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 Topic: Iran uprising - is the end in sight for the Islamic regime?

 (Read 11676 times)
  • 12 3 ... 7 Next page « Previous thread | Next thread »
  • Iran uprising - is the end in sight for the Islamic regime?
     OP - December 30, 2017, 10:36 AM

    It looks like there’s a new wave of anti-government protests in Iran: https://mobile.twitter.com/borzou/status/946853585962364928
  • Iran protests
     Reply #1 - December 30, 2017, 10:58 AM

    https://mobile.twitter.com/MaryamNamazie/status/946736446576254977
  • Iran protests
     Reply #2 - December 30, 2017, 02:04 PM

    https://kayhan.london/fa/1396/10/08/protests-in-iran-and-the-silence-of-the-western-media
    Quote
    Something profound is happening in Iran, and the Western mass media are simply not reporting it.

    For some time now, protests by ordinary Iranians have become a daily routine. The protesters include workers who have not been paid wages or have become redundant. They include savers who have lost their savings in Iran’s many quasi-banks, which are infested with corruption and embezzlement. They include people concerned about the environmental disaster that Iran is fast turning into. They include people protesting at rising prices. They include retired pensioners whose retirement funds have been plundered by successive administrations, and people on low income who can no longer make ends meet.

    These protesters come from across the whole spectrum of Iranian society. The protests are getting bigger, and their chants are becoming more radical.

    In the early days of the 1979 revolution which swept the mullahs to power in Iran, the protests were far less frequent. There were far fewer demonstrators in isolated religious cities, and they were ignored by the mainstream population of Iran. Yet the Western mass media never missed an opportunity to report on the smallest and most insignificant of those early protests, and created a hype that eventually gained momentum.

    Thankfully today, we do not have to rely on the politically biased Western correspondents based in Iran, who seem too scared to upset the Islamic Republic and to report on anything other than good-cop-bad-cop scenarios pitting the “moderates” against the “hardliners.” Today, we have social media; every citizen is a potential reporter with a camera, and news travels faster than the foreign correspondents and “echo chambers” can say “moderates in Iran!”

    In recent weeks, protesters have been chanting much more radical slogans: cries of “Death to Rouhani” and “Down with dictatorship,” and expressions of yearning for the happier days before the 1979 revolution.

    Iranian pensioners in Isfahan protesting their dwindling retirement benefits chanted:  “What a mistake we made, by taking part in the revolution.” And on Thursday, protesters in the holy city of Mashad chanted: “Reza Shah, Bless Your Soul,” referring to the founder of the Pahlavi dynasty, Reza Shah the Great, modernizer of Iran and nemesis of the Shia clerics in Iran.

    The protesters have also been chanting against the judiciary, whose corruption and excessive powers have made them the most unpopular institution in the Islamic Republic — and that takes some doing.

    Videos posted on social media clearly show society to be extremely tense. The population are angry and have had enough. Most importantly, they are not scared anymore. They openly mock the security forces, and are finding strength in their numbers.

    On top of these protests, there is the new phenomenon of Restart, initiated by a popular former game show host on Iranian State TV, Seyed Mohammad Hosseini, who is now in exile in America. The former host called for everything that represented the regime to be attacked — whether it be a mosque, a Baseej base, or a police station, using any weapon people could get a hold of, whether it be a sledgehammer, an axe or a Molotov cocktail — to restart the country that Iran was before it became an Islamic Republic.

    Followers of Hosseini film themselves carrying out the attacks, and finish by saying: “Long live Restart and long live Hosseini.” The first such video was an attack on a mosque during the holy month of Moharram, an unthinkable act in Iran before Ayatollah Khomeini took over.  Yet such is the hatred that the clerics have created among Iran’s youth towards Islam that even a mosque in the holy month of Moharram is not safe from an arson attack.

    Restart videos posted on social media are no longer isolated attacks. They are happening more and more and throughout Iran.

    It is not the first time that the makings of a new revolution go unnoticed by the “experts,” think tanks, diplomats, reporters and such like. Almost every revolution takes these people by surprise. One of my favorite such cases is the example of the US embassy in Budapest, who, a month before the 1956 Hungarian uprising, cabled: “There is no chance of an uprising here.”

    Whether the current dissatisfaction of the Iranian population will snowball into a full-blown revolution and whether the regime still has the stamina and the capability to successfully crack down on protesters remain to be seen. But the increasing frequency of protests and the growing radicalization of these protests certainly deserves more coverage in the media  — at least as much as those small and isolated early protests that led to the 1979 Islamic revolution in Iran.

  • Iran protests
     Reply #3 - December 30, 2017, 02:27 PM

    A twitter account that may be worth following: https://mobile.twitter.com/Raman_Ghavami
  • Iran protests
     Reply #4 - December 30, 2017, 05:31 PM

    Protests are being organised on Telegram, a social media app I’d never heard of.

    https://www.bloomberg.com/amp/news/articles/2017-12-12/cryptic-russian-crusader-says-his-5-billion-app-can-t-be-bought?
    Quote
    And then there’s Iran, which recently charged Durov in absentia with crimes related to Telegram’s popularity among terrorists, human traffickers and pedophiles. Durov seems unfazed by the pressure, even from a country that still urges the murder of a novelist over a book written three decades ago.

    “I’m motivated by curiosity,” he said. “It’s super-interesting to see what it’s like to run the most popular social media platform in a country like Iran.”

    With Twitter and Facebook banned, Telegram accounts for about 40 percent of all Iranian internet traffic, according to Techrasa, a market researcher. And that’s after local wireless carriers convinced officials to ban the encrypted voice-call function Durov rolled out in April. Telegram, which is open-sourced and works on both phones and PCs, hosts 500,000 Farsi “channels” where users can post and curate all kinds of content that others can monitor for free.


    Thread: https://mobile.twitter.com/durov/status/947139460881440768

    Edit: Telegram blocks AmadNews:

    https://mobile.twitter.com/HadiNili/status/947159600700239872

    https://mobile.twitter.com/durov/status/947179988213624832

    Thread: https://mobile.twitter.com/Snowden/status/947190333540061185
    Quote
    Many don't seem to understand why I object to @Telegram having unsafe, censorable public channels in an app that is promoted as a secure messenger. Some presumed I just don't understand how channels work. So let's talk about it:

  • Iran protests
     Reply #5 - December 30, 2017, 05:39 PM

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IFkOG0koD94

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7PjcssNCWcs

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Iran protests
     Reply #6 - December 30, 2017, 05:44 PM

    Anti-government protests in Iran - Neyshabur- 28 Dec. 2017

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yWuQo27a8CU

    Iran Protests: Dezful, Dec 30, 2017

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oA_iu8qW2FQ


    Iran Protests: Khorramabad, Dec 30, 2017

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bzDI-Ga1QrY

    Iran Protests: Bandar Abbas, Dec 30, 2017

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kkZtMwaYs_A

    these are such  mass protest  in various cities of PERSIA  .,,  IT WILL SHAKE THE ROOTS OF  IRANIAN ISLAM

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Iran protests
     Reply #7 - December 30, 2017, 05:51 PM

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s3YBMK_TRbo


    Tehran, IRAN – 30 December 2017 – Anti-government protests continue for third day

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bzDI-Ga1QrY

    Iran Protests: Zanjan, Dec 30, 2017 - Third day of Public protest against high prices

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QtHRBx6Swkw

    DICK-TRATORS & DICKHEADS Ruling  so-called  Islamic nations must get out their nations and live in London and  New York.. Islam can only survive with FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION   & FREEDOM TO  QUESTION STUPID STORIES IN IT...

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Iran protests
     Reply #8 - December 30, 2017, 05:58 PM

    Now these  beards and burkhs of Persia protesting against other protests NEVER READ QURAN and NEVER UNDERSTOOD ORIGINS OF ISLAM

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mhHd6cZIgJQ

    RT German Published on Dec 30, 2017
     
    Quote
    Nationwide pro-government rallies were held in Iran on Saturday to mark the end of the riots that shook the country in 2009, state media reported. Local news agencies and social media point to anti-government protests that have been taking place for two days. --- More on our website: https://deutsch.rt.com/


    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Iran protests
     Reply #9 - December 30, 2017, 05:59 PM

    I haven’t seen any other reports to confirm this as yet.

    https://mobile.twitter.com/Raman_Ghavami/status/947164233480974340
    Quote
    #IRGC firing at the protesters in #Lorestan. I don't want to post any video on this.
    4 protesters have lost their lives, 6 wounded. Lorestan can be a nightmare for the regime. This region twice took over the capital. They're unstoppable. Thats why regime is using heavy force on them.

  • Iran protests
     Reply #10 - December 30, 2017, 06:05 PM

    https://mobile.twitter.com/Raman_Ghavami/status/947159246180900864
    Quote
    A quick update on #Zanjan. Security forces are shooting at the protesters.
    Protesters are burning banks in the city. More reports will follow.

  • Iran protests
     Reply #11 - December 30, 2017, 06:19 PM

    https://mobile.twitter.com/Raman_Ghavami/status/947169008050204674
    Quote
    #Update71- protesters in #Tehran have taken a few streets and security forces can’t enter those zones.

  • Iran protests
     Reply #12 - December 30, 2017, 06:34 PM

    Thread: https://mobile.twitter.com/HadiNili/status/947132525377449984
    Quote
    3rd day of #IranProtests; in this thread I'm going to post some of the videos that are verified by BBC about the date and location.

  • Iran protests
     Reply #13 - December 30, 2017, 06:37 PM

    Thread: https://mobile.twitter.com/MaloneySuzanne/status/946891009467830272
    Quote
    Lots of smart commentary on #Iranprotests on Twitter today. But in some circles there's an important misconception that warrants scrutiny. Specifically, the fact that the protests were sparked by economic grievances does not suggest they're apolitical.

  • Iran protests
     Reply #14 - December 30, 2017, 06:41 PM

    Thread on the left and previous outbreaks of protest in Iran: https://mobile.twitter.com/libcomorg/status/946811323651895296

    Also: https://mobile.twitter.com/Cheemzes/status/947013025122390016
  • Iran protests
     Reply #15 - December 30, 2017, 06:49 PM

    Why are people protesting in Iran?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2BRhDRrYLUM

    Quote
    Tensions are high in Iran as hundreds of people protest in multiple cities against the government's economic policies.

    Speaking to Al Jazeera from Iran's capital, Mohammad Marandi, professor at Tehran University, says US sanctions are to blame for the frustration and some Western media sources are stoking the Iranians' anger.

     
    well  you are a Professor  paid by the Islamic Republic ...   But let us not be FOOLISH.....  it is  the freedom of expression .....

    and this is from  that    The Young Turks  of AMERICA  on Why Are Protests Spreading In Iran?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XVMbJS3Xj7Q

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Iran protests
     Reply #16 - December 30, 2017, 07:34 PM

    https://mobile.twitter.com/Raman_Ghavami/status/947187806295810048
    Quote
    #Update73- The cyber force of the regime are shutting down #Telegram channels one after another. Telegram is the most effective way people are communicating just now. Maybe @telegram could help.


    https://mobile.twitter.com/Raman_Ghavami/status/947188455146127361
    Quote
    #Update74- Internet has been disabled in #Tehran.

  • Iran protests
     Reply #17 - December 30, 2017, 08:19 PM

    https://mobile.twitter.com/Raman_Ghavami/status/947197310353764353
    Quote
    #Update76- After the death of four protesters in #Lorestan, young protesters are burning police and security forces’ bases in the city. Chanting Death to (down with) Khamenei

  • Iran protests
     Reply #18 - December 30, 2017, 08:24 PM

    https://mobile.twitter.com/IranWireEnglish/status/947200174308384768
    Quote
    Like in 2009, mobile internet is cut off across Iran. Very few videos are coming out of Iran. We'll keep you posted.

  • Iran protests
     Reply #19 - December 30, 2017, 08:38 PM

    https://iranwire.com/en/features/5060
    Quote
    The street protests that have engulfed Iran since Thursday have rocked Iran’s political establishment. Small protests about economic conditions are not uncommon in the country, but these protests were different, quickly moving on to address more general political grievances and spreading to other cities. They are now the largest anti-regime protests since 2009. The demonstrations had started by attacking the reform-focused government of President Hassan Rouhani and his economic policies. In fact, by all indications, they were started by Rouhani opponents belonging to the regime’s hardline conservative faction — but they quickly grew and changed tack, sometimes getting out of hand.

    Both wings of Iran’s official politics, the Reformists and the Conservatives, have been internally divided over their responses to the street protests. Furthermore, as the protests have spread, their responses have also changed. Initially, many reformists called for the constitutional right to protest to be respected, but many have now moved on to question the motives behind the demonstrations. The conservative opponents of Rouhani, on the other hand, started by supporting the protests as a just reaction to the government’s economic policies but were quick to denounce them later on.

    One of the most controversial reactions came from Rouhani’s Vice President for Women and Family Affairs, Masoumeh Ebtekar. “Protest is a right but protesters should know who is guiding them and who their leader is,” she tweeted. Ebtekar also posted evidence that people with Twitter accounts linked to Saudi Arabia and Israel had supported the protests, and also pointed to support from an Iranian self-declared “anti-religion” tweeter based in New York.

    Rouhani’s right-hand man, Vice President Eshagh Jahangiri, had earlier led the way by dismissing the protests and denying that the economy is in bad shape. Jahangiri’s reaction was echoed by many, though not all, Rouhani-supporting newspapers in the country.

    Iran newspaper, which usually reflects the government’s view, went with the dull headline of “National Understanding for Economic Improvement” and quoted Jahangiri. The reformist Etemad headlined a quote by Jahangiri — “They will be hurt themselves” —highlighting the vice president’s warning to his political opponents that the street protests will end up threatening them. Armaane Emrooz, close to the Executives of Construction Party, Jahangiri’s party, adopted a similar headline.

    But some pro-Rouhani newspapers backed the protests. Qanoon newspaper went with the headline “People enforce Article 27,” highlighting the article in the Iranian constitution that allows protests as far as the marchers are unarmed and don’t “disrupt the foundations of Islam.” Qanoon also published an article that said: “Inefficiency of government authorities in solving people’s economic problems has led to protests by a section of society.”

    Some government figures took a more nuanced line. Hesamedin Ashena, a close advisor of Rouhani known for economically right-wing views, tweeted: “The country faces serious problems in unemployment, high prices, corruption, environment, water shortage, class difference, unequal distortion of the budget and people have the right for their voice to be heard,” but he also added, rather cryptically, “the gangs of conspiracy and deception have proved at least twice that they can fool the masses.”

    Ashena also called on “security and police forces” to “face the protests with restraint” before adding: “But, let’s remember that in any country, none of these crises have ever been solved on the streets and by using violence.”

    Azar Mansoori, a reformist politician, first tweeted: “Peaceful protest is a legal right of people…The regime has a duty to listen to people’s demands and problems,” while also calling for “calm and strengthening of national reconciliation.” In a second tweet she called for “the social hope” to be protected and warned that criticism of Rouhani from his conservative opponents will lead people away from the regime altogether.

    Among the hardliner newspapers, the Vatan-e-Emrooz newspaper, known for flashy headlines, went with the simple recommendation to “Be Responsible!” and criticized Jahangiri for his dismissal of the street protests. Javan, which usually reflects the views of the hardline-dominated paramilitary Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps, went with: “People’s economic gatherings and abuse of it by the counter-revolution.” The conservative Mashhad daily Khorasan had a similar headline: “People’s economic protests and its abuse by the opportunists.”

    Many are waiting for official reactions from Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, the former president whose campaign against corruption recently targeted the influential Larijani family, a conservative clan that is in somewhat of an alliance with Rouhani. An unverified account on Twitter highlighted part of Ahmadinejad’s speech in the southern city of Bushehr on Thursday: “Everyone should be careful. Any tension, clash, wrongdoing and insult should be condemned and has nothing to do with us or the nation.”

    Friday prayer leaders around the country, whose line is coordinated by offices close to the Supreme Leader Ayatollah Khamenei, generally acknowledged the economic demands but condemned the “infiltration” of protests, although with varying emphasis.

    Ahmad Alamolhoda, the hardliner prayer leader in Mashhad, said the protests that had started in the city were “rightful” and added that “you shouldn’t make people so fed up that they take to the streets.” But he also warned: “One shouldn’t come out to the streets whenever anyone calls for it. The country’s security matters and our life problems shouldn't become a tool for the enemy’s victory.” He specifically criticized the slogans that targeted the Iranian presence in Syria as “inappropriate.”

    In other cities in Khorasan Razavi province, including Mashhad, prayer leaders had different takes. Kazem Tabatabayi, the prayer leader for Kashmar, said the gatherings “used the excuse of high prices” but were really a plot by “the US, the Israelis and the anti-Islam” contingent to “overthrow the regime.” He called on “the government and security forces” to “stand up to these people” and not let “a bunch of no-lifes disrupt the country.”

    But while the top figures in both factions seem to be befuddled by the protests, some activists called for reformists to take a different approach.

    Foad Shams, a left-wing activist in Karaj who has electorally supported the Rouhani government and his allies, said Rouhani’s “ideologically-tinged neoliberal economics” had led to the current climate.

    “If the Reformists had a correct political outlook and a truly people-centered economic perspective instead of their current ideological neoliberalism, they should have by now tried to score concessions in the interest of people, not becoming a mouthpiece by attacking people’s #General-Demonstration”— using the hashtag protesters have deployed to garner support.

    The current street protests have mounted a significant challenge to Iran’s established politics, especially since their anti-regime fervor seems to go beyond the agendas of both official factions. In 2009, the mass movement that was suppressed with extraordinary violence essentially supported one wing of the regime, and pitted it against the other. The leader of that movement, former prime minister Mir-Hossein Mousavi, was a rare figure in the establishment in that he both defended political liberties and stood for economic justice in line with strong revolutionary ideals. This time around, the anger of the protests seem to be rawer and their call for social justice contradicts  the economic orthodoxy of both the reformists and the hardliners. How official politics responds to this challenge will play a big role in determining the future — that of the protests, but also that of the country’s key politicians.

  • Iran protests
     Reply #20 - December 30, 2017, 09:18 PM

    https://mobile.twitter.com/maryamnayebyazd/status/947168900088848389
    Quote
    This map shows all the areas in Iran where protests occurred in the past three days.

  • Iran protests
     Reply #21 - December 30, 2017, 09:23 PM

    More videos of today’s protests: https://mobile.twitter.com/maryamnayebyazd/status/947172333453705216
  • Iran protests
     Reply #22 - December 30, 2017, 09:29 PM

    This is unconfirmed and if true it isn’t clear what it involves.

    https://mobile.twitter.com/AlirezaNader/status/947217147658465281
    Quote
    Reports that Iranians have taken over the city of Kashan #IranUprising


    Edit: https://mobile.twitter.com/JulianRoepcke/status/947232199572643841
    Quote
    I checked the reports on #Kashan (کاشان) for one hour and could not find any confirming evidence beyond the few pictures and videos.
    Doesn't mean it didn't happen, but as many put me as "the source" of that claim - which I am not(!) - I rather deleted some related tweets.

  • Iran protests
     Reply #23 - December 30, 2017, 09:36 PM

    Thread: https://mobile.twitter.com/borzou/status/947211853192749057
    Quote
    Tehran-based social scientist: "I don't know what to think. This time it's very radical. It's very different from 2009. I'm scared. There's zero leadership. I don't know what's going on."
    “There is zero mention of Mousavi or Khatami. There is zero space for reformists."

  • Iran protests
     Reply #24 - December 30, 2017, 09:53 PM

    https://mobile.twitter.com/HadiNili/status/947198869045202944
    Quote
    Iranian users now reporting difficulties to connect to internet; slower connection on landlines & no internet connection on cellular networks for some. Also intensified jamming of satellite TVs where ppl follow the news from channels like @bbcpersian.


    https://mobile.twitter.com/fresh_sadegh/status/947220877795618816
    Quote
    1- About 2 hours ago I was in streets & highways north of #Tehran, I didn’t see EVEN police forces out. So right now things seem quite normal. 2-There were internet disruption about 2 hours ago, but it’s back now. I’m on twitter via VPN.

  • Iran protests
     Reply #25 - December 30, 2017, 10:11 PM

    https://mobile.twitter.com/SaeedKD/status/947213955646279680
    Quote
    Protester from inside Tehran University tells me students are puzzled how the protests spread so fast, especially that it is happening more in provinces than the capital. "But we're not getting leads from anyone," he insists.


    https://mobile.twitter.com/SaeedKD/status/947226442894598144
    Quote
    Judging from videos & having witnessed 2009 on the ground, these are the biggest simultaneous protests in Iranian provinces in my lifetime. But many are wary of how it started and spread so quickly. Even a lot of critics remain puzzled, sceptical. How will Rouhani handle this?

  • Iran protests
     Reply #26 - December 31, 2017, 09:27 AM

    Maryam Namazie on the protests
    https://m.youtube.com/watch?feature=youtu.be&v=hbRMKKYYqGs
  • Iran protests
     Reply #27 - December 31, 2017, 09:37 AM

    Thread: https://mobile.twitter.com/Raman_Ghavami/status/947282733998452736
    Quote
    #Thread_On_IranProtests
    1) Yesterday peaceful demonstrations organically reached 27 provinces. This protests hit the stronghold of the Supreme Leader, most of the top #IRGC commanders as well as the "Hardliners" and has hit a raw nerve in #Tehran.

  • Iran protests
     Reply #28 - December 31, 2017, 11:16 AM

    https://mobile.twitter.com/fariborzpooya/status/947406266795724800
    Quote
    Coordinating Committee for Women's Right in Iran calls on all women to collectively join the demonstrations everywhere without Hejab.

    The end of the Rule of Hejab is here; unveil the protests.

    We do not want this anti-women regime!

    End compulsory veiling now!

  • Iran protests
     Reply #29 - December 31, 2017, 11:20 AM

    Thread: https://mobile.twitter.com/borzou/status/947240364284530693
  • 12 3 ... 7 Next page « Previous thread | Next thread »