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Theme Changer

 Topic: Maryam Rajavi and the MEK

 (Read 3002 times)
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  • Maryam Rajavi and the MEK
     Reply #30 - February 14, 2021, 02:47 PM

    OK.. let me give this video of that Australian guy..on MEK

    https://www.dailymotion.com/video/x6pxjbf

    please watch it...


    Thanks for that Yeez.
  • Maryam Rajavi and the MEK
     Reply #31 - February 15, 2021, 10:35 AM

    This is odd. MEK funding the Spanish far right party Vox, or being used as a conduit for funding.

    https://foreignpolicy.com/2019/04/27/spains-vox-party-hates-muslims-except-the-ones-who-fund-it-mek-ncri-maryam-rajavi-pmoi-vidal-quadras-abascal/
    Quote
    Given Vox’s staunch Islamophobia, it was an embarrassment for the party when reports of Iranian funding emerged in January. Vox’s racist, homophobic, and sexist policies had already provided plenty of ammunition for its critics and rival parties; the claims that Vox had been established with the help of Iranian money in 2013 was less expected. However, Vox was not actually funded by Iran itself. The reality is even more surprising.

    Documents leaked to the Spanish newspaper El País show that almost 1 million euros donated to Vox between its founding in December 2013 and the European Parliament elections in May 2014 came via supporters of the National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI), an exiled Iranian group. The NCRI was set up in the 1980s by Mojahedin-e-Khalq (MEK) and a number of other Iranian dissidents and opposition groups. The MEK’s allies later abandoned the NCRI, making the organization functionally an alias for the MEK.

    Quote
    “Mojahedin [MEK] are the tool, not the funders. They aren’t that big. They facilitate,” said Massoud Khodabandeh, who once served in the MEK’s security department; Khodabandeh defected in 1996, a year before the MEK was designated by the U.S. State Department as a terrorist organization. “You look at it and say, ‘Oh, Mojahedin are funding [Vox].’ No, they are not. The ones that are funding that party are funding Mojahedin as well.”

    Khodabandeh said he himself was involved in moving money for the MEK and its funders during the reign of Saddam Hussein. “I went to Riyadh and recovered three trucks of gold bars from agents of [the] Saudi intelligence agency [at that time] led by Prince Turki bin Faisal. We transferred them to Baghdad and then to Jordan. We sold the bars in Jordan,” he claimed.

    Khodabandeh’s account raises the question of where the MEK’s money is coming from today. Heyrani, the recent MEK defector, also handled parts of the organization’s finances in Iraq and was blunt when asked about the current financial backing of the MEK: “Saudi Arabia. Without a doubt,” he said. Once the MEK was given a safe haven in Albania after U.S. withdrawal from Iraq, with no U.S. Army to defend the group’s camp and the Iraqi government wanting them gone, one of the ranking members of the political department told Heyrani that Saudi Prince Turki bin Faisal Al Saud had finally laid a “golden egg.”

    The so-called egg was the massive installation, or camp, based just outside Tirana, Albania, which has been used by the MEK as its base of operations since 2016. “Habib Rezaei [a top-ranking member] told me that we will bring some U.S. senators to parade in front of Albanians so that they know who they’re dealing with,” Heyrani said. (In August 2017, Republican Sens. Roy Blunt, John Cornyn, and Thom Tillis visited the MEK in Albania and met with Maryam Rajavi.)

    Saudi Arabia’s state-run television channels have given friendly coverage to the MEK, and Prince Turki al-Faisal, Saudi Arabia’s former intelligence chief, even appeared in July 2016 at an MEK rally in Paris. “I want to topple the regime too,” the prince said, to cheers. It has also been widely reported that the MEK has collaborated with Israel’s Mossad, including in attacks against Iranian nuclear scientists, according to U.S. officials. The MEK has called the allegations of their role in assassinating Iranian nuclear scientists “patently false.”

    There is evidence that Gulf leaders, fearful of Iranian influence and Islamist movements at home, are warming to anti-Islam parties in Europe, as Ola Salem and Hassan Hassan have argued in Foreign Policy. Khodabandeh agreed. “It’s all over Europe,” he said. “Far-right, anti-EU parties have support that comes from lots of places. … There is outside backing. This backing is the same as [those backing] MEK.”

  • Maryam Rajavi and the MEK
     Reply #32 - February 15, 2021, 10:46 AM

     
       https://foreignpolicy.com/author/sohail-jannessari/

    RUBBISH   and your trust that guy  Sohail Jannessari??

     https://twitter.com/sohailjannesari?lang=en

    Why That lady needs  funding from Spanish far right party Vox??  does not Juicily JUICE .. AMRIKA CIA.. ARABIAN KINGS have no money to support her cause fighting or overthrowing the mullah regime in Iran??

    Do not let silence become your legacy.. Question everything   
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Maryam Rajavi and the MEK
     Reply #33 - February 15, 2021, 10:50 AM

    Why That lady needs  funding from Spanish far right party Vox??  does not Juicily JUICE .. AMRIKA CIA.. ARABIAN KINGS have no money to support her cause fighting or overthrowing the mullah regime in Iran??


    MEK funded Vox, not the other way round. This has been widely reported.
  • Maryam Rajavi and the MEK
     Reply #34 - February 15, 2021, 10:56 AM

    https://english.elpais.com/elpais/2020/01/28/inenglish/1580198751_981994.html
    Quote
    Two lawmakers for Spain’s far-right Vox, Santiago Abascal and Iván Espinosa de los Monteros, received party salaries for eight months that drew on funds from donations by the National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI), sources have told EL PAÍS.

    Both leaders received around €65,000 in total. The NCRI had an armed wing that was on the United States’ list of terrorist organizations until 2012, a year before the group funded Spain’s ultra-nationalist party.

    Vox, which is now the third-largest force inside the Spanish parliament with 52 lawmakers, was created in 2013 with around €1 million donated by the NCRI. On December 17 of that year, the day that it was registered as a new party on the Interior Ministry’s records, Vox received its first transfer from abroad by sympathizers of the Iranian exiles. The transfer was in the amount of €1,156.22.

    A month after that, then-secretary general Santiago Abascal and senior official Iván Espinosa de los Monteros began earning salaries paid for by the opponents of the Iranian regime. The money reached Vox thanks to the mediation of Alejo Vidal-Quadras, the party’s original founder and first president. Abascal’s monthly salary was fixed at net €3,570 (€5,000 before taxes), which he received between February and October 2014, for a total of €40,000.

    Quote
    In total, the ultra-nationalist party received €971,890.56 between December 2013 and April 2014. The money funded the 2014 European election campaign as well as various party expenses ranging from the rent on the party’s first headquarters on Diego de León street in Madrid to furniture and computer equipment.

    In order to raise this amount, the NCRI sent out 35 collectors around the world: money was obtained from around a thousand supporters in cities and neighborhoods of around 15 countries, including Germany, Italy, Switzerland, Canada and the United States. Most of these contributions were anonymous, and the donors’ identities did not show up in the records of the bank account that Vox opened at a Catalan lender. This information did not appear in the party’s internal accounts, either. But the accounts do show the names of the 141 individuals who transferred the money.

  • Maryam Rajavi and the MEK
     Reply #35 - February 15, 2021, 11:15 AM

    MEK funded Vox, not the other way round. This has been widely reported.

    MEK seems to have dollar.pound printing press,    Did it also fund Donald Trump  through some Italian Mafia Liers??

    and why do you trust that guy   Sohail Jannessari??

    Do not let silence become your legacy.. Question everything   
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Maryam Rajavi and the MEK
     Reply #36 - February 15, 2021, 11:22 AM

    If you actually read the report it explains that the MEK appears to be being used for channelling money from the Saudis.
  • Maryam Rajavi and the MEK
     Reply #37 - February 15, 2021, 11:34 AM

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/stories-50339928
    Quote
    For six years, Albania has been home to one of Iran's main opposition groups, the Mujahideen-e-Khalq, or MEK. But hundreds of members have walked out - some complaining about the organisation's rigid rules enforcing celibacy, and control over contact with family. Now, dozens languish in the Albanian capital, Tirana, unable to return to Iran or get on with their lives.

    "I didn't speak to my wife and son for over 37 years - they thought I'd died. But I told them, 'No, I'm alive, I'm living in Albania…' They cried."

    That first contact by phone with his family after so many years was difficult for Gholam Mirzai, too. He is 60, and absconded two years ago from the MEK's military-style encampment outside Tirana.

    Now he scrapes by in the city, full of regrets and accused by his former Mujahideen comrades of spying for their sworn enemy, the government of the Islamic Republic of Iran.
    [...]
    Gholam Mirzai was serving in the Iranian military when he was captured by Saddam Hussein's forces at the start of that conflict. He spent eight years as a prisoner of war in Iraq. But in time, Iranian prisoners like Mirzai were encouraged to join forces with their compatriots. And that is what he did.

    Mirzai is now a "disassociate" - one of hundreds of former MEK members who have left the organisation since they moved to Albania. With the help of funds from family, some have paid people smugglers to take them elsewhere in Europe, and perhaps two have made it back to Iran. But dozens remain in Tirana, stateless and officially unable to work.
    [...]
    For the MEK, Albania was a completely new environment. Gholam Mirzai was astonished that even children had mobile phones. And because some of the Mujahideen were initially accommodated in apartment buildings on the edge of the capital, the organisation's grip on its members was looser than it had been previously. In Iraq, it had controlled every aspect of their lives, but here, temporarily, there was a chance to exercise a degree of freedom.

    "There was some rough ground behind the flats where the commanders told us we should take daily exercise," remembers Hassan Heyrany, another "disassociate".

    Heyrany and his colleagues used the cover of trees and bushes to sneak around to the internet cafe close by and make contact with their families.

    "When we were in Iraq, if you wanted to phone home, the MEK called you weak - we had no relationship with our families," he says. "But when we came to Tirana, we found the internet for personal use."
    [...]
    Hassan Heyrany does not buy it any more. Last year he left the MEK, rejecting what he saw as the leadership's oppressive control of his private life. Heyrany had joined the Mujahideen in his 20s, attracted by its commitment to political pluralism.

    "It was very attractive. But if you believe in democracy, you cannot suppress the soul of your members," he says.

    The nadir of Heyrany's life with the MEK was an evening meeting he was obliged to attend.

    "We had a little notebook, and if we had any sexual moments we should write them down. For example, 'Today, in the morning, I had an erection.'"

    Romantic relationships and marriage are prohibited by the MEK. It was not always like that - parents and their children used to join the Mujahideen. But after the bloody defeat of one MEK offensive by the Iranians, the leadership argued it had happened because the Mujahideen were distracted by personal relationships. Mass divorce followed. Children were sent away - often to foster homes in Europe - and single MEK members pledged to stay that way.

    In that notebook, Heyrany says they also had to write any personal daydreams.

    "For example, 'When I saw a baby on television, I had a feeling that I wished to have a child or a family of my own.'"

    And the Mujahideen had to read from their notebooks in front of their commander and comrades at the daily meeting.

    "That's very hard for a person," Heyrany says.

    Now he likens the MEK camp in Manze to Animal Farm, George Orwell's critique of the Stalinist era in the USSR. "It's a cult," he says simply.
    [...]
    Now both men are focused on the future. With help from family in Iran, Heyrany is opening a coffee shop, and he is dating an Albanian. At 40, he is younger than most of his fellow cadres and he remains optimistic.

    Gholam Mirzai's situation is more precarious. His health is not good - he walks with a limp after being caught in one of the bombardments of the MEK camp in Iraq - and he is short of money.

    He is tormented by the mistakes he has made in his life - and something he found out when he first got in touch with his family.

    When Mirzai left to go to war against Iraq in 1980, he had a one-month-old son. After the Iran/Iraq war ended, his wife and other members of his family came to the MEK camp in Iraq to look for Mirzai. But the MEK sent them away, and told him nothing about their visit.

    This 60-year-old man never knew he was a much-missed father and husband until he made that first call home after 37 years.

    "They didn't tell me that my family came searching for me in Iraq. They didn't tell me anything about my wife and son," he says.

    "All of these years I thought about my wife and son. Maybe they died in the war… I just didn't know."

    The son he has not seen in the flesh since he was a tiny baby is nearly 40 now. And Mirzai proudly displays a picture of this grown-up man on his WhatsApp id. But renewed contact has been painful too.

    "I was responsible for this situation - the separation. I can't sleep too much at night because I think about them. I'm always nervous, angry. I am ashamed of myself," Mirzai says.

    Shame is not easy to live with. And he has only one desire now.

    "I want to go back to Iran, to live with my wife and son. That is my wish."

    Gholam Mirzai has visited the Iranian Embassy in Tirana to ask for help, and his family have lobbied the authorities in Tehran. He has heard nothing. So he waits - without citizenship, without a passport, and dreaming of home.








  • Maryam Rajavi and the MEK
     Reply #38 - February 15, 2021, 01:44 PM

    If you actually read the report it explains that the MEK appears to be being used for channelling money from the Saudis.

    why MEK need to channel money  from Saudis to   some Spanish  far-right Vox,??  Can't they the Saudis directly money transfer to Spanish  far-right Vox,??

    I just do not get the logic here..

     Is National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI) also fighting in Spain.??, Albania?? and all over middle east  for Saudis.. USA CIA .. Israel Mossad..Huh?   etc etc  and being communist origin., it  must also be having connections with KGB  and controlling Putin?? ...  .. and and MEK is also running   UN  with this lady Maryam  being a Poster child for all these mafias.....

    Is that what that guy  Sohail Jannessari   is trying to say there in the link of your post dear zeca??   DO YOU KNOW HIM??

    Do not let silence become your legacy.. Question everything   
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Maryam Rajavi and the MEK
     Reply #39 - February 15, 2021, 02:03 PM

    why MEK need to channel money  from Saudis to   some Spanish  far-right Vox,??  Can't they the Saudis directly money transfer to Spanish  far-right Vox,??


    Your guess is as good as mine.
  • Maryam Rajavi and the MEK
     Reply #40 - February 15, 2021, 02:13 PM

    Your guess is as good as mine.


    How about guessing  THESE IDIOTS ARE TRYING TO PUT HER DOWN OR EVEN ELIMINATE HER??

    dear zeca.. do you even think a bit about that far-right Vox of Spanish is FULL OF ISLAM HATERS?? and why would this lady supports Islam haters .. that too being a Muslim.,

    so now she is blasphemy supporter hence there should be a fatwah against her from some Mullah of Iran... how about that..

    Propaganda works...

    Do not let silence become your legacy.. Question everything   
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Maryam Rajavi and the MEK
     Reply #41 - February 15, 2021, 03:08 PM

    No one is even denying that they have funded Vox.
  • Maryam Rajavi and the Spain’s far-right Vox
     Reply #42 - February 15, 2021, 03:48 PM

    No one is even denying that they have funded Vox.


    WHY DON'T YOU WRITE AGAINST IT??  and do you know who this guy is??

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gW_z90bWas4

    zeca you  have a problem with   Maryam Rajavi  and her work?? 

     or you have problem with MEK party??

    And you are OK with Iranian Mullah regime...??

    did i get that right??  you clearly focusing on this issue in in this forum...

    Do not let silence become your legacy.. Question everything   
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Maryam Rajavi and the MEK
     Reply #43 - February 15, 2021, 04:30 PM

    It says that he’s a journalist with El País.
  • Maryam Rajavi and the MEK
     Reply #44 - February 15, 2021, 05:05 PM

    It says that he’s a journalist with El País.

    well they are all journalists now a days ., and pay bit of money they will write against their mothers ...

    and I asked this Q
        https://foreignpolicy.com/author/sohail-jannessari/

    RUBBISH  and your trust that guy  Sohail Jannessari??
     

     and you also know that guy  Sohail Jannessari??.. who is also a journalist...  Or it says ... he is journalist ...

    But if you think she......Maryam...... is a problem for Iran and its people and its future...  YOU MUST HAVE FREEDOM TO GO AGAINST HER ..

    anyways  I have lot more stuff on my plate which are difficult to eat and digest.. so i will be off  from here.. and My only wish is .. CEMB will not create problems to her to have  fatwa on her head.. and hope is her own supporters cow her down..

    oh well it is life,,,,

    Do not let silence become your legacy.. Question everything   
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Maryam Rajavi and the MEK
     Reply #45 - February 15, 2021, 05:08 PM

    https://www.vice.com/en/article/yw443y/a-former-mek-member-discusses-the-extremist-iranian-cult
    Quote
    In 1979, Masoud Banisadr was a young postgraduate math student at Newcastle University, watching political upheaval in his homeland of Iran on the nightly news. Wanting to play his part in a new society after the fall of the Western-backed Shah, he joined Mujahedin-e-Khalq (MEK), an Islamic Marxist revolutionary organization.

    But a couple of years after the revolution, the MEK began to clash with Ayatollah Khomeini's theocratic regime and were soon deemed an enemy of the new Iran. MEK suicide bombings and assassinations followed. In 1981, thousands of MEK members went into exile, and by 1986 had established a tight-knit paramilitary organization in Iraq led by the husband-and-wife team of Masoud and Maryam Rajavi.

    Banisadr became the MEK's PR man, trying to win over Western politicians and moving between Camp Ashraf (their headquarters in Iraq), Geneva, and Washington, DC. He finally left the group in 1996, went into hiding, and now lives in England.

    The United States removed MEK from its list of terrorist organizations in 2012, but Banisadr still considers it a fanatical cult acting under the warped leadership of the Rajavis. He argues that any terrorist organization is either a cult or "has no option but to become one in order to survive."

    I spoke to Banisadr about the power of cults and how this might help us understand why young men in the West are vulnerable to joining the Islamic State and other extremist groups.

    VICE: You were once a high-ranking member of MEK. Why do you now see the organization as a cult?

    Masoud Banisadr:There was a charismatic leader, Rajavi. There was a black-and-white worldview imposed: followers cutting themselves off from family, followers losing their personality. There was mind manipulation. At Camp Ashraf in Iraq there were talks lasting for days on end. I remember one task where we had to write down our old personality in one column on a board, and the new personality in a different column. I remember a guy who said, "My brother works in the Iranian embassy in London. Before I loved him as my brother, now I hate him as my enemy. I am ready to kill him tomorrow, if necessary." And everyone applauded.

    How did you justify violence?

    I was fortunate not to be involved in any violence. But all group members accepted MEK suicide bombings and killings in Iran to be revolutionary acts. This was the brainwashing. And later, in my role as official representative, I would justify and explain these acts as the only means we had to defend ourselves. I was a nice person, well mannered, and could argue very rationally with politicians. So I was a good salesman.

    Why did MEK members divorce their wives?

    In 1990, Rajavi said all members must divorce their spouses. My own wife had already left the group by then. All members accepted these terms, and it [applied to] everyone except the leader and his wife Maryam. In a single day, everyone became celibate. Someone asked, "What about sex in the afterlife?" He replied, "I know your trick—you want to fantasize about the afterlife. But no—you must be prepared to forget about sex, about spouses, about love."

    No sex?

    No sexual thoughts. The idea was that we were in a war to take back Iran, so you cannot have a family until the war is won. This was the excuse the outside world would hear, but inside we were told your spouses are a barrier between you and the leadership. We were ordered to surrender our soul, heart, and mind to Rajavi and his wife.

    How did you manage to leave the organization?

    What saved me was seeing my daughter. In 1996 I came to London to arrange some meetings. I saw my daughter, after many years of not seeing her. I had totally forgotten about the guy who was the father, the old Masoud. I only knew Masoud the MEK member. The old Masoud wanted to hug her, but the group member—living under strict rules where men and women never interacted—knew he should not. I was fortunate that I had a bad back problem, so I was allowed to go and recuperate in the hospital. And in those two weeks, being around ordinary people, seeing ordinary families, I allowed feelings for my own family to come back. And so, finally, I decided to leave the group.

    Where did you go?

    I had to go on the run for a time. I learned how to hide myself around the UK until they gave up looking for me.

    What do you think it is that makes young people vulnerable to joining extremist causes?

    Well, terrorism is like a virus. It attacks us through our weaknesses. It kills our personality, our individuality, like a cult. I think there are three stages. The first stage is the injustice of the world. Young Muslims see injustice, become angry, and want to react. Then comes along a powerful ideology, and the Wahabi ideology offers a very simple, black-and-white worldview and a very narrow-minded interpretation of jihad, offered as a solution to young Muslims. But both these stages are not enough to make someone a terrorist, a human bomb, or a fighter for a caliphate. A third stage is required: the mind manipulation, which robs someone of their personality, makes them identify entirely with the group and cuts them off from their parents and society.

    So radical ideas alone aren't enough to go off and fight for, say, the Islamic State?

    If you're a young Muslim and you feel like a nobody, it's appealing to hear that we can return to the time of Prophet Mohammed—[that] we will be powerful again and feel proud of ourselves. This can make you radical—even prepared to be violent—but you will not stay a fighter or become a martyr without being entirely cut off from family and the values of the society you were brought up in. That requires the mind manipulation that goes on in a destructive cult.

    Where does the Islamic State fit in? Do you consider it a cult as well as a terrorist organization?

    The signs are there. The leader—Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi—is charismatic and has unlimited ambition. He has been introduced as the leader of all Muslims, the Caliph. Normal leaders want political power. Cult leaders want something more than governing a city or country—they want to govern history. They want to change the structure of humanity. For a while they were calling themselves ISIL—Islamic State of Iraq and Levant.

    They wanted control of Iraq, Syria, Lebanon, Jordan, Israel. Now they call themselves the Islamic State. They want whatever they think was once part of the Islamic empire, so they claim Spain, Portugal, North Africa, India, and part of China and Russia. They want the whole world, to make everyone Muslim. This is not normal leadership; this is heading toward cult. There is no limitation you can deal with, politically.

    What would you say to British parents who have children fighting in Syria or Iraq?

    It's very difficult, very delicate. If a parent says anything critical against a radical preacher, or about an organization like Islamic State, that's when a person's mind becomes defensive. It is difficult to argue rationally. So if a parent has contact [with his or her child], they should not try to talk about politics or religion. They should show only kindness and love. This is the member's weakness. Feelings do not die away, even if personality has changed. So the parent has to let them know they will be there, waiting. There has to be a pathway back to a life where family love is there, something that has nothing do with ideological thinking. Unconditional love unlocks the mind manipulation that has taken place.

  • Maryam Rajavi and the MEK
     Reply #46 - February 15, 2021, 05:16 PM

    Quote
    and your trust that guy  Sohail Jannessari??


    I’ve no opinion on him.
  • Maryam Rajavi and the MEK
     Reply #47 - February 15, 2021, 05:25 PM

    and you also know that guy  Sohail Jannessari??.. who is also a journalist...  Or it says ... he is journalist


    Apparently he’s an associate professor at UPF Ciències Polítiques i Socials in Barcelona. I don’t know any more than that.

    https://mobile.twitter.com/SoJannessari
  • Maryam Rajavi and the MEK
     Reply #48 - February 15, 2021, 05:56 PM

    Borzou Daragahi - Beyond Control:: Iran and its Opponents Locked in a Lopsided Confrontation

    https://www.jstor.org/stable/pdf/resrep20715.pdf?refreqid=excelsior%3A996173a3e63d2540dc492da78c81abb7
    Quote
    In general, much to the benefit of the leadership in Tehran, Iran’s monarchists, reformists, leftists, and ethnic nationalists despise each other—sometimes as much as they despise the regime. One group all of them despise, sometimes even more than they oppose and fear the regime, is the Mujahedin-e-Khalq Organization, sometimes known by its acronym, MEK, as well its numerous shadowy front groups. Confusing to many, this group seems to be the one that has caught the ear of the White House under Donald Trump...


    Yeez, before you ask Borzou Daragahi is a journalist opposed to the regime who I’d have some time for.

    https://mobile.twitter.com/borzou?lang=en
  • Maryam Rajavi and the MEK
     Reply #49 - February 16, 2021, 08:56 PM

    Borzou Daragahi - Beyond Control:: Iran and its Opponents Locked in a Lopsided Confrontation

    https://www.jstor.org/stable/pdf/resrep20715.pdf?refreqid=excelsior%3A996173a3e63d2540dc492da78c81abb7
    Yeez, before you ask Borzou Daragahi is a journalist opposed to the regime who I’d have some time for.

    https://mobile.twitter.com/borzou?lang=en

    I AM NOT INTERESTED IN ONE SIDE OF THE STORY dear zeca ...  neither in the music you are interested in ....  So please continue here to educate the readers about Iran.. its politics and Mullahs their kingdom .. their rules which you seem to support

    that is fine with me...

    Do not let silence become your legacy.. Question everything   
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
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