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 Topic: Jamal Khashoggi .......... and his missing story

 (Read 1275 times)
  • 1« Previous thread | Next thread »
  • Jamal Khashoggi .......... and his missing story
     OP - October 08, 2018, 06:34 PM

     Jamal Khashoggi ..........  and his  missing story heating up


    Quote
    Jamal Khashoggi - a well-known Saudi journalist - went into his country's consulate in Istanbul on 2 October to obtain a marriage document and, according to Turkish police, never came out. Authorities in Istanbul believe he was murdered within the consulate walls, but the Saudi government maintains he left.

    Once an adviser to the royal family, he had fallen sharply out of favour with the Saudi government and went into self-imposed exile last year. We take a look at Mr Khashoggi, his career and the events that led up to his disappearance.  Born in Medina in 1958, he studied business administration in the US at Indiana State University.

    He then returned to Saudi Arabia and started his career as a journalist in the 1980s as a reporter for regional newspapers covering the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan. There, he followed closely the rise of Osama Bin Laden, interviewing the late al-Qaeda leader several times during the 1980s and 1990s.

    A prominent journalist

    From there his career covered other major events in the region, including the first Gulf War in Kuwait. He returned full-time to Saudi Arabia in the 1990s and in 1999 became the deputy editor of the English-language Arab News newspaper.  In 2003 he became editor of the Al Watan newspaper but was fired just two months into his tenure for publishing stories that were critical of the Saudi clerical establishment.


    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Jamal Khashoggi .......... and his missing story
     Reply #1 - October 08, 2018, 06:44 PM

    Shake up in Riyadh: Regional and International Implication  2017

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IPn4LqEKkak

    Quote
    Saudi Arabian journalist Jamal Khashoggi and Gulf expert Kristian Coats Ulrichsen discussed the recent Saudi arrests of officials, princes, and business men and its implications on Saudi Arabia and the region.


    Turkey, Iran, and the Gulf States: The Challenges of Rebuilding Regional Stability
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dcaeslVSe6Q

    Quote
    November 13, 2015 - The second panel at MEI's 69th Annual Conference featured Abdulkhaleq Abdulla (Emirates University), Jamal Khashoggi (Al Arab News Channel), Payam Mohseni (Harvard Belfer Center), Gönül Tol (Middle East Institute), and moderator Yochi Dreazen (Foreign Policy)


    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Jamal Khashoggi .......... and his missing story
     Reply #2 - October 09, 2018, 05:29 PM

    Stunning American Government  Silence on Jamal Khashoggi

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=39sNxGbM54I

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cacMSKAv7hQ

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g7UnTuuIhWU

    Mr. Trump..  Mr. President Trump  Please say something on  Jamal Khashoggi

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Jamal Khashoggi .......... and his missing story
     Reply #3 - October 09, 2018, 05:40 PM

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yhw37reiFj0

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nh2nyi885rU

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SEyADlTbSSc

    I like that last video.. Americans are Lucky to have PLAIN SPEAKING PRESIDENT who openly threatens  and black mails every one with in his country and outside of his country 

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Jamal Khashoggi .......... and his missing story
     Reply #4 - October 09, 2018, 06:12 PM

    Was Khashoggi sent to Istanbul by Embassy in DC?



    Quote
    The Saudi journalist, missing for a week, Jamal Khashoggi was sent to the Saudi Arabian consulate in Istanbul from the Saudi Embassy in Washington DC. That’s according to NBC news who said friends of the missing journalist said it prompted concerns that he was being lured into a trap.

    NBC also reports that two other people said he was told to return another day after going to the consulate in Istanbul. President Trump has said he’ll talk to Saudi Arabian officials about the missing journalist at some point.

    Meanwhile, the United Nations human rights office urged both countries to investigate the case. It has voiced deep concern at the "apparent enforced disappearance".

    "We call for cooperation between Turkey and Saudi Arabia to conduct a prompt and impartial investigation into the circumstances of Mr Khashoggi's disappearance and to make the findings public," U.N. human rights spokeswoman Ravina Shamdasani told a Geneva news briefing.

    Saudi Arabian officials have invited Turkish experts and related officials to visit its consulate in Istanbul. That’s according to Turkey's state-owned news agency Anadolu. Turkey's Foreign Ministry said a search would be conducted there.

    Khashoggi entered the consulate last Tuesday and has not been heard of or seen since, according to his fiancée and friends.

    Turkish officials told Reuters at the weekend they believed he had been killed inside the Saudi consulate. This is a claim denied by the Gulf kingdom’s officials. Turkish Foreign Ministry spokesman Hami Aksoy said the investigation was "continuing intensively", and that the Vienna Convention allowed for consulates to be searched by the authorities of the host country with the consent of the mission chief.

    "The consulate building will be searched in the framework of the investigation," Aksoy said in a written statement. There was no immediate comment on the report from the Saudi authorities.

    Khashoggi was previously a prominent newspaper editor in Saudi Arabia and an adviser to a former head of intelligence. His disappearance has sparked global concerns, particularly after Turkish sources said over the weekend that authorities believed he had been killed inside the consulate.

    Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan on Monday asked Riyadh to prove its claim that Khashoggi had left the Saudi consulate in Istanbul, while Washington urged Saudi Arabia to support an investigation into his disappearance.

    well that is the Euro News...

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Jamal Khashoggi .......... and his missing story
     Reply #5 - October 10, 2018, 05:59 PM

    Jamal Khashoggi: Saudi ‘death’ squad identified from leaked airport footage   _thetimes.co.uk



    Quote
    The 15 members of the squad the Turkish authorities believe to be implicated in the disappearance and possible killing of the Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi have been identified from immigration surveillance footage.

    Video stills showing the 15 men as they entered the country and went through passport control on Tuesday October 2, the day Mr Khashoggi went missing, were leaked to Turkish newspapers overnight.

    Some of the names and photographs have been matched to known members of the Saudi army and other security forces. One is said to be a senior government forensic scientist...

    News organizations around the globe MUST come together  and protest  to solve the disappearance of Mr. Jamal Khashogg.  I hope American president stands for rule of international law on the murders inside embassy,,,,

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Jamal Khashoggi .......... and his missing story
     Reply #6 - October 11, 2018, 01:17 AM

    Where is Jamal Khashoggi?  News from different countries

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_jLEx1VZn-0

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qq0aEZI6p0s

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lEEfuAYnl7U

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Jamal Khashoggi .......... and his missing story
     Reply #7 - October 11, 2018, 01:23 AM

    Where is Jamal Khashoggi?  News from different countries

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V5ZkTYjyLTk

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e9n2k_Y9JTE

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aX1OAnAqyOo

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Jamal Khashoggi .......... and his missing story
     Reply #8 - October 11, 2018, 01:32 AM

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cacMSKAv7hQ

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3CFzLrpC1AY

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G3qUFTO5104

    INSANE BUTCHERS OF ARABIA doing such murders for the sake of their snake land rulers .. we are NOT living in barbaric times ..  there must be accountability for such brutal crimes

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Jamal Khashoggi .......... and his missing story
     Reply #9 - October 11, 2018, 01:08 PM

    Khashoggi: Ex-US diplomat and a Saudi activist on case  ,,BBC NEWS.. Todays BBC news



    Quote
    Former diplomat and US Under-Secretary of State for Political Affairs, Nicholas Burns, told BBC Hardtalk's Stephen Sackur that because Mr Khashoggi was a permanent resident of the United States there was a direct interest of the US government to pressure the Saudi government to “tell the truth of what happened.”

    London based Saudi activist Prof Madawi Al-Rasheed said she was surprised that Mr Khashoggi entered the consulate, explaining: "I would never set foot in the Saudi embassy even when I wanted my passport to be renewed."

    She was stripped of her Saudi citizenship in 2005 after publishing criticism of the Saudi authorities.

    worth watching the video...


    Senator Graham of USA   about Missing Journalist Jamal Khashoggi 

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fOvrukI5LhE

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Jamal Khashoggi .......... and his missing story
     Reply #10 - October 11, 2018, 04:20 PM

    Saudi official condemns 'malicious' accusations  Says News

    Quote
    The Saudi ambassador to Washington, Prince Khalid bin Salman bin Abdulaziz, has described the allegations as "malicious leaks and grim rumours" and said the kingdom is "gravely concerned" about Khashoggi.

    Saudi officials maintain he left the consulate shortly after entering, though it has failed to provide evidence to back that up, such as video footage.

    Senior US officials call Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman

    The White House said National Security Advisor John Bolton and Senior Advisor Jared Kushner - Donald Trump's son-in-law - spoke to Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman about Khashoggi's disappearance over the past two days.

    US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo followed up with his own call to the crown prince, who has forged close ties to the Trump administration, especially Kushner.

    In both calls, they asked for more details and for the Saudi government to be transparent in the investigation process," White House spokeswoman Sarah Sanders said in a statement.

    White House officials said the Saudis provided little information

    Quote
    Khashoggi's Apple watch

    A Turkish security official told Reuters news agency the Apple smartwatch Khashoggi was wearing at the time of his disappearance was being looked into by Turkish investigators.

    They said the watch was connected to a mobile phone Khashoggi left outside and security and intelligence agents in Turkey believe it may provide important clues as to Khashoggi’s whereabouts or what happened to him.

    Quote
    If the watch and phone were connected to the internet and the devices were close enough to synchronise, data from the watch - saved to the cloud - could potentially provide investigators with information such as the journalist's heart rate and location.


    "We have determined that it was on him when he walked into the consulate," a security official said. "Intelligence services, the prosecutor’s office, and a technology team are working on this."


    I hope Apple folks and I Hope American President Son in-law  gathers true information Mr. Prince of sand land ... and reveals to public the truth ..

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Jamal Khashoggi .......... and his missing story
     Reply #11 - October 15, 2018, 04:55 PM

    Interesting how this story makes the headlines and front pages of the West's media as well as our politicians issuing 'strong' statements whereas the continued bombardment of Yemen and this https://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2018/oct/15/yemen-on-brink-worst-famine-100-years-un is an afterthought.
  • Jamal Khashoggi .......... and his missing story
     Reply #12 - October 20, 2018, 11:26 AM

    Interesting how this story makes the headlines and front pages of the West's media as well as our politicians issuing 'strong' statements whereas the continued bombardment of Yemen and this https://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2018/oct/15/yemen-on-brink-worst-famine-100-years-un is an afterthought.

    Two are entirely different issues dear  one is civil war with in country and supported by countries with different types of Islam ..

    the other one is A reporter who criticizes  sand land snakes  getting killed by the THE RULING SNAKES OF SAND LAND ..

    Today's news on that says
    Quote
    Two weeks after his disappearance, Saudi Arabia admits Khashoggi was killed inside Istanbul consulate

    Saudi Arabia on Saturday admitted that dissident journalist Jamal Khashoggi was killed inside its consulate in Istanbul in a "fist fight", state media said, two weeks after his disappearance sparked a global furore.

    "The discussions between Jamal Khashoggi and those he met at the kingdom's consulate in Istanbul... devolved into a fistfight, leading to his death," the Saudi Press Agency said, citing the public prosecutor.

    The kingdom also announced the sacking of a top intelligence official Ahmad al-Assiri and royal court media adviser Saud al-Qahtani, both top aides to Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman who has faced mounting pressure over the Khashoggi affair.


    Oh ROGUES OF ISLAM..
    where is his dead body?
    he deserves decent burial

    The lesson here is NEVER GO IN TO THE SNAKES DEN UNLESS IT IS ELIMINATED ... He could have got those damn papers signed in  any Saud snake land embassy in west or by mail.. There was no reason for him to go to Turkey..  He was very naive and nice guy .  International News Paper community  and reporters  must protest on this

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Jamal Khashoggi .......... and his missing story
     Reply #13 - October 20, 2018, 11:35 AM

    Jamal Khashoggi  words

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qxJE-OC85-E


    Jamal Khashoggi  News

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iAeUgKbykSM

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mwzull0Ilu4

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=unLSprkJsgs

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Jamal Khashoggi .......... and his missing story
     Reply #14 - October 20, 2018, 11:36 AM

    Saudi Arabia's missing princes

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r2KYQWPUbG4

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Jamal Khashoggi .......... and his missing story
     Reply #15 - October 20, 2018, 12:08 PM

    Washington Post Publishes Last Jamal Khashoggi Column And Horrific Details Of His Death Leaked

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JfjM_-3Chm8



    Jamal Khashoggi: What the Arab world needs most is free expression

     
    Quote
    I was recently online looking at the 2018 “Freedom in the World” report published by Freedom House and came to a grave realization. There is only one country in the Arab world that has been classified as “free.” That nation is Tunisia. Jordan, Morocco and Kuwait come second, with a classification of “partly free.” The rest of the countries in the Arab world are classified as “not free.”

    As a result, Arabs living in these countries are either uninformed or misinformed. They are unable to adequately address, much less publicly discuss, matters that affect the region and their day-to-day lives. A state-run narrative dominates the public psyche, and while many do not believe it, a large majority of the population falls victim to this false narrative. Sadly, this situation is unlikely to change.

    The Arab world was ripe with hope during the spring of 2011. Journalists, academics and the general population were brimming with expectations of a bright and free Arab society within their respective countries. They expected to be emancipated from the hegemony of their governments and the consistent interventions and censorship of information. These expectations were quickly shattered; these societies either fell back to the old status quo or faced even harsher conditions than before.

    My dear friend, the prominent Saudi writer Saleh al-Shehi, wrote one of the most famous columns ever published in the Saudi press. He unfortunately is now serving an unwarranted five-year prison sentence for supposed comments contrary to the Saudi establishment. The Egyptian government’s seizure of the entire print run of a newspaper, al-Masry al Youm, did not enrage or provoke a reaction from colleagues. These actions no longer carry the consequence of a backlash from the international community. Instead, these actions may trigger condemnation quickly followed by silence.

    As a result, Arab governments have been given free rein to continue silencing the media at an increasing rate. There was a time when journalists believed the Internet would liberate information from the censorship and control associated with print media. But these governments, whose very existence relies on the control of information, have aggressively blocked the Internet. They have also arrested local reporters and pressured advertisers to harm the revenue of specific publications.

    [Read Khashoggi’s last column for The Post before his disappearance in Arabic]

    There are a few oases that continue to embody the spirit of the Arab Spring. Qatar’s government continues to support international news coverage, in contrast to its neighbors’ efforts to uphold the control of information to support the “old Arab order.” Even in Tunisia and Kuwait, where the press is considered at least “partly free,” the media focuses on domestic issues but not issues faced by the greater Arab world. They are hesitant to provide a platform for journalists from Saudi Arabia, Egypt and Yemen. Even Lebanon, the Arab world’s crown jewel when it comes to press freedom, has fallen victim to the polarization and influence of pro-Iran Hezbollah.

    The Arab world is facing its own version of an Iron Curtain, imposed not by external actors but through domestic forces vying for power. During the Cold War, Radio Free Europe, which grew over the years into a critical institution, played an important role in fostering and sustaining the hope of freedom. Arabs need something similar. In 1967, the New York Times and The Post took joint ownership of the International Herald Tribune newspaper, which went on to become a platform for voices from around the world.

    My publication, The Post, has taken the initiative to translate many of my pieces and publish them in Arabic. For that, I am grateful. Arabs need to read in their own language so they can understand and discuss the various aspects and complications of democracy in the United States and the West. If an Egyptian reads an article exposing the actual cost of a construction project in Washington, then he or she would be able to better understand the implications of similar projects in his or her community.

    The Arab world needs a modern version of the old transnational media so citizens can be informed about global events. More important, we need to provide a platform for Arab voices. We suffer from poverty, mismanagement and poor education. Through the creation of an independent international forum, isolated from the influence of nationalist governments spreading hate through propaganda, ordinary people in the Arab world would be able to address the structural problems their societies face.

     

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Jamal Khashoggi .......... and his missing story
     Reply #16 - October 22, 2018, 02:42 PM

    The Ugly Terror Truth About Jamal Khashoggi  from     juicepress.com  by  By Daniel Greenfield -

    Quote
    In high school, Jamal Khashoggi had a good friend. His name was Osama bin Laden.
    Quote
    “We were hoping to establish an Islamic state anywhere,” Khashoggi reminisced about their time together in the Muslim Brotherhood. “We believed that the first one would lead to another, and that would have a domino effect which could reverse the history of mankind.”

    The friendship endured with Jamal Khashoggi following Osama bin Laden to Afghanistan. Khashoggi credited Adel Batterjee, listed at one time as one of “the world’s foremost terrorist financiers” by the Treasury Department, with bringing him to Afghanistan to report on the fighting.

    The media calls Khashoggi a journalist, but his writings from 80s Afghanistan read as Jihadist propaganda with titles like, “Arab Mujahadeen in Afghanistan II: Exemplifies the Unity of Islamic Ummah”.

    And when Osama bin Laden set up Al Qaeda, he called Khashoggi with the details.

    After Afghanistan, Jamal Khashoggi went to work as a media adviser for former Saudi intel boss, Prince Turki bin Faisal, alleged to have links to Al Qaeda. Those allegations came from, among others, Zacarias Moussaoui, the alleged twentieth hijacker.

    When the other 19 hijackers perpetrated the attacks of September 11, Khashoggi wrote that the Saudis would not “give in” to American “demands” for “unconditional condemnation” and “total cooperation”.

    “Saudis tend to link the ugliness of what happened in New York and Washington with what has happened and continues to happen in Palestine. It is time that the United States comes to understand the effect of its foreign policy and the consequences of that policy,” he declared.

    “A Muslim cannot be happy with the suffering of others. Even if this suffering is that of Americans who neglected the suffering of Palestinians for half a century.”

    That’s the real Khashoggi, a cynical and manipulative apologist for Islamic terrorism, not the mythical martyred dissident whose disappearance the media has spent the worst part of a week raving about.

    Jamal Khashoggi was not a moderate. Some describe him as the leader of the Saudi Muslim Brotherhood. The Islamist network admires Hitler and seeks to impose Islamic law around the world. Nor was he a supporter of freedom of the press. In one of his Al Jazeera appearances, he complained that the Saudi government was allowing some journalists to report positively on Israel.

    His final project, DAWN or Democracy for the Arab World Now was meant to aid Islamists. According to Azzam Al-Tamimi, an old Muslim Brotherhood ally aiding Jamal, “The Muslim Brothers and Islamists were the biggest victims of the foiled Arab spring.” Al-Tamimi has endorsed suicide bombings.

    But unlike Osama bin Laden, Khashoggi did not use the Muslim Brotherhood as a gateway drug to the pure and uncut violence of Al Qaeda or ISIS. He was still betting on a political takeover.

    As he recently put it, “Democracy and political Islam go together.”

    Khashoggi went on making the case for the Islamic state of the Muslim Brotherhood. He went on making that case even as the Saudis decided that the Brotherhood had become too dangerous.

    Like his old friend, Jamal Khashoggi went into exile in a friendly Islamist country. Osama bin Laden found refuge in Pakistan and Khashoggi ended up in Turkey. The Khashoggi family had originated from Turkey. And Turkey was swiftly becoming the leading Sunni Islamist power in the region. Living in Turkey put Khashoggi at the intersection of the Turkish-Qatari backers of the Brotherhood and the Western media.

    His disappearance has touched off fury and anger from the Islamist regime that harbored him. And it has also set off an unprecedented firestorm of rage and grief by the American media which adored him.

    Media spin describes Khashoggi as a dissident. And he certainly was that. But so was Osama bin Laden. What Khashoggi wasn’t, was a moderate. No more so than the Muslim Brotherhood. He wasn’t a proponent of human rights, but of Islamic rule. He could be found on Al Jazeera, Qatar’s Jihadist propaganda network, bemoaning Saudi opposition to the Brotherhood and its friendliness to Israel.

    “Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman should get rid of his complex against the Muslim Brotherhood and stop treating them as the enemy or a threat to Saudi Arabia,” he complained, and urged the Saudis to fight Israel instead.

    Jamal Khashoggi’s career of spouting Muslim Brotherhood propaganda for his new Turkish and Qatari masters came to an end in a curious way. Before Khashoggi allegedly entered the Saudi embassy, from which Turkey claims that he disappeared, he told his Turkish fiancé to call Yasin Aktay if he didn’t return.

    Before the summer coup of 2016, Turkey was said to have 50,000 political prisoners. Many of them were members of the country’s oppressed Kurdish minority which is deprived of its most basic civil rights. These include even the use of their own language. Doing so can carry a prison sentence.

    In that terrible summer, Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, Turkey’s Islamic tyrant, finished securing his absolute hold on power with the coup as his Reichstag fire. The alleged coup became a blank check for the mass arrest and torture of countless thousands of political prisoners. Amnesty International estimated that 50,000 had been detained. The UN listed a figure as high as 180,000. They included 300 journalists.

    Lawyers described clients being brought to them covered in blood. Erdogan went after professors, judges, law enforcement, the military and the last remnants of a free press. A Human Rights Watch report documented electric shocks, beatings with truncheons and rubber hoses, and rape by Erdogan’s Islamic thugs. Heads were banged against walls. Men were forced to kneel on burning hot asphalt. Medical reports showed skull fractures, damage to testicles and dehydration.

    The media didn’t show any of the hysterical outrage at these crimes that it has over the disappearance of Jamal Khashoggi. The media cares more about Khashoggi, a former media mouthpiece of the Saudi regime before it turned on his Muslim Brotherhood brothers, than about 300 Turkish reporters.

    It’s not hypocrisy, it’s consistency.

    Erdogan and Khashoggi are both militant Islamic activists. And their opponents, the victims of Erdogan’s Reichstag fire and the new Saudi king, had fallen afoul of them for being insufficiently militantly Islamist.

    The media will always take the side of Islamists over non-Islamists. That’s why it bleeds for Khashoggi.

    There was a reason why Jamal Khashoggi felt so comfortable in Turkey, while actual journalists in the country were terrified of being locked up, tortured and disappeared. If that was the fate that befell Khashoggi, it was a commonplace one in Turkey. And it may have been carried out by his own Turkish allies who decided that their Saudi subversive had more value as a false flag martyr than a house guest.

    The media’s disproportionate outrage over Khashoggi has nothing to do with human rights. If it did, the media would have been just as outraged at the arrests and torture of tens of thousands in Turkey.

    It’s not. And it won’t be.

    And the politicians shrilly urging that we punish the Saudis never thought about curtailing arms sales to Turkey. Many of the same politicians were unhappy when President Trump used economic pressure on Erdogan in an effort to free American hostages, like Pastor Andrew Brunson, being held by Turkey.

    This is about Islam.

    The struggle between Saudi Arabia and the UAE on the one hand, and Turkey, Qatar and Iran on the other, is the next stage of the Arab Spring. And, from Yemen to Turkey, the media has made no secret of being on the Islamist side. Its outrage over Khashoggi, like its claims of a human rights crisis over the Saudi bombings in Yemen, are not journalism, they’re the political spin of the Islamist axis.

    The media has reported every claim of victimhood by the Muslim Brotherhood and Qatar’s Al Jazeera propaganda arm, while giving as little attention as possible to the victims of Muslim Brotherhood church bombings. Its coverage of Israel has been little more than terrorist propaganda since Osama was in diapers. Its coverage of the Khashoggi case is every bit as dishonest as its slanted attacks on the Saudi embargo of Qatar, as its propaganda about the wars in Yemen and Libya, and just as devoid of context.

    The Khashoggi case demands context.

    Before the media and the politicians who listen to it drag the United States into a conflict with Saudi Arabia over a Muslim Brotherhood activist based on the word of an enemy country still holding Americans hostage, we deserve the context.

    And we deserve the truth.

    The media wants the Saudis to answer questions about Jamal Khashoggi. But maybe the media should be forced to answer why the Washington Post was working with a Muslim Brotherhood propagandist?

    The real mystery isn’t Khashoggi’s disappearance. It’s why Republicans aren’t asking those questions.

    The media’s relationship with Khashoggi is far more damning than anything the Saudis might have done to him. And the media should be held accountable for its relationship with Osama bin Laden’s old friend.

    and that is what they write....apparently it was first published in  sultanknish.blogspot.com  by mr. juicy   Daniel Greenfield.....

    well  more to come

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
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