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Theme Changer

 Topic: Shahab Ahmed, RIP

 (Read 1342 times)
  • 1« Previous thread | Next thread »
  • Shahab Ahmed, RIP
     OP - May 15, 2016, 03:22 PM

    We lost a scholar recently: Shahab Ahmed. One of many secular subcontinentals who can no longer survive in Pakistan, which is tragic itself. But it was leukemia who took this one.

    Here's a  book coming out this year: Before Islamic Orthodoxy: The Satanic Verses in the Thought of the Earliest Muslim Community (ca. 632-800), which I really want to get my hands on. Also @holland_tom's twitter has been pasting quotes from "What Is Islam?", an overview for the rest of us.
  • Shahab Ahmed, RIP
     Reply #1 - May 15, 2016, 03:55 PM

    We lost a scholar recently: Shahab Ahmed. One of many secular subcontinentals who can no longer survive in Pakistan, which is tragic itself. But it was leukemia who took this one.

    Here's a  book coming out this year: Before Islamic Orthodoxy: The Satanic Verses in the Thought of the Earliest Muslim Community (ca. 632-800), which I really want to get my hands on. Also @holland_tom's twitter has been pasting quotes from "What Is Islam?", an overview for the rest of us.

       he died young  just 48.... indeed he was an indepedent thinker 

    http://www.councilofexmuslims.com/index.php?topic=28609.msg845058#msg845058

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Shahab Ahmed, RIP
     Reply #2 - May 15, 2016, 04:08 PM

    I forgot your post in that thread, yeez; sorry for that. I'd have mentioned it otherwise. Good set of links over there.
  • Shahab Ahmed, RIP
     Reply #3 - May 15, 2016, 05:11 PM

    I forgot your post in that thread, yeez; sorry for that. I'd have mentioned it otherwise. Good set of links over there.

    No..no..you don't need to be sorry for that Zimriel.,  you should not.,  we can mention and  make folders in web on  such people as many as we want., In fact he was a very quite guy when he was alive...  I am glad you opened a folder for him so folks can add his contributions on understanding of early Islam.

    and  and that is what is needed at the present times...  not gibberish from harun yahoos.,....   Zakir Jokers and and muslim geeks   .............. Hamza  tortillas.....

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Shahab Ahmed, RIP
     Reply #4 - May 15, 2016, 11:57 PM

    Natasha Shahid explores Dr Shahab Ahmed's works and the tragedy  on his demise at   fridaytimes.com



    Quote
    It’s not every day that a Pakistani national is inducted by the prestigious Harvard University to teach its meritorious students, but one man managed to garner this faith by not one but two Ivy League schools: the Singapore-born Pakistani Dr Shahab Ahmed, who served at both Harvard and Princeton.  Born in Singapore on December 11, 1966 to Pakistani parents, Ahmed was raised in Malaysia and sent to Surrey, UK, to pursue his O and A Level studies at a British boarding school. -

    So despite being raised in every country other than Pakistan, cricket – the love of every Pakistani’s life – managed to make it through to Shahab Ahmed’s life.

    After A Level, Ahmed went back to Malaysia and attained a degree in Law from International Islamic University, Kuala Lumpur, followed by a Bachelor’s and a Master’s degrees in Arabic Studies from American University, Cairo. Between the two, Shahab Ahmed came to work as a journalist in Pakistan, where he claimed to have played football with a six-and-a-half-feet tall Arab, whom his teammates called “the Shaykh” – possibly Osama bin Laden.

    From Cairo, Shahab Ahmed went to Princeton where he attained a doctorate in Islamic Studies. After the PhD, Dr Ahmed went to Harvard for Post-doctorate studies, and continued to teach there until recently. Being a man of diverse interests, he taught Islamic Studies as well as Law at Harvard University. He also took a year-long leave from Harvard to teach at Islamabad’s International Islamic University during the academic year 2007-08, and planned to return to teach in Pakistan. But fate saw to it that many of his plans remained unfulfilled, and his career could never achieve the bloom that it looked to be destined for.

    In June this year Dr Shahab Ahmed was diagnosed with a rare form of leukaemia. Despite plans for getting him a bone marrow transplant with his sister – London-based gynaecologist Dr Shahla Ahmed – the willing donor. She flew into Cambridge, Massachusetts, from London to donate bone marrow to her brother, but his deteriorating condition made the transplant impossible.

    While still ill, Shahab married his fiancée Nora Lessersohn, a History and Middle Eastern Studies’ PhD candidate at Harvard University, on August 1. Doctors’ efforts and family’s support proved to be insufficient and Dr Shahab Ahmed left the world on September 17, 2015. He leaves behind a wife and a range of cutting edge Islamic studies research works – his gift to the world of academia.


    well he was one of those lucky unlucky guys traveled all over the world and lost his life to rare blood disorder  .. parents doctors ..sister doctor.. girl friend/wife Ph. D from US of A and he himself was educated  in  Princeton and  Harvard Universities..  I am surehe must have worked with dr. patricia crone ...  ...read the rest at link..  

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Shahab Ahmed, RIP
     Reply #5 - April 29, 2018, 02:03 PM

           

    Quote
    One of the most controversial episodes in the life of the Prophet Muhammad concerns an incident in which he allegedly mistook words suggested by Satan as divine revelation. Known as the Satanic verses, these praises to the pagan deities contradict the Islamic belief that Allah is one and absolute. Muslims today―of all sects―deny that the incident of the Satanic verses took place. But as Shahab Ahmed explains, Muslims did not always hold this view.

    Before Orthodoxy wrestles with the question of how religions establish truth―especially religions such as Islam that lack a centralized authority to codify beliefs. Taking the now universally rejected incident of the Satanic verses as a case study in the formation of Islamic orthodoxy, Ahmed shows that early Muslims, circa 632 to 800 CE, held the exact opposite belief. For them, the Satanic verses were an established fact in the history of the Prophet. Ahmed offers a detailed account of the attitudes of Muslims to the Satanic verses in the first two centuries of Islam and traces the chains of transmission in the historical reports known as riwāyah.

    Touching directly on the nature of Muhammad’s prophetic visions, the interpretation of the Satanic verses incident is a question of profound importance in Islam, one that plays a role in defining the limits of what Muslims may legitimately say and do―issues crucial to understanding the contemporary Islamic world.

       That is what that Amazon  jungle  says   world.[/quote]that is what  Amazon jungle says and this is what harvard.edu says
     
    Quote
    One of the most controversial episodes in the life of the Prophet Muhammad concerns an incident in which he allegedly mistook words suggested by Satan as divine revelation. Known as the Satanic verses, these praises to the pagan deities contradict the Islamic belief that Allah is one and absolute. Muslims today—of all sects—deny that the incident of the Satanic verses took place. But as Shahab Ahmed explains, Muslims did not always hold this view.

    Before Orthodoxy wrestles with the question of how religions establish truth—especially religions such as Islam that lack a centralized authority to codify beliefs. Taking the now universally rejected incident of the Satanic verses as a case study in the formation of Islamic orthodoxy, Ahmed shows that early Muslims, circa 632 to 800 CE, held the exact opposite belief. For them, the Satanic verses were an established fact in the history of the Prophet. Ahmed offers a detailed account of the attitudes of Muslims to the Satanic verses in the first two centuries of Islam and traces the chains of transmission in the historical reports known as riwāyah.

    Touching directly on the nature of Muhammad’s prophetic visions, the interpretation of the Satanic verses incident is a question of profound importance in Islam, one that plays a role in defining the limits of what Muslims may legitimately say and do—issues crucial to understanding the contemporary Islamic world.


    I  didn't even  realize that book got published  and  no one wrote anything  on that in LAND  OF PURE ...

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
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