Skip navigation
Sidebar -

Advanced search options →

Welcome

Welcome to CEMB forum.
Please login or register. Did you miss your activation email?

Donations

Help keep the Forum going!
Click on Kitty to donate:

Kitty is lost

Recent Posts


Vikkings Muslim
by zeca
Today at 10:32 AM

WHERE IS ALLAH? WHERE IS ...
Today at 02:18 AM

Qur'anic studies today
Today at 12:25 AM

Random Islamic History Po...
by zeca
Yesterday at 11:32 PM

Are Hijabs really a choic...
Yesterday at 05:48 PM

Please help me debunk thi...
Yesterday at 05:23 PM

What is your opinion of L...
Yesterday at 04:39 PM

Daphne Caruana Galizia an...
by zeca
Yesterday at 11:37 AM

The masked arab Youtube i...
October 18, 2017, 07:11 PM

Reading Quran And Inquiri...
October 18, 2017, 05:12 PM

Venezuelan President is C...
October 18, 2017, 03:48 PM

Harvey Weinstein
by zeca
October 18, 2017, 11:32 AM

Theme Changer

 Topic: What do people think of this article?

 (Read 685 times)
  • 1« Previous thread | Next thread »
  • What do people think of this article?
     OP - May 17, 2017, 07:34 AM

    Is there some truth to it, or is it a western romanticizing of islam?

    http://archive.is/YZ9Fc
  • What do people think of this article?
     Reply #1 - May 17, 2017, 09:34 AM

    Male prophets: 124000
    Female prophets: 0
  • What do people think of this article?
     Reply #2 - May 17, 2017, 11:02 AM

    Is there some truth to it, or is it a western romanticizing of islam?

    http://archive.is/YZ9Fc

      well put some on post for the readers

    Quote
    Muslims Are the True Feminists

    If we want to be respected as women and taken seriously in all our endeavors we should look to a new source; Muslim women. Muslim women, as well as Muslim men, see every body as a sacred temple, especially the female body. Opposed to exposing themselves, it is through modesty.    When we think of modern feminists we should stray away from the new American trends and start looking to what we have always thought as a contradiction; Muslim feminists.

    Contrary to American popular belief, Islam has a culture and history of women empowerment. In the Qur’an, which is believed to be God’s word told to Prophet Muhammad, women and men are described as equals in everyday actions and responsibilities. When it comes to family, charity, children, sex, and much more, a man and a woman have the same duties and that is to continue on the straight path.

    Quote
    Early Islamic women kept this idea alive. The first Muslim woman was Khadija, Mohammed’s first wife. Without her influence, Islam might not have emerged as successfully as it did. Khadija was a business woman and a land owner in the lands of Arabia. When Mohammed was given revelations, it was Khadija that ensured him that he was not going insane, but that he was a chosen one. It was Khadija that pushed Mohammed to listen to God and the angels that were trying to communicate with him and to not run in fear. It was Khadija that gave Muhammad the support and confidence in his development as becoming God’s last prophet. Khadija, a woman, was the strength that allowed Islam to fully bloom. Just this one example gives us a view on how true Muslim women are; outspoken, driven, certain and courageous, the epitome of a feminist.


    So it’s no surprise to see Muslim woman today modeling themselves after these prominent female figures. Muslim girls look towards these instances of strength for guidance in this scary, patriarchal society. These modern women are not afraid to go against the grain in the name of their belief like wearing the hijab to covey their religious devotion. Hijab is the headscarf that is worn by Muslim woman and no; it is not supposed to be forced on them by their fathers and husbands. Wearing or not wearing the Hijab reflects a Muslim woman’s own a personal choice.  

    That stupid   23 year old Gabby Aossey  who converted to Islam  for whatever is the reason   read very little of Quran, hadith,  women In Islam and Islamic history..    for that matter she has NOT READ ABOUT ANY FAITH ..faith heads .. and  .and how faith controls/controlled   the human society since the  human being walked out of jungles and start telling stories of god/prophets and prophecies

    Quote
    Gabby Aossey is a twenty-three year old writer. She was born in Iowa City, Iowa but raised on the beach in Carlsbad, California. Her passions include human rights and social justice, playing music, hot yoga and enjoying the company of the people in her life. When she is not writing and reading, Gabby loves watching Quentin Tarantino movies and New Girl with her puppy, Kevin.


    What is that Hot Yoga and cold yoga  business?? .. nowadays there are dime a dozen   20 year old  young women on internet who converted into Islam for whatever is the romantic reason   and  blog/write such nonsense  with no facts

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • What do people think of this article?
     Reply #3 - May 17, 2017, 11:03 AM

    Dumb article, as expected.
  • What do people think of this article?
     Reply #4 - May 17, 2017, 11:12 AM

    Dumb article, as expected.

      Not just one ..many such nonsense stories were/are spread all over by these faith heads for the past 1000s of years

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/author/gabby-aossey

    Propaganda  worked in the past and works even today., And it works because  good people do not question as many of them are busy with their lives..

    Hence  I often say   "do not let silence become your legacy"  and never stop questioning  ....

    http://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-39946722

    http://bundu-dia-kongo.org/history/messangers-prophets/muanda-nsemi.html

    That is new story ..new prophet  ...  and it is from  today's BBC news..

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • What do people think of this article?
     Reply #5 - May 18, 2017, 05:11 AM

    I guess I'm trying to be fair and see if there is some legitimacy to that point of view.  I usually find that most people have their ideological blind spots, are wrong about a lot of things, but have some valid points or at least valid concerns.  I wanted to post it her to see the response from female ex-muslims before I made my own judgement.

    My hunch-  based on observing some trends- is that amongst left progressives there is sort of a "sanitized" version of islam that is being promoted as the "true" islam to contrast with the islamist vision.

     I have mixed feelings about this. On the one hand, it seems to be a way of glossing over problems with islam.  On the other hand, promoting a "better" version of islam that is more egalitarian with regards to gender seems like it could be a good thing, especially since "just get everybody to acknowledge their religion, which is so closely tied into their sense of cultural identity is false" doesn't seem like a viable strategy.

    It reminds me a bit of the western interaction with buddhism.  Modern buddhism even in asia was heavily influenced by western colonialism- progressives of the time liked certain aspects of the religion and wanted to get rid of other aspects that wouldn't qualify it as a "world religion" as opposed to "paganism" under some treaty that stated the two should be treated differently with different social consequences for the adherent.  It is from this interaction that a lot of the buddhist histories we know no are formed, with that humanist aspects emphasized and the hindu roots de-emphasized.  When american counterculture re-embraced buddhism, they altered it even further, but they were altering a product that was already heavily influence by western enlightment philosophy.

    I wonder if these types of articles and things we've been seeing in progressive academia could be the beggining of a similar process.

    The situation is very different however, as I doubt many muslims in muslim dominated countries will assimilate this, but it could theoretically become the default "western muslim" meaning of islam over time, which would be an improvement over the traditional patriarchial aspects.

    What do people think?  Could this be a possibility?  Or will it remain the exclusive provence of social justice warriors?

    Is this just wishful thinking?
  • What do people think of this article?
     Reply #6 - May 18, 2017, 05:15 AM

    Yeezevee- what does "faithhead" mean?  Is it just a term for the religious?

    To answer your question about yoga, hot yoga is yoga performed under high temperature conditions, like in a sauna.

    Cold yoga is the opposite.

    I don't do yoga, but my guess would be the idea is different ways of being aware of your body/ hot trend
  • What do people think of this article?
     Reply #7 - May 19, 2017, 01:01 AM

    There is a sanitized version of Islam, in apologist lit. But it doesn't hold a lot of water on close inspection. 

    However, Islam is not a monoculture. The current dominant trend being propagated by the Al Saud is only one legitimate version of Islam.

    What has happened to Islam is wealth. The Al Saud used wealth to distribute their version of Islam worldwide and thanks to them the local versions (always less strict and more tolerant) are dying out.

    Islam has had rich traditions, historically, but I am not sure you can say women were empowered by them. Every justification for that claim seems to reference Jahiliyya, so I use that as a sort of measuring stick. If it is better than Jahiliyya, then that is really not saying much and the credit heaped upon Islam for that is hollow.

    However, Islam as a living religion is only how it is being interpreted. Islam is not only a book or an idea, it is a community and a tradition, too.  If Amina Wadud can do it, so can others.


    Don't let Hitler have the street.
  • What do people think of this article?
     Reply #8 - May 19, 2017, 01:03 AM

    There are a million flavors of dawahganda. Rope em in, and they can figure out what it's really about later. And its so surprising that converts have a high turnover rate...

    how fuck works without shit??


    Let's Play Chess!

    harakaat, friend, RIP
  • What do people think of this article?
     Reply #9 - May 19, 2017, 01:06 AM

    Islam has had rich traditions, historically, but I am not sure you can say women were empowered by them. Every justification for that claim seems to reference Jahiliyya, so I use that as a sort of measuring stick. If it is better than Jahiliyya, then that is really not saying much and the credit heaped upon Islam for that is hollow.


    Well to add to that, how much do we really know about Jahiliyya? Especially from a source that is non-Islamic, as an Islamic one would obviously have something to gain by painting a certain sort of picture.

    how fuck works without shit??


    Let's Play Chess!

    harakaat, friend, RIP
  • What do people think of this article?
     Reply #10 - May 19, 2017, 01:37 AM

    Yes, that is an entire debate, right there.

    Don't let Hitler have the street.
  • What do people think of this article?
     Reply #11 - May 19, 2017, 01:29 PM

    Yeezevee- what does "faithhead" mean?  Is it just a term for the religious?
    .................

      well I use that word for religious as well those who do not believe in  regions/organized religions  dear DaveK.   I consider religions/faiths are nothing but explorable hypothesis/proposals  open to question .,  And I call  all  those brainless heads((however intelligent  they may be or however powerful they may be in  the society )) that  do not allow  others to question their faiths/hypotheses...   it could be about  about that super duper god... or I also use that word quite often to those    who  proposes  some  theory/theories  (scientific/ political or social) such as biological origins .. origin of life .. origins of universe...etc..etc....and do not allow others to question them and their theory.

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • What do people think of this article?
     Reply #12 - May 19, 2017, 02:36 PM

    Reading this, I immediately heard Lois CK's imitation of his old, Boston teacher "it's retaaaaarded" inside my head.

    But I'll be back with a more mature and intellectual response, later...

    "The healthiest people I know are those who are the first to label themselves fucked up." - three
  • What do people think of this article?
     Reply #13 - May 20, 2017, 08:50 AM

    ^^I had a similar reaction. I could write a long post which refutes the article point by point but reading it again fries the brain. I doubt that anyone here actually believes any of that.
  • What do people think of this article?
     Reply #14 - May 20, 2017, 09:13 AM

    I guess I'm trying to be fair and see if there is some legitimacy to that point of view.  I usually find that most people have their ideological blind spots, are wrong about a lot of things, but have some valid points or at least valid concerns.  I wanted to post it her to see the response from female ex-muslims before I made my own judgement.


    I'll try then: the simple answer is no. I'm not saying that a woman cannot be perfectly happy wearing the hijab and cannot choose to wear it purely out of her own devotion to her god. I am not saying that a woman who wears a hijab cannot support and be an advocate for gender equality either. Being a former hijabi, I know better than to judge them all based on their appearance, so I avoid doing that as much as possible. That being said: no, the hijab is not liberating in any sense of the word. When a woman wears a hijab, she doesn't suddenly free herself from society's beauty standards. Rather, people (Muslims and non-Muslims) will monitor her actions and expect certain behaviours of her. Even if she isn't being judged for her looks, she is being judged for what she is wearing on her head. Many people will expect her to be pious, modest, quiet, submissive, or to fit into all of the other dozens of stereotypes that are attached to Muslim women. Societal beauty standards and being judged for not having the perfect body does make life harder for women, yes. But wearing the hijab makes it even harder, tenfold.

    And it's not to say that hijabi women don't get judged for their looks either. Many of them wear makeup, jewellery, and tight clothing. There are several YouTube tutorials on hijab styles because they also want to look good. And even women who are covered from head to foot in black still dress nicely and style their hair under their veils. I lived in a conservative Islamic country at a point in my life and the women were  even more stylish that British women when we went to all-female gatherings. The young girls would wear heavy perfume, had their faces caked in makeup and wore some rather revealing clothing at times. At many times this was done to impress the mothers of potential suitors, that was how some of them got married. So it's not to say that veiled women are not subject to societal beauty standards as well, only that they had the veil and all of the societal pressures which comes with it on top of that.
  • 1« Previous thread | Next thread »