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 Topic: Jerusalem (Temple Mount)

 (Read 531 times)
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  • Jerusalem (Temple Mount)
     OP - January 23, 2017, 10:20 AM

    Was in Jerusalem last year.  We had a personal tour by an atheist jewish guy.  So we got a very one sided prospective of things.  Such an interesting place, but SO troubled.

    I was wondering do Muslims from outside visit the temple mount?  I only saw Jewish people on the plane over.  But it's such an important site, I'd have thought Muslims would risk the trouble and travel?

    Also, and possibly no point in asking this because it's too difficult a question (but you're a smart bunch).  But how did one rock become the site of such significance to two religions?  Is there (all these years later) enough actual evidence to unpick it's history?




  • Jerusalem (Temple Mount)
     Reply #1 - January 23, 2017, 01:07 PM

    How did it become of such significance to two (or three) religions? Simple really because they are basically the same religion. Just variant and heretical versions of the same religion. Each later one appropriating parts of the old one and moulding it to a new saviour/prophet.

    The stone itself is just part of the layer of limestone in that area formed millions of years ago. The site had access to water and so was a good site to build a place of worship. That place of worship became an important part of the Jewish religion and legend - which as I say then became an important part of the various offshoots of Judaism - namely Christianity and Islam.

    No mystery really.

    Hell is an absurd & wicked fiction. You're not a bad person for rejecting something that's cruel, irrational, unjust & lacks evidence. You have nothing to fear. Nothing to feel ashamed about. Enjoy your life. Do the best you can. Make yourself & others happy.
  • Jerusalem (Temple Mount)
     Reply #2 - January 23, 2017, 09:47 PM

    The only thing I'd add is that Christians generally looked on the Temple Mount with contempt for a long time.  Its ruins were a symbol of the Jews' perverse disobedience and Christ-killing, which God punished by sending the Romans to obliterate Jerusalem and expel the Jews (the Qur'an of course tells that same classic anti-Jewish polemic in Q 17:1-10).

    After the Third Roman-Jewish war, there basically was nothing left of Jerusalem.  It was made into an uninhabited parking lot, and the Jews were permanently expelled.

    Christianity was focused on the spiritual Jerusalem, in heaven.  Only with Constantine's building of new Christian monuments in Jerusalem in the 4th century did the idea of a Christian Jerusalem on Earth emerge, and it emerged in very different form, now tied to the specific places of Christ's physical death and resurrection, which is why they left the Temple Mount vacant despite plastering Jerusalem with Christian shrines--- the Temple had been replaced by Christ, and its devastated state was a sign of God's disdain for the Jews and their refusal to accept and obey God's message.

    The Qur'an basically inherits the standard late antique Christian view of Jerusalem, except that in quranic theology the most repugnant thing in the world is to imagine that mankind was saved by the death and resurrection of Jesus.  So the Muslims basically returned their sacred geography to the Temple Mount, in keeping with their idea of a pure-and-original Abrahamic covenant that was prior to, and superior to, the Jewish and Christian faiths.  As always, Islam saw itself as the 'corrected' and 'original' faith.  That meant it had to correct the sacred geography of the Holy Land as well.

    So strangely enough the Islamic focus on the Temple Mount was probably more of a counter-Christian move, displacing Christian sacred geography by going to the 'source,' than a true Judaism-imitation move.

    And this function, to my mind, explains why the Dome of the Rock is so architecturally strange (including being a carbon-clone of the Kathisma church) and why its inscriptions seem addressed primarily at correcting Christians.  Its importance was as a counter-Christian declaration.
  • Jerusalem (Temple Mount)
     Reply #3 - January 24, 2017, 08:44 AM

    Thanks Zaotar - excellent clarification!

    Hell is an absurd & wicked fiction. You're not a bad person for rejecting something that's cruel, irrational, unjust & lacks evidence. You have nothing to fear. Nothing to feel ashamed about. Enjoy your life. Do the best you can. Make yourself & others happy.
  • Jerusalem (Temple Mount)
     Reply #4 - January 24, 2017, 02:09 PM

    Thanks Zaotar - excellent clarification!

    well  Zaotar  picks that MOUNT stroy in the middles far away from  how  it started.,  I tell you Temple Mount story   is  ALL ABOUT MOUNTING ... it started with mounting ...

    I say historian need to rewrite all these faith stories again..




    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Jerusalem (Temple Mount)
     Reply #5 - March 23, 2017, 10:45 PM

    The only thing I'd add is that Christians generally looked on the Temple Mount with contempt for a long time.  Its ruins were a symbol of the Jews' perverse disobedience and Christ-killing, which God punished by sending the Romans to obliterate Jerusalem and expel the Jews (the Qur'an of course tells that same classic anti-Jewish polemic in Q 17:1-10).......

    And this function, to my mind, explains why the Dome of the Rock is so architecturally strange (including being a carbon-clone of the Kathisma church) and why its inscriptions seem addressed primarily at correcting Christians.  Its importance was as a counter-Christian declaration.


    Stunning post!!!! How did you acquire that level of knowledge? 
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