of Syria

    4 Letter 14
    Maximus the Confessor

    5 Chronicle
    Thomas the Presbyter

    6 The Armenian Chronicle of 661 attributed to Sebeos

    7 The Spiritual Meadow, Appendix to the Georgian Version
    John Moschus

    8 Homily on the End-Times
    Ps.-Ephrem the Syrian

    9 Letter 14C
    Isho?yahb III of Adiabene

    10 Edifying Tales, Homily on the Lord’s Passion, The Hodegos, and Questions and Answers
    Anastasius of Sinai

    11 The Khuzistan Chronicle

    12 The Apocalypse of Rabbi Shim?on b. Yohai, The Secrets of Rabbi Shim?on b. Yohai

    13 Pirqe de-Rabbi Eliezer 30

    14 The Maronite Chronicle

    15 On the Holy Places
    Adomnán / Arculf

    16 The Apocalypse of Ps.-Shenoute

    17 The Book of Main Points
    John Bar Penkaye

    18 Fourth Letter to John the Stylite
    Jacob of Edessa

    19 The Passion of Peter of Capitolias

    20 Excerpts from a Lost Seventh-Century Greek Source,
    The Chronicle of Theophanes, The Chronicle of Agapius,
    The Chronicle of Michael the Syrian, and The Chronicle of 1234

    Notes
    Bibliography
    Index


    There is a lesson for those who write books on these faiths and faith origins  on " HOW TO WRITE BOOKS ON EARLY ISLAM" or for that matter on any faith/religion  ... you don't need a 1000 page single book in these modern times

    Do not let silence become your legacy.. Question everything   
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10597 - December 25, 2021, 08:46 AM

    another wonderful book from Shoemaker.., in fact all his books are  Fantastic  he is a terrific writer who does in depth research before publishing a book . thanks for that review link zeca..

    all those 5 books from him are Hollywood movie material .,   


    He also wrote an article on Christmas in the Qur'an
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10598 - December 27, 2021, 07:39 AM

    He also wrote an article on Christmas in the Qur'an

    yes.. yes ., I am glad you pointed that out., that was published Jerusalem in 2003.,  looong long ago,., we know lot more  about Quran chapters/manuscripts origins now than at that time., 20 years ago it was a very good publication ., And zeca I wonder any other historians explored that subject after or before that publication in a peer reviewed journals ?

    I guess after him the other link you gave in that folder is the work of Guillaume Dye and was published in 2015.,

    I think the surahs of Quran   with   names  such as ...Maryam... Ibrahim...Yusuf .....Yunus....Muhammad....  etc .. seem to give an idea that there is some history in those verses of those chapters and their origins ..  who wrote them and who put them in to the book

    with best wishes and happy holidays
    yeezevee

    Do not let silence become your legacy.. Question everything   
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10599 - January 05, 2022, 06:18 PM

    Thread: https://twitter.com/abhistoria/status/1478745882879266816
    Quote
    I'm preparing a grant proposal for a project on the Qurʾan. It picks up where Patrica Crone left off. For a while I disliked the work of Crone. Now  I am in awe of her. Crone was misunderstood. In what follows I collate her answers to questions she frequently encountered.

  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10600 - January 06, 2022, 11:14 AM

    Quote

    I'm preparing a grant proposal for a project on the Qurʾan. It picks up where Patrica Crone left off. For a while I disliked the work of Crone. Now  I am in awe of her. Crone was misunderstood. In what follows I collate her answers to questions she frequently encountered. 1/

       Cheesy Cheesy   oh boy   that is from  Jan 5, 2022·Twitter Web App by  Prof. Ahab Bdaiwi

    Quote
    Curriculum vitae
    Dr. A. Bdaiwi studied at the Universities of London and Exeter, and received his PhD in Arabic and Islamic Intellectual History from the University of Exeter (2014). He spent three years as a lecturer in Islamic and Iranian intellectual history at the University of St Andrews (2013-2016). In January 2016 he was Visiting Scholar of Medieval Studies at the College of William and Mary. Since August 2016 he is Assistant Professor of Medieval Arabic Philosophy and Islamic Intellectual History at Leiden University. He is also a member of the Leiden University Centre for the Study of Islam and Society (LUCIS) and founder of the Leiden University Shiʿi Studies Initiative (LUSSI).

    Teaching activities
    I teach the following courses at undergraduate (BA) level: History of Philosophy, Introduction to Medieval Philosophy, Introduction to Shiʿi Islam, Classical Readings in Arabic, Medieval Islam History, Academic Skills, Modes of Knowing in Medieval Islam, and Medieval Arabic Philosophy.


    well I am glad ., it only took him 10 years to say  that at  dr. Crone., But I am not sure you need a million dollar grant to pick  up where Patrica Crone left off

    anyways  zeca picked up that tweet from here  https://threadreaderapp.com/user/abhistoria

    Quote
    Did Crone think Islam was original?
    She thought its teachings were both endogenous and exogenous. All ideas are influenced by context. She disliked term "borrowing" but preferred "intertextual". Islam inherited ideas from the past, but how it appropriated them was original. 

      Did Crone think believers and confessional types make good academic scholars? 
    Yes. She admired confessional biblical scholars. Faith, she said, "is about the transcendent, not open to empirical enquiry."  Crone disliked those who ground their faith in history, particularly to corroborate dogmatic view on the basis of history. That was bad scholarship in her view. 

      Did Crone change her views over the course of her career?
     Yes. A few examples. She once believed the Qurʾan was made up of multiple texts collected from different times (before and after Islam). She abandoned that view later. 

      When did Crone think the Qurʾan was compiled? 
    She believed a complete text was compiled in the mid. seventh century. But the text then is not identical to the text we have today. There are minor variations. 

      Did Crone agree with the mainstream view before her that Arabia was a pagan backwater?
    She abandoned that view after 1999. She later believed the Meccan pagans were less polytheistic and more monotheistic than Muslim accounts paint them. 

      Did Crone think the Qurʾan was a violent book?
     She imagined it was before writing her entry on War in the Qurʾan. She later stated she was surprised to learn the Qurʾan was less belligerent than its late antique environment.  Crone explained that, "the blood-curdling" verses in the Qurʾan, the combative verses, that is, were meant to mobilise believers to self-defence -- rather than legislate for war. 

      Was Crone aware many Muslims disliked her?
    Yes. She once described herself as the "bete noir" of the believers, writing, "they see me as engaged in a crusade against Islam, which is not at all the case".  Crone dismissed charges of Islamophobia, stating, "I am simply a historian interested in the secular question of how a new religion arose. I do not believe that God is speaking in the Qurʾan or anywhere else in the world historical literature." 

      Did religion carry any utility in Crone's view?
     Yes. But it is separate from academic discourse. She wrote, "Even if I privately believed that God has inspired this or that religion, I could not use this belief in my historical research." 

      What about believers of religions discredited by historians?
    She stated, "...but the fact that the Bible is not a reliable historical record does not mean that people should stop believing in Judaism or Christianity, and the same applies to Islam."   

      Are some Muslim justified in hating Patrica Crone?
    Crone answers, "If I were a Muslim committed to the traditional structures of authority, I would also be violently opposed to someone like myself. But in terms of belief, history is neither here nor there." FIN.


    so that is the story on that tweet but I am not sure  Dr. A. Bdaiwi know that HER LIFE WAS THREATENED BY HEREOS ISLAM IN AMRIKA......

    Do not let silence become your legacy.. Question everything   
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10601 - January 06, 2022, 08:19 PM

    Gabriel Said Reynolds with the syllabus for his Islamic Origins class

    https://www.academia.edu/67067775/Syllabus_Islamic_Origins_Notre_Dame_Spring_2022
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10602 - January 06, 2022, 08:22 PM

    Emran El-Badawi - Readings of the Qur’an from outside the tradition

    https://www.academia.edu/50409975/Readings_of_the_Qur_an_from_outside_the_tradition
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10603 - January 07, 2022, 06:22 PM

    Guillaume Dye - Concepts and Methods in the Study of the Qur’ān

    https://www.mdpi.com/2077-1444/12/8/599/htm
    Quote
    This paper addresses methodological issues in Qur’anic studies. At first, it intends to explain, through historiographical analysis, why methods proved fruitful in biblical and New Testament studies, such as form criticism and redaction criticism, have been disregarded in Qur’anic studies; secondly, it vindicates the application of such methods to the Qur’anic corpus; thirdly, it tries to exemplify the relevance of redaction criticism through examples. Two main issues are then discussed: the best way to account for the “synoptic problem” (the presence, in the Qur’ān, of variant parallel narratives), through an examination of some aspects of the Adam-Iblīs narratives (more precisely the composition of Q 2:30–38 and the nature of the relations between Q 38:71–85 and Q 15:26–43); and the beginning of Q 55. Two main conclusions are reached: first, the later versions of a parallel story are, in the examples discussed here, rewritings of earlier stories (namely, re-compositions based on a written version); second, sura 55 features the intervention of different authors, with two different profiles.


    (from Re-Interpreting the Qur’an in the 21st Century)
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10604 - January 07, 2022, 10:41 PM

    Real Talk with Robert G. Hoyland: History Writing in the Time of Islam's Beginnings
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4pIpvd3xjJk
    Quote
    What appears to be an absence of history writing for roughly the first century and a half following the advent of Islam is the subject of much interest among modern historians in the field of Islamic Studies. Most of the intrigue is from the simple fact that the earliest we have of historical memory only appeared in writing no less than 150 years after the events they narrate. Amongst some, it is commonly held that historical knowledge in the early Muslim community was transmitted solely through the basis of another vehicle; though some still find it unsatisfactory, and hard to believe, that during the formative years of Islams ascendancy, the early Muslims composed not a single text recording any of their major events. But was that actually the case, that no historical works were composed at any extent, and that the early Muslim community was one where historical knowledge was solely transmitted through a different means of communication before being put to writing in the middle of the 2nd/8th century?

    In this episode of Real Talk with Terron Poole, Dr. Robert G. Hoyland is joining me to discuss the topic of history writing in the time of Islams beginnings, based on his paper by the same title: https://www.academia.edu/48927537/History_Writing_in_the_Time_of_Islams_Beginnings

  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10605 - January 08, 2022, 01:43 PM

    Podcast: Revealing Arabia with Robert Hoyland

    https://barakat.org/latest-news/robert-hoyland-revealing-arabia/
    Quote
    Professor Robert Hoyland takes us on a journey through time to discover the ancient Arabian Peninsula, evidencing a much more multi-cultural and cosmopolitan world than what it is often imagined.

  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10606 - January 09, 2022, 10:30 AM

    Thread: https://twitter.com/DanielABeck9/status/1479834582333616129
    Quote
    One of the best books in Quranic Studies in recent years is Zishan Ghaffar's superb analysis of middle Meccan surahs and their relation to contemporaneous imperial politics and eschatology. Being super expensive and in German has kept its profile low.

    Quote
    Why is Ghaffar's book so brilliant? Many reasons, but chief is that is a systematic analysis of *exactly* how the "Meccan" ideology relates to contemporary imperial politics and propaganda. Rather than denying that close relation, or deeming it post-prophetic.

  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10607 - January 11, 2022, 01:15 AM

    Robert Hoyland: Late Antiquity and the Origins of Islam
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s7-Zzk1Rp-o
    Quote
    In this video I have the pleasure of sitting down with scholar and friend, Professor Robert Hoyland. Professor Hoyland is the Professor of Late Antiquity and Muslim History at New York University's Institute for the Study of the Ancient World. He read Oriental Studies at Oxford University. He is the author of many important works in Islamic Studies including, Islam as Others Saw It and In God's Path.

    Today we discuss Robert's entry into the field, the historical environment around the origins of Islam, the development of the Arabic language, and the development of debates in the field of Islamic Studies.

    *We came across a few technical difficulties while recording. In case you may find some of the audio at certain points hard to understand, I have added captions for the interview. So please turn them on if you need. *

  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10608 - January 12, 2022, 11:58 AM

    Zellentin, Review of Qur’anic Research : Zishan Ahmad GHAFFAR
    Der Koran in seinem religions- und weltgeschichtlichen Kontext: Eschatologie und Apokalyptik in den mittelmekkanischen Suren  Leiden: Ferdinand Schöningh / Brill, 2020  Pp. x + 270


    https://lockwoodonlinejournals.com/index.php/rqr/article/view/548/413

    "The discipline of Islamic studies has of course carefully (and sometimes not so carefully) considered the overall military and socio-economic impact of the Byzantine-Sasanian war on the formation of the Rāshidūn Caliphate that emerged after the war ended.
    Yet the discipline of Qurʾānic Studies proper, with a few noteworthy exceptions, has tended to relegate the clash of empires that occurred in the days of Muḥammad’s Meccan mission to the to the very margins of its interests."

    Logical as they are all but historians.

    "Namely, Ghaffar offers historical specificity without taking explicit recourse to traditional Islamic historiography".

    Too bad, it's in German...
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10609 - January 20, 2022, 11:41 PM

    Podcast: https://byzantiumandfriends.podbean.com/e/63-the-religion-of-simple-believers-with-jack-tannous/
    Quote
    The religion of simple believers, with Jack Tannous

    A conversation with Jack Tannous (Princeton University) about the "simple believers" who made up the majority of the population of Byzantium (as well as the caliphate and just about any premodern monotheistic society). They probably knew little about the minutiae of theology, but what did they know about their faith, and how important was theology for their religious identity? The discussion is based on Jack's recent book The Making of the Medieval Middle East: Religion, Society, and Simple Believers (Princeton University Press, 2018), which highlights the role of religious practice and interpersonal attachments.

  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10610 - January 20, 2022, 11:52 PM

    Gabriel Said Reynolds  IQSA 2021 Talk: Reported Speech in the Qur'an
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kMAII9quv7o
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10611 - January 23, 2022, 05:54 PM

    Eleonore Cellard - The Sanʿaʾ Palimpsest: Materializing the Codices

    https://www.academia.edu/68162838/The_Sanʿaʾ_Palimpsest_Materializing_the_Codices
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10612 - January 24, 2022, 02:02 PM

    Eleonore Cellard - The Sanʿaʾ Palimpsest: Materializing the Codices

    https://www.academia.edu/68162838/The_Sanʿaʾ_Palimpsest_Materializing_the_Codices

    I casually read through that  Eleonore's  "Sanʿaʾ Palimpsest" pub., that is a good one., thank you zeca 
     and I wonder whether you have collected list of  publications that deals with these "Sanʿaʾ Palimpsest" ? If you did., I would appreciate such list..






    Do not let silence become your legacy.. Question everything   
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10613 - January 30, 2022, 10:44 AM

    well I guess No one cares about origins of Quran the boo and the Quran manuscripts before manuscripts  became book ., but every one writes  on some Quran verses by picking and choosing few words/verses here and there from the book .. In fact many Muslim and Non-Muslim intellectuals wrote 1000 s such books and publications on Pick/choose Quran verses..

    well here is one such book



    you can read the book./excerpts in these pdf files

    https://securitypolicylaw.syr.edu/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/MyersJoseph.Quranic-Concept-of-War.pdf

    https://archive.org/details/thequranicconceptofwarskmalik

    I too have not red that book .. let me read that and figure out what verses he choose to write that book., and that book was written by Brigadier General, S. K. Malik ; foreword by General President da..da... M. Zia-ul-Haq .

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/S._K._Malik
    https://twitter.com/brigskmalik


     

    Do not let silence become your legacy.. Question everything   
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10614 - January 31, 2022, 03:51 PM

    Happy new Year to Everybody

    how are you all?

    I managed to download the PDF of  Zishan Ahmad GHAFFAR
    Der Koran in seinem religions- und weltgeschichtlichen Kontext: Eschatologie und Apokalyptik in den mittelmekkanischen Suren  Leiden: Ferdinand Schöningh / Brill, 2020  Pp. x + 270

    here is the link

    https://pdfrock.com/compress-pdf.html?queue_id=61f80242421873dc1d8b456a

    Zellenting article is not clear.
    Of course he somehow prises the text, but I still feel some disconfort.
    In the beginnign he refers to a book as not referring explicitly to the Islamic historiography, but in the end it ends up to confirm the Islamic chronology somehow.

    Anyway, Altara, if you had a chance to read it, what parts are more fruitfull to read? Just for my non-trained prospective so I know  where may I raise my attention.
    OF course the book must be read without "mekka, medina, muhammad, companions etc.."

    thanks
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10615 - January 31, 2022, 05:19 PM

    ...

    I managed to download the PDF of  Zishan Ahmad GHAFFAR
    Der Koran in seinem religions- und weltgeschichtlichen Kontext: Eschatologie und Apokalyptik in den mittelmekkanischen Suren  Leiden: Ferdinand Schöningh / Brill, 2020  Pp. x + 270

    here is the link

    https://pdfrock.com/compress-pdf.html?queue_id=61f80242421873dc1d8b456a

    Zellenting article is not clear.
    ....................
    OF course the book must be read without "mekka, medina, muhammad, companions etc.."

    thanks

    hi Spaghettibologn., that link is not working.. is that link contains  a translated(English) version of that  book?

    Quote
    Inhalt
    1 Die spätantike Kontextualisierung der koranischen Verkündigung
    und das historische Plausibilitätskriterium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
    1.1 Die religionspolitische Bedeutung der Eroberung Jerusalems
    durch die Perser 614 n. Chr.: Eschatologie, Apokalyptik und
    Messianismus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
    2 Q 17:4-8 – Die eschatologische Dekontextualisierung des Tempels . . . 15
    3 Q 19:1-33 – Die bundestheologische Bedeutung des Tempels
    und die Mutter des Messias . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
    3.1 Barmherzigkeitstheologie als Gegenentwurf zur Apokalyptik
    und imperialer Eschatologie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
    4 Q 38:17-40 – David und Salomo – Ewige Königsherrschaft und
    messianische Ahnherren? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
    4.1 Die davidischen Silberteller und die religionspolitische
    Bedeutung von Q 38:17-40 zu Beginn des siebten Jahrhunderts . . . 68
    5 Q 27:15-44 – Die eschatologische Herrschergestalt und der gläubige
    Herrscher: Salomo, Königin von Saba und Alexander . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
    5.1 Apokalyptisches Chaos vs. göttlicher Kosmos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
    5.2 Der eschatologische oder der gläubige Herrscher? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
    5.3 Die Einführung der Basmala-Formel und die Zurückweisung
    einer imperial-messianischen Christologie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
    6 Q 18 – Eschatologisches Wissen und eschatologische Zeit . . . . . . . . . . 111
    6.1 Exkurs: Datierung der syrischen Alexanderlegende und
    des Alexanderlieds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156
    7 Q 30:2-7 – Reichseschatologische Verheißung? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167
    7.1 Ex eventu: Der Sieg von Byzanz als Sieg der Gläubigen? . . . . . . . . . 179
    8 Q 21 – Die Theologie göttlicher Verheißungen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187
    8.1 Literarkritik . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 203
    8.1.1 Versabteilungsdifferenzen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 204
    8.1.2 Textkritik . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 205
    8.2 Komposition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 207
    Zishan Ahmad Ghaffar - 978-3-657-70432-3
    Downloaded from Schoeningh.de04/19/2021 05:36:22PM
    via Staatsbibliothek Zu Berlin
    x Inhalt
    8.3 Kursorischer Verskommentar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 209
    8.4 Analyse und Deutung . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 242
    8.4.1 Entwicklungsgeschichtliche Einordnung. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 242
    8.4.2 Inhalt und Struktur. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 242
    8.4.3 Sprecher-Hörer-Interaktion/Autorisierungen. . . . . . . . . . . . 250
    9 Muhammad und Herakleios als Typos und Antitypos und die Wende
    der Verkündigung in Medina. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 253
    Literaturverzeichnis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 259


    Do not let silence become your legacy.. Question everything   
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10616 - February 01, 2022, 08:21 AM

    Hi Yeezevee

    if the link is not working (it works from my station)
    here is my cloud

    https://drive.google.com/file/d/1N_i6Q3G1I63y6Avm7bSHOgdX8YNJP5gt/view?usp=sharing

    you can dowload it, the link is open
    it is in german, english is not available

    it is a plain and easy German (not like Kerr articles)
    I think that if you use Deepl as suggested by Altara you can get a reliable translation

    I am going to read it in next days.
    I was hoping in some suggestions from Altara where to raise my attention.



  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10617 - February 01, 2022, 12:01 PM

    Hi Yeezevee

    if the link is not working (it works from my station)
    here is my cloud

    https://drive.google.com/file/d/1N_i6Q3G1I63y6Avm7bSHOgdX8YNJP5gt/view?usp=sharing

    you can dowload it, the link is open

    thanks I could get through that

    Quote
    I was hoping in some suggestions from Altara where to raise my attention.


    well I was hoping for some published paper/book from his hand., but he is so busy .. he just does not know what ideas from his brain need to put where........  BUT I MUST SAY .. HIS IDEAS ON EARLY ISLAM/BIRTH OF ISLAM   AND ORIGINS OF QURAN ARE  ORIGINAL  AND FANTASTIC .. I hope to read something from him soon

    Do not let silence become your legacy.. Question everything   
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10618 - February 01, 2022, 06:37 PM

    Stephen J. Shoemaker is going to be interviewed by Derek Lambert. This could be interesting, but I hope he has a better microphone than Robert Hoyland (maybe his wage is to low?? I don't know what a professor earns. Maybe we should start a collection for him??)
    https://twitter.com/DerekPodcast/status/1488309896642764805
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10619 - February 02, 2022, 04:30 PM

    So here's Stephen Shoemaker on Derek Lambert's Mythvision podcast.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_jOAhI6oP80
    Quote
    The oldest Islamic biography of Muhammad, written in the mid-eighth century, relates that the prophet died at Medina in 632, while earlier and more numerous Jewish, Christian, Samaritan, and even Islamic sources indicate that Muhammad survived to lead the conquest of Palestine, beginning in 634-35. Although this discrepancy has been known for several decades, Stephen J. Shoemaker here writes the first systematic study of the various traditions.

    Using methods and perspectives borrowed from biblical studies, Shoemaker concludes that these reports of Muhammad's leadership during the Palestinian invasion likely preserve an early Islamic tradition that was later revised to meet the needs of a changing Islamic self-identity. Muhammad and his followers appear to have expected the world to end in the immediate future, perhaps even in their own lifetimes, Shoemaker contends. When the eschatological Hour failed to arrive on schedule and continued to be deferred to an ever more distant point, the meaning of Muhammad's message and the faith that he established needed to be fundamentally rethought by his early followers.

    Dr. Stephen J. Shoemaker Books
    https://www.amazon.com/Stephen-J-Shoe...

    Dr. Shoemaker’s website
    https://www.stephen-shoemaker.com/?page_id=148

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