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 Topic: Iran uprising - is the end in sight for the Islamic regime?

 (Read 15872 times)
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  • Iran uprising - is the end in sight for the Islamic regime?
     Reply #180 - June 25, 2018, 06:06 PM

    Footage from Shiraz today:

    https://mobile.twitter.com/Raman_Ghavami/status/1011263463744851968
  • Iran uprising - is the end in sight for the Islamic regime?
     Reply #181 - June 25, 2018, 06:09 PM

    Footage from Tehran:

    https://mobile.twitter.com/Raman_Ghavami/status/1011170570526916608

    https://mobile.twitter.com/Raman_Ghavami/status/1011266755455602689

    https://mobile.twitter.com/Raman_Ghavami/status/1011275308543115265

    https://mobile.twitter.com/Raman_Ghavami/status/1011259490359042049
  • Iran uprising - is the end in sight for the Islamic regime?
     Reply #182 - June 25, 2018, 06:42 PM

    Thread on yesterday’s protests: https://mobile.twitter.com/HeshmatAlavi/status/1010791271869403136

    Thread on today’s protests: https://mobile.twitter.com/HeshmatAlavi/status/1011154007363084288
  • Iran uprising - is the end in sight for the Islamic regime?
     Reply #183 - June 25, 2018, 07:09 PM

    Another thread: https://mobile.twitter.com/ICHRI/status/1011251814522589185

    Thread from a source that’s hostile to protests: https://mobile.twitter.com/SayedMousavi7/status/1011247556175659008

    EA Worldview report: http://eaworldview.com/2018/06/iran-daily-protests-in-tehran-amid-currency-collapse/
  • Iran uprising - is the end in sight for the Islamic regime?
     Reply #184 - June 26, 2018, 02:23 PM

    https://mobile.twitter.com/Raman_Ghavami/status/1011579853362028545
    Quote
    More protesters are joining. In some art of the city clashes between protesters&security forces’ve started. Two arrested by the SF&in response Iranians burnt SF motorbikes and injured a member of IRGC. According to forces more than a million of Tehranis are on the streets.


    I’m not sure if the number quoted is realistic or wishful thinking.
  • Iran uprising - is the end in sight for the Islamic regime?
     Reply #185 - June 26, 2018, 06:21 PM

    Iranian protesters chanting "Death to Palestine" in Tehran

    "Life is not a matter of holding good cards, but of playing a poor hand well."
    - Robert Louis Stevenson
  • Iran uprising - is the end in sight for the Islamic regime?
     Reply #186 - June 26, 2018, 06:34 PM

    Iran’s judiciary chief threatens protesting merchants with execution as protests continue
  • Iran uprising - is the end in sight for the Islamic regime?
     Reply #187 - June 28, 2018, 12:35 AM

    Khamenei urges judiciary to confront those who harm economy

    "Life is not a matter of holding good cards, but of playing a poor hand well."
    - Robert Louis Stevenson
  • Iran uprising - is the end in sight for the Islamic regime?
     Reply #188 - June 29, 2018, 08:07 AM



    i don;t care about  THAT FUCKING MULLAH or any other Iranian mullah baboons   that bent on ruining the country and its economy but this  is very sad that striker Sardar Azmoun retires from international football  and he is just 23 year old...

    Common Azmoun ...  let us not be emotional

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Iran uprising - is the end in sight for the Islamic regime?
     Reply #189 - August 10, 2018, 08:28 PM

    Azadi stadium in Tehran today - “death to the dictator”
    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=b9GrxL1X88E https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=o2IB9HVZ10g
    Thread: https://mobile.twitter.com/HeshmatAlavi/status/1027934753096454144
  • Iran uprising - is the end in sight for the Islamic regime?
     Reply #190 - August 10, 2018, 08:41 PM

    Thread on the latest round of protests: https://mobile.twitter.com/Raman_Ghavami/status/1025443954605662209
  • Iran uprising - is the end in sight for the Islamic regime?
     Reply #191 - August 11, 2018, 06:32 AM


    Is he Twittering from Iran???

    Quote
    Raman Ghavami @Raman_Ghavami   Aug 3

    I tweeted this thread last night but I had to delete it for some reasons.
    Tomorrow is an important day for current anti establishment protests. 16/16


    interesting guy ... By any chance do you know him dear Zeca  

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Iran uprising - is the end in sight for the Islamic regime?
     Reply #192 - August 11, 2018, 07:59 AM

    Is he Twittering from Iran???

    I’m pretty sure he’s outside Iran.
    Quote
    interesting guy ... By any chance do you know him dear Zeca  

    I don’t really know anything about him, other than what I can gather from his twitter feed.

    Generally I wouldn’t assume that the opinions and interpretations of Iranian exiles are representative of people within the country. In particular there’s a lot being tweeted from Iranian Americans that’s variously pro-Shah, pro-MEK or pro-Trump, all of which there’s reason to be uneasy about. I’m not sure how much bearing that has on what’s happening inside Iran though.
  • Iran uprising - is the end in sight for the Islamic regime?
     Reply #193 - August 11, 2018, 09:34 AM

    I’m pretty sure he’s outside Iran.I don’t really know anything about him, other than what I can gather from his twitter feed. 

    oh I see  let us get  tits  from Iran even  if they come from Russia in the names of Iranian public.........

    Sadr deputy: Defending Iran is a ‘religious and ethical duty

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ySbMdObV90E

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wyHpVZoMIbc

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Iran uprising - is the end in sight for the Islamic regime?
     Reply #194 - August 11, 2018, 10:17 AM

    According to Raman Ghavami’s academia account he’s in the UK:: https://independent.academia.edu/RamanGhavami
    Quote
    A Middle East analyst, worked for various social and political organisations across the Middle East and Europe such as EU, MDM and KKC ... currently working for a consultancy firm based in the United Kingdom...


    An article by him: https://www.academia.edu/36392279/John_Bolton_s_relations_with_the_MEK_is_backfiring_edited.pdf
    Quote
    John Bolton’s relations with the MEK are backfiring

    President Trump recently appointed John Bolton, previous US ambassador to the UN, as his new National Security Advisor to the confusion of many, especially Iranians. Within the Iranian community, Mr Bolton has been introduced as a supporter of the Mujahideen-e Khalq, a group which for the past four decades, in both its theories and practice, has damaged its credibility among the Iranians. The Kurds in particular, for example, have not forgotten how the MEK participated in the Anfal genocide, where alongside Saddam Hussein, they killed thousands of Kurds after a pro- democracy uprising in 1991. In the following year a US congressional research service report detailed the evidence if their complicity, on the basis of U.S government sources. The Kurdish people of Kermanshah and Ilam also have a negative view on the MEK, considering that in its failed armed force operations in Kurdish inhabited regions, Kurdish lives were lost, and more importantly, seen as unimportant to both Iran and the MEK.

    But John Bolton’s relations with the Muhahideen-e Khalq, whether out of ignorance or denial, continue to persist to this very day, leaving many Iranians confused. The MEK was a spearhead of Iran’s so- called Islamic revolution, and it helped Ayatollah Khomeini to weaken non-Islamist groups after the 1979 revolution. In fact, the leaders of the MEK only started to oppose the Islamic Republic of Iran after Ayatollah Khomeini announced himself as the supreme leader. It was a power struggle, and not a genuine desire to establish a democratic system in Iran, which pushed the MEK to oppose Ayatollah Khomeini.

    And there are many other reasons for people to dislike the MEK. The MEK joined Iraq in the Iran- Iraq war. With Bolton’s expressed support of the MEK, those who oppose both the Iranian government, and also the organisation, find themselves in a bind – having to prove themselves to those who oppose the government in Iran and abroad. Iranian state media as well as pro-Iranian government journalists and organisations in the US and Europe have been using John Bolton’s relations with Mujahideen-e Khalq (MEK) in order to push back against Iranians who oppose the government, knowing very well that the MEK does not have much support amongst Iranians at home.

    Support for the MEK also leaves Iran’s minority communities feeling insecure. The MEK represent a Shia ideology which is seen as a dangerous sign for minority religious groups in Iran who do not see any difference between the current government in Tehran and the MEK. During the Iraq-Iran war the MEK was eager to take power and the group cooperated with Saddam Hussein to attack Iran, a fact which Iranians, including the majority who oppose the regime, have not forgotten about and the MEK has not apologised for its cynical mistakes when they sided with Khomeini and then Saddam Hussein. Furthermore, for ethnic minority groups, such as Kurds, Balouchis, Azaris or Arabs who form more than half of the population on Iran, the MEK does not represent a progressive movement, but a different face of the same despotic Islamist system in place.

    The MEK is also, simply put, seen as an archaic organisation with no legitimacy in the eyes of many Iranians. The youth represents the majority of Iran’s population and the MEK who represent a Shia based Islamic ideology consequently cannot be attractive to the new generation in Iran. The group does not have wide support amongst Iranian people including the young generation, neither does it have a wide network of organised members inside the country. The MEK’s major activities are on social media rather than being able to organise mass demonstrations in Iran. Nevertheless, the MEK has some elements placed inside the government who pass information to the group. As such, replacing the current autocratic government with another government or group represented by a religious group cannot be an option for young Iranians who want democracy, prosperity and a secular state. Iranians have been living under autocratic Islamic rule for the past four decades and the idea of being ruled by another Islamist group is not an appealing choice for the majority of the population.

    The reason the Iranian regime and its affiliated organisations and journalists in the West have been pumping news about John Bolton’s relations with the MEK must be seen as a counterattack by Tehran. Indeed, the regime knows that using this relation will only work in its favour. The Iranian government’s affiliates have therefore been spreading the idea that ‘US supports the MEK to overthrow the government in Iran’, and it’s not surprising that for even those who oppose the Iranian government, many can conclude that the US establishment implies that it would like to replace Ayatollah Khamenei’s cult with another cult.

    In light of all this, investing heavily on the MEK could only backfire as it has not clarified its position on its actions in the past which the majority of Iranians despise this group for.

    John Bolton’s views have been clear to everyone when it comes to the Iran Deal and the future of the government in Tehran. He wants regime change in Iran and he is against the JCPOA but this is not the reason for confusion amongst Iranians, instead it is his pervious and current relations with the MEK that should be clarified. Have there been any changes in his relations with the MEK since he took his new position? This should be publicly announced in order to clear any confusions amongst Iranians who want change, democracy and a better future. Furthermore, the MEK can attract Iranians after clarifying its position on the allegations mentioned above. Has the MEK changed since 1990s? This has to be announced only by the MEK leaderships and members and it must be visible for Iranians in practice. If not, then this could weaken Iranians’ efforts for change in the country.

  • Iran uprising - is the end in sight for the Islamic regime?
     Reply #195 - September 08, 2018, 11:28 AM

    Meanwhile in Iraq…

    Chanting ‘Iran, out!’ Iraqi protesters torch Iranian Consulate in Basra
    Quote
    People in Basra have accused Iraq’s political class of abandoning them, ignoring the people’s pleas for relief as the politicians jockey for control of a new government. They have expressed their displeasure by burning down the headquarters of nearly every political party in the city, along with offices belonging to Shiite militias that won parliamentary seats in the May elections.

    Fresh graffiti outside the destroyed offices of the powerful Badr Organization, an Iran-aligned party that counts Iraq’s interior minister among its senior leaders, announced: “We demand blood.”

    Packs of young men surrounded the gated complex of the Iranian Consulate as the sun set on Friday, breaking past police checkpoints as they smashed their way into the empty building and set it on fire.

    Dozens lingered afterward, taking photos and videos of the burning consulate as police stood by — sometimes chatting or joking with the young demonstrators.

    Police had repelled an attack on the consulate Thursday night but were overwhelmed by the growing number of young men Friday, one officer said. He said he was hesitant to draw his weapon on the protesters after at least eight were shot during other demonstrations this week, drawing widespread condemnation from the government and from the United Nations and human rights groups.

    “Visa services are officially suspended,” cracked one of the demonstrators as he filmed the flames and dark plumes of smoke with his cellphone.

    “Shall we go for the Turkish Consulate next?” a friend responded.


    Thread:

    https://mobile.twitter.com/TamerELG/status/1037992896203567106

    https://mobile.twitter.com/KarlreMarks/status/1038150882762928129

  • Iran uprising - is the end in sight for the Islamic regime?
     Reply #196 - September 08, 2018, 12:14 PM

    Channel 4 report on the MEK presence in Albania:

    The shadowy cult Trump advisors tout as an alternative to the Iranian government
  • Iran uprising - is the end in sight for the Islamic regime?
     Reply #197 - November 16, 2019, 02:18 PM

    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/11/15/world/middleeast/iran-gasoline-prices-rations.html
    Quote
    Iran abruptly raised gasoline prices as much as 300 percent early Friday and imposed a strict rationing system, and within hours protests erupted across the country with angry crowds calling for the ouster of President Hassan Rouhani.

    The new energy policy appeared to be the latest attempt by the Islamic Republic to manage an economic crisis worsened by American sanctions that have sharply reduced oil exports. Mr. Rouhani said at a speech a day earlier that Iran faced a deficit amounting to nearly two-thirds of its annual $45 billion budget.

    By Friday night, large crowds had gathered in major cities including Shiraz, Mashhad, Ahwaz and Bandar Abbas, as well as in a range of smaller working class towns. In some places the protests turned violent, according to videos posted on social media showing riot police officers spraying tear gas in one confrontation and smashing vehicle windshields in another.

    Like their counterparts in Lebanon and Iraq, the protests in Iran on Friday were set off by economic anxiety, but some quickly assumed an antigovernment tone.

    Iranians across political factions — both hard-liners and reformists — expressed fury on social media, saying the price increases would only hurt the people and create more loopholes for financial corruption.

    Some said the timing of the policy change was especially ill advised, given the popular unrest that has convulsed Lebanon and Iraq.
    ...

  • Iran uprising - is the end in sight for the Islamic regime?
     Reply #198 - November 16, 2019, 02:24 PM

    Thread: https://mobile.twitter.com/HadiNili/status/1195627827623813121
    Quote
    verified video by BBC:
    #IranProtests gets violent in NW city of #Tabriz.
    On the first day of working week in Iran, people are blocking streets and highways in protest to gas price hike.
    Happening in many cities and towns - not limited to big ones.

  • Iran uprising - is the end in sight for the Islamic regime?
     Reply #199 - November 16, 2019, 05:36 PM

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=P0VKo7HeYKE
    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=sMcQ0sfEjqs
  • Iran uprising - is the end in sight for the Islamic regime?
     Reply #200 - November 16, 2019, 08:03 PM

    Updates from Hadi Nili: https://mobile.twitter.com/i/moments/1195675835493171200
  • Iran uprising - is the end in sight for the Islamic regime?
     Reply #201 - November 16, 2019, 08:15 PM

    https://www.jpost.com/Middle-East/Iran-cuts-off-internet-in-wake-of-gas-price-protests-5-killed-608032
    Quote
    Iranian mobile networks appeared to go offline on Saturday night amid rising protests in Iran. Videos from across the country showed security forces firing tear gas, clashing protesters and also showed images of Iranian regime figures being burned and people angry that price hikes were allegedly being used to fund foreign wars.

    Iran’s protests come after massive protests across the border in Iraq where more than 300 have been killed by security forces. They also come amid protests in Lebanon. Iran has major allies in southern Iraq and Lebanon and Iranians have learned about the protests abroad through their own media, potentially fueling local decisions to rise up.

    Protests appeared to begin in Iran’s southwest province of Ahwaz that borders Iraq. Six protesters were reported killed by locals and social media that support them. Because Ahwaz borders Iraq, where there are ongoing protests and because some locals speak Arabic, it is likely the protests were partly spillover. However they targeted slightly different issues, including anger at the Iranian regime and fuel prices.  Video showed some important parts of the city engulfed in smoke and fire from various street protests. Gas stations were one target. Locals say fuel prices have risen fifty percent across the country. On November 11 protesters had torn down the Iranian flag in Ahwaz representing larger anti-regime sentiment.

    On Saturday protests spread to Tabriz in the north as snow blanketed Tehran. They had also spread to Mashhad, Bandar Abbas on the coast, Khorramshahr, Abadan, Shiraz and Sirjan. Some protesters have targeted President Hassan Rouhani, who has been in power since 2013. Both Rouhani and the Supreme Leader Ayatollah Khamenei have slammed Israel over the weekend, seeking to distract from the chaos at home. Rouhani has said that the original plan was to increase fuel costs five-fold due to austerity measures at home. Rouhani has also called out corruption recently. He appears to be faltering and unable to control events, fighting off challenges by various rivals.

    Videos, which are difficult to confirm, showed protesters burning banks across the country. In Tehran a Maskan bank branch was allegedly burned. Behbahan in Khuzestan province in the south. A video from Shiraz, 320 km to the east of the burning bank, showed hundreds of men rioting. Protesters have shouted against Iranian involvement abroad, even condemning the regime for involvement in supporting Islamic Jihad in Gaza over the recent flare-up with Israel. Some protesters argue that the regime has increased prices to fund Hezbollah in Lebanon and other foreign adventures. They also shout “down with the dictator,” in Tehran. They also chant against paying 3,000 toman a liter, around one dollar, for gas. In Andishe, south of the Caspian sea, people took over a Basij militia headquarters. In Eslamshahr, a twenty minute drive south, people protested against wasting money on “Palestine.” In Chahardangeh, across the city of Tehran to the east of Eslamshahr, people came out in the rain. They did the same in Shahriar, also near Tehran. In the past the Basij has been responsible for suppressing protests. In some areas security forces retreated in the face of protests. In Urmia  the Kurdish region people chanted “the enemy is here,” a reference to the regime. Posters of the supreme leader were torn down in other cities. In Isfahan a protester was reported killed.

  • Iran uprising - is the end in sight for the Islamic regime?
     Reply #202 - November 16, 2019, 08:17 PM

    People's Mojahedin Organization of Iran - PMOI/MEK


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BHxKVwBX63c

    that is Maryam Rajavi.........

    Protests in Iran Over Fuel Price Hike
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IQSx2HxsPrI

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P0VKo7HeYKE

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Iran uprising - is the end in sight for the Islamic regime?
     Reply #203 - November 16, 2019, 10:20 PM

    Thread: https://mobile.twitter.com/GissouNia/status/1195775170180349952
    Quote
    My Iraqi pal just sent me a solidarity letter from the Iraqi protesters in Tahrir Sq being shared on Iraqi social media ...

  • Iran uprising - is the end in sight for the Islamic regime?
     Reply #204 - November 17, 2019, 11:57 AM

    Thread: https://mobile.twitter.com/libcomorg/status/1195992294551363584
    Quote
    And as I posted that, this via anon:
    "Just wanted to say that this time protests are more complicated and radicalized than 2018. There is no accurate analysis but the protests are very very widespread.  Many banks and police stations have been destroyed countrywide."

    "It was exploded just yesterday. Friday the government declared the petrol price hike and yesterday protesters came to streets. but today the internet connections are blocked countrywide. We use vpns and info transfer is really hard"

  • Iran uprising - is the end in sight for the Islamic regime?
     Reply #205 - November 17, 2019, 12:50 PM

    https://iranwire.com/en/features/6446
    Quote
    On Saturday November 16, Iranians took to the streets in many cities across Iran to protest the steep increase in gas prices – and while the protests were mostly peaceful there was some clashes and even bloodshed in a handful of cases.

    The protests took many forms and the slogans chanted were different from city to city and even from street to street. In one place, people blocked the street, sat on the pavement and, as in the recent Lebanon protests, smoked water pipes and drank tea. Elsewhere protesters stopped their cars in the middle of traffic and peacefully occupied the street. And in other places they chanted slogans against inflation or against the government. Demonstrations continued all day without serious clashes or bloodshed in most cities; but in a few places, police opened fire and killed or injured several protesters.

    It was midnight on Friday, November 15 when official news agencies announced that, according to a decision made by the Supreme Council of Economic Coordination, consisting of the heads of the three branches of government, the price of un-rationed gas in Iran will rise threefold to 3,000 tomans.

    Following the news, Mohammad Bagher Nobakht, head of Iran’s Planning and Budget Organization, announced that revenues from rationing and the gas price increase on the open market – would be distributed as financial aid to more than 18 million households, or 60 million people. According to him, the level of aid offered would be between 50 to 205 thousand tomans ($5 to $25) per month, depending on the size of the household. But many economic observers say that, considering the inflationary effects of such a steep gas price increase, this aid will not be of much help to low-income families.

    It is unclear whether the government and the Supreme Council of Economic Coordination had predicted the protests – but once they began on the Friday afternoon they spread rapidly across the country. Videos of the protests circulating on social media also indicate that protests in many cases soon went beyond the price hike; Iranians also began to protest against the government itself, as well as the Supreme Leader.

    Some videos show car tires set alight or sporadic clashes between protesters and the police. The most significant unrest on Friday was in Khuzestan, an oil-rich province, which also has a high poverty rate. Ahvaz, Mahshahr, Dezful, Omidiyeh, Behbahan, Mashhad, Shiraz and Sirjan were among cities that saw protests on Friday.

    “Turn off your cars, honorable Ahvazi,” demonstrators chanted in Ahvaz. In Omidiyeh, protesters shut down the road leading out of town for several hours. In Mahshahr, angry protesters set a gas station on fire. And in Sirjan, Kerman province, police opened fired on demonstrators and killed a protester named Javad Nazari Fath-Abadi.

    The protests spread more widely still on Saturday. In some cities, people refrained from chanting radical political slogans and protested only the gas price increase. To show their discontent, they turned off their cars, left them in the middle of the street and created traffic jams. In Isfahan, protesters added an entertaining twist; pictures of one street protest there show parked cars blocking the street as people drank tea and smoked water pipes. But a later picture from Isfahan’s Zeinabieh neighborhood shows a body on the ground, covered with blood, and the voiceover in the video tells us that this person was killed by the police.

    Protesters in places such as Shiraz also focused on the gas price hike. They blocked the streets with cars – and at first no clashes between protesters and police were reported. Instead, people smiled at the police and thanked them.

    But in the afternoon the situation in Shiraz changed, turning violent when a young protester named Mehdi Nekooee was shot and killed in front of the police station in Moali-Abad Boulevard. Later pictures from Shiraz showed protesters cutting CCTV wires in the streets, tearing up pictures of Supreme Leader Ayatollah Khamenei and chanting slogans against the police and the government.

    The clashes on Saturday were not limited to Isfahan and Shiraz. Protests continued in Khorramshahr and at least two people, Abdelwahab Adgipour and Ali Ghazlavi, a 12-year-old boy, were shot and killed by police and several people were injured. In Behbahan, protests continued from Friday and, according to unconfirmed reports, at least three protesters were killed. In Sanandaj, the capital of Iranian Kurdistan, unrest continued throughout the day and it was reported that at least one person was killed and more than 20 were injured.

    Videos from Shahriar, a city in Tehran province, show the police shooting directly at demonstrators. In response, angry protesters set fire to a building belonging to the paramilitary Basij Organization, a number of police stations and a sculpture of the ring worn by Ayatollah Khomeini, founder of the Islamic Republic.

    More than 100 videos – from protests across Iran, posted on social media as the protests continued – show that in dozens of other cities, large like Tehran and small ones like Ilam, millions of people blocked the streets in protest. The protests started with chants against the gas price increases; but when they were confronted with police violence, and heard the news that protesters in other towns had been killed, their chants often became political. In some places they broke the windows of banks, police stations and government buildings; in a few cases, they also set fire to such places.

    The violence was reportedly worse in two Kurdish towns – Javanrud in Kermanshah Province and Marivan in Kurdistan – and many more protesters were killed or injured. According to the Hengaw Organization for Human Rights, a Kurdish rights group, at least 12 people in these two cities were shot and killed and many others have been injured. Hengaw added that the number of casualties in these two cities is still increasing.

    Iran’s domestic media, however, have reported Saturday protests differently from people on social media. Some have mentioned the unrest but, according to a tweet by an Iranian journalist, state news agencies have been ordered to not cover the protests. The Islamic Republic News Agency (IRNA) published one report about protests in Sirjan without any mention of a protester who had been killed. IRNA only said that violent clashes had taken place and that the police had foiled attempts to set fire to the city’s fuel depot.

    But the protests have forced some officials to respond. President Hasan Rouhani said that the revenue from increasing gas prices would be distributed among 60 million Iranians – rather than going into government coffers. Rouhani added that the government wanted to assist low-income Iranians but has previously lacked the resources and funds to do so.

    Mahmoud Vaezi, Rouhani’s chief of staff, said that the Islamic Republic’s highest officials had all approved [Persian link] the gas price increase – but some of these officials deny they had any role in the decision. According to the news site Tabnak, the Expediency Council has issued a statement denying that its secretary has supported the decision, adding that decisions over the price of gas rests with the government and parliament.

    According to some news published on social media, Judiciary Chief Ebrahim Raeesi claimed that, in the meeting of the Supreme Council of Economic Coordination, he had opposed the price increase; but Mohammad Farahani, editor-in-chief of the judiciary’s Mizan news agency, later denied this report.

    Bahram Parsaei, member of parliament from Shiraz, claimed that parliament had not been consulted about the price increase. In a series of tweets, Parsaei wrote that gas prices in Iran will correspond to prices in other countries only when the income of Iranians is comparable to the incomes of people in those countries.

    Among members of parliament, perhaps Parvaneh Salahshouri is one who has most unequivocally expressed her views on the gas price increase.

    “Since gas prices went up, people have repeatedly called and said they are worried,” she tweeted [Persian link] on Saturday. “Dear fellow Iranians: parliament has not been in charge of affairs for a long time. This decision was made among the heads of the three branches of government. We had only this half-baked pillar of democracy but we kissed it goodbye and it is gone. Shut down the next parliament.”

    Mojtaba Zolnoor, chairman of parliament’s National Security Committee, reported that enough members of parliament had agreed to introduce an emergency bill to a public session to oppose the increase in gas prices. He said that the decision to raise prices without parliament’s knowledge was against the law and would be opposed by parliament.

    Saturday’s protests, however, went beyond mere criticism. In addition to the widespread road blockages, chants and sporadic violence, some protesters also denounced Iran’s aid to Palestinian and Lebanese paramilitary groups. These incidents led to threatening responses from Iranian officials. Iran’s Attorney-General, Mohammad Jafar Montazeri, and Rouhani’s advisor Hesamodin Ashna, claimed that foreigners have instigated the protests and threatened to take action against protesters.

    Interior Minister Abdolreza Rahmani Fazli claimed that protesters had thus far been treated with “forbearance” – but threatened that if protests continued “naturally the police and security forces will do their duty.” Fazli's claim of “forbearance” coincided with reports that close to 20 protesters had been killed.

    Threatening protesters was not the end of it. Around 6:00pm Tehran-time, on Saturday, an internet outage started and gradually spread across the country. In most parts of Iran, especially in the nearly 50 cities where protests took place, it was either impossible to connect to the internet or connections were repeatedly interrupted and dropped.

    NetBlocks, a network monitoring civil society group, reported that “Iran’s largest mobile network operators including MCI, Rightel and IranCell … fell offline as of 6:00 pm (14:30 UTC) Saturday amid worsening internet shutdowns as the protests intensified.” It later reported that “Iran is in the midst of a near-total national internet shutdown as of 18:45 UTC, Saturday. Real-time network data show connectivity has fallen to just 7% of ordinary levels following twelve hours of progressive network disconnections as public protests have continued across the country.”

    As of this report, access to the internet in Iran was next to impossible.

    According to the latest reports, it was announced that schools in the provinces of Tehran, Chaharmahal and Bakhtiari, and in several cities including Isfahan, Shiraz and Behbahan, would be closed on Sunday. (Sunday is a workday in Iran.) Some Education Ministry officials have said that schools would be closed because of the cold and the snow but, except in Chaharmahal and Bakhtiari province, it seem that the protests are the true reason for schools closing.

  • Iran uprising - is the end in sight for the Islamic regime?
     Reply #206 - November 17, 2019, 07:09 PM

    https://mobile.twitter.com/BBCFattahi/status/1196134756183883776
    Quote
    Another target of #Iranian protesters: religious schools. This one, in Kazerun, was set on fire last night.

  • Iran uprising - is the end in sight for the Islamic regime?
     Reply #207 - November 17, 2019, 08:09 PM

    Video: https://mobile.twitter.com/ArminNavabi/status/1196068165379182592
    Quote
    Protestors in Iran are blocking highways to protest against the Islamic Republic. Some protestors burned down the Islamic regime's banks, police cars and buildings. The government responded by shooting and killing several demonstrators.

  • Iran uprising - is the end in sight for the Islamic regime?
     Reply #208 - November 18, 2019, 12:17 AM

    Interview with Ammar Maleki: https://mobile.twitter.com/NatashaFatah/status/1196155316531916801

    Interview with Masih Alinejad: https://mobile.twitter.com/NatashaFatah/status/1196181461746905088
  • Iran uprising - is the end in sight for the Islamic regime?
     Reply #209 - November 18, 2019, 12:23 AM

    https://mobile.twitter.com/AlirezaNader/status/1196212520488448000
    Quote
    “Islamic Republic, say hello to your end.” Revolutionary graffiti in #Iran

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