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Theme Changer

 Topic: Random Islamic History Posts

 (Read 145886 times)
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  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #630 - June 06, 2021, 01:06 PM

    Anton Howes - Did the Ottomans Ban Print? https://antonhowes.substack.com/p/age-of-invention-did-the-ottomans

    Anton Howes - Why Didn't the Ottomans Print More? https://antonhowes.substack.com/p/age-of-invention-why-didnt-the-ottomans
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #631 - June 17, 2021, 08:42 AM

    Thread: https://mobile.twitter.com/Tweetistorian/status/1405331983341850626
    Quote
    Earlier I promised a thread on when most people converted to Islam.  125 years ago Thomas Arnold simply assumed that most Middle Easterners converted to Islam within 50 years of Muhammad's death. Most non-scholars still think Muhammad came, then boom, everyone's Muslim!

    Fifty years later, Daniel Dennett (not the philosopher, his father) published a study which (inter alia) pointed out the lack of evidence for conversion in the Umayyad period, leading him to conclude that most people converted to Islam around 750, the Abbasid revolution.

    In 1979, Richard Bulliet published Conversion to Islam in the Medieval Period: An Essay in Quantitative History, which pushed the timeline back even farther.  He suggested that Iran became 90% or so Muslim by around 890 CE, but Iraq & Syria took about a century longer.

    When I criticize Bulliet's argument, it is important to keep in mind that he sharpened the regional focus that Dennett had introduced, and that he was pushing later the timeline that scholars presumed before. On these points, my complaint is that he didn't go far enough!

    There is a difference between historical arguments based on interpreting evidence and the numerical arguments advanced by Bulliet: when interpretive arguments fail, they are usually approximately correct, but when the wrong math is used, the true answer can be unrelated!

    Outside of Iran, Bulliet's conversion curves were based on essentially two points: an assumed 3% of the population converted by 64 AH, and the calculated peak of "Muslim names" the moveable parameter establishing when he assumes 84% of the population had converted.

    But as I pointed out elsewhere, at least 3 of the uniquely "Muslim names" were not uniquely Muslim
    ( https://mobile.twitter.com/Tweetistorian/status/1405214849760739331 )

    Furthermore, outside of Iran he is using essentially one primary source: al-Dhahabi's Kitab al-I`bar, and its abbreviation by Ibn al-`Imad.

    If we take out the mistaken use of "Muslim names," his method would imply that, by the time these biographical dictionaries were authored, the population of each region was not only 100% Muslim, but also 100% ulama. That didn't happen by 1348, nor even 1679!

    Imagine trying to do US demography from the ancestors of Christian seminary professors.

    The odd thing is that despite these errors, and 42 years later, the book continues to be cited, as the last systematic attempt to grapple with when the population converted to Islam.

    The problem is the book's math is wrong, so it tells us nothing. We simply don't know when most of the Middle East had converted to Islam (or other factors like immigration, different birth-rates).

    I took a different tack, using geographies rather than biographies.

    I learned that Islamization happened very locally, not at the scale of large regions, but individual villages or neighborhoods.

    There was no large-scale "tipping-point," because 51% doesn't matter outside of a democracy. We probably couldn't distinguish 45% from 55%.

    But in Syria there were still very few rural/village mosques around 1000 CE. In an agrarian society, the bulk of the population is rural. If the bulk of the population of Syria in 1000 CE had no mosques, it seems hard to believe the majority were Muslim, let alone 90%.

    Iraq is less clear, but there I found evidence that the ecclesiastical hierarchy and monastic system was not significantly reduced by 1000 CE, which I would expect to see if 90% of the Christian population had converted to Islam and stopped their donations.

    Egypt was long assumed to have become majority Muslim after the failure of the last Coptic revolt in the 830s, based on a remark by al-Maqrizi (d. 1412). But in 1973 Friedmann pointed out that this misreads al-Maqrizi's Arabic. It refers not to conversion, but victory!

    So we must take seriously the possibility that Muslims were a demographic minority even after 1000 CE, even in areas that remained under Muslim rule. This different context may reshape our understanding of how religion functioned in society (to be continued...)


    Also this thread: https://mobile.twitter.com/Tweetistorian/status/1405239176086306819
    Quote
    When did the Middle East become Muslim?

  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #632 - June 17, 2021, 12:04 PM

    Thread: https://mobile.twitter.com/Tweetistorian/status/1405331983341850626
    Also this thread: https://mobile.twitter.com/Tweetistorian/status/1405239176086306819

    Quote
    Earlier I promised a thread on when most people converted to Islam.  125 years ago Thomas Arnold simply assumed that most Middle Easterners converted to Islam within 50 years of Muhammad's death. Most non-scholars still think Muhammad came, then boom, everyone's Muslim!

    Fifty years later, Daniel Dennett (not the philosopher, his father) published a study which (inter alia) pointed out the lack of evidence for conversion in the Umayyad period, leading him to conclude that most people converted to Islam around 750, the Abbasid revolution.

    In 1979, Richard Bulliet published Conversion to Islam in the Medieval Period: An Essay in Quantitative History, which pushed the timeline back even farther.  He suggested that Iran became 90% or so Muslim by around 890 CE, but Iraq & Syria took about a century longer.

    When I criticize Bulliet's argument, it is important to keep in mind that he sharpened the regional focus that Dennett had introduced, and that he was pushing later the timeline that scholars presumed before. On these points, my complaint is that he didn't go far enough!

    There is a difference between historical arguments based on interpreting evidence and the numerical arguments advanced by Bulliet: when interpretive arguments fail, they are usually approximately correct, but when the wrong math is used, the true answer can be unrelated!

    Outside of Iran, Bulliet's conversion curves were based on essentially two points: an assumed 3% of the population converted by 64 AH, and the calculated peak of "Muslim names" the moveable parameter establishing when he assumes 84% of the population had converted.

    But as I pointed out elsewhere, at least 3 of the uniquely "Muslim names" were not uniquely Muslim
    ( https://mobile.twitter.com/Tweetistorian/status/1405214849760739331 )

    Furthermore, outside of Iran he is using essentially one primary source: al-Dhahabi's Kitab al-I`bar, and its abbreviation by Ibn al-`Imad.

    If we take out the mistaken use of "Muslim names," his method would imply that, by the time these biographical dictionaries were authored, the population of each region was not only 100% Muslim, but also 100% ulama. That didn't happen by 1348, nor even 1679!

    Imagine trying to do US demography from the ancestors of Christian seminary professors.

    The odd thing is that despite these errors, and 42 years later, the book continues to be cited, as the last systematic attempt to grapple with when the population converted to Islam.

    The problem is the book's math is wrong, so it tells us nothing. We simply don't know when most of the Middle East had converted to Islam (or other factors like immigration, different birth-rates).

    I took a different tack, using geographies rather than biographies.

    I learned that Islamization happened very locally, not at the scale of large regions, but individual villages or neighborhoods.

    There was no large-scale "tipping-point," because 51% doesn't matter outside of a democracy. We probably couldn't distinguish 45% from 55%.

    But in Syria there were still very few rural/village mosques around 1000 CE. In an agrarian society, the bulk of the population is rural. If the bulk of the population of Syria in 1000 CE had no mosques, it seems hard to believe the majority were Muslim, let alone 90%.

    Iraq is less clear, but there I found evidence that the ecclesiastical hierarchy and monastic system was not significantly reduced by 1000 CE, which I would expect to see if 90% of the Christian population had converted to Islam and stopped their donations.

    Egypt was long assumed to have become majority Muslim after the failure of the last Coptic revolt in the 830s, based on a remark by al-Maqrizi (d. 1412). But in 1973 Friedmann pointed out that this misreads al-Maqrizi's Arabic. It refers not to conversion, but victory!

    So we must take seriously the possibility that Muslims were a demographic minority even after 1000 CE, even in areas that remained under Muslim rule. This different context may reshape our understanding of how religion functioned in society (to be continued...)


    that subject is a very neglected area dear zeca ., unfortunately Daniel Dennett  Junior did not become as famous as his son.. The man who explores complex subjects such as  VOoodoooo  or CONCIOUSNESS   or Darwin THE KILLER who made human being nothing more than  evolved  animals..

    I wonder any one of the readers of this forum read this book of Daniel Dennett  Junior??





    well that is that book review by Prof. Norman Anderson

    Do not let silence become your legacy.. Question everything   
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #633 - July 22, 2021, 11:19 PM

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5FDtc9vC2lE
    Quote
    In this roundtable Ahmad Al-Jallad and Mehdy Shaddel host Dr Antonia Bosanquet (Universität Hamburg), Dr Anna Chrysostomides (Queen Mary University of London), Prof. Lev Weitz (Catholic University of America), and Prof. Philip Wood (Aga University, London) to talk about Philip's newly published book, The Imam of the Christians: The World of Dionysius of Tel-Mahre, c. 750-850 (Princeton University Press, 2021).

  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #634 - July 23, 2021, 06:20 PM

    Well this is an interesting publication on Islam and its Calipha political system
    The Caliphate in the Era of Nation-States

    Quote
    The Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS) seems to dominate the news of late for committing atrocities in areas  under its control. A splinter group of Al Qaeda, ISIS has now gained a reputation which can rival other terror groups. Its leader, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, declared that his group has established a caliphate which spans roughly a  third of the territory of both Iraq and Syria.

    But what exactly is a caliphate?

    How does ISIS envision the caliphate it aspires for?

    Caliph comes from the Arabic word khalīfah, which means vicegerent, deputy, or successor. The caliphate  (khilāfah) was formed after the Prophet Muhammad’s death when Abu Bakr was elected as his successor. Abū  Bakr, ʿUmar, ʿUthmān, and ʿAlī are known as the Rāshidūn Caliphas  The practices  of the Rāshidūn era provided precedents for later theories of the caliphate.

    1 The abolition of the caliphate in 1924 precipitated a debate in the Muslim world as they sought to create  institutions by which to organize and govern themselves. Until now the debate continues, with ISIS bringing it to  the fore. ISIS is romanticizing the notion of the caliphate to legitimize its actions by proclaiming its desire to create  a state reminiscent of the time of the four rightly guided caliphs as I have problem with existance of Prophet of Islam "Muhammad"

    2 It raises the question of whether the caliphate as  a system of governance remains relevant in this day and age.

    Should we equate the concept of caliphate with that  of an Islamic state?

     so that publication comes from Virgemarie A. Salazar and published in 2014.,  from National Chengchi University ., Taiwan

    that is  indeed interesting  publications ., Forget ISIS or Taliban or TAILBONES  .. or whatever  But I have more Question and problems with  those four Rāshidūn Caliphs.,

    What I am interested is any publication on these guys who were they? and where did they come from??   

    Do not let silence become your legacy.. Question everything   
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #635 - July 30, 2021, 04:34 PM

    Aaron Hughes - Good Muslim, Bad Muslim: Neo-Orientalism and the Study of Religion

    https://www.academia.edu/50315416/Good_Muslim_Bad_Muslim_Neo_Orientalism_and_the_Study_of_Religion
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #636 - July 31, 2021, 04:26 AM

    Aaron Hughes - Good Muslim, Bad Muslim: Neo-Orientalism and the Study of Religion

    https://www.academia.edu/50315416/Good_Muslim_Bad_Muslim_Neo_Orientalism_and_the_Study_of_Religion

    That review is OK., but that book appears to be lot more interesting dear zeca.. Thanks for that link


    edited by Leslie Dorrough Smith, Steffen Führding, and Adrian Hermann  2020

    Quote
    Contents

    Preface Leslie Dorrough Smith, Steffen Fuhrding, and Adrian Hermann
    Section 1: The Public Rhetoric of Good and Bad Religion

    1. Introduction: "And What Kind of Society Does That Create?" Russell T. McCutcheon, University of Alabama]'

    2. Good Muslim, Bad Muslim: Neo-Orientalism and the Study of Religion Aaron W.Hughes, University of Rochester

    3. Religious Studies and the Jargon of Authenticity Jason A. Josephson-Storm, Williams College

    Section 2: Politics Introduction to the Politics Section Leslie Dorrough Smith, Steffen Fuhrding, and Adrian Hermann

    4. Toward a Critique of Postsecular Rhetoric Naomi R. Goldenberg, University of Ottowa

    5. The Political Utility of the Past: The Case of Greek Fire-Walking Rituals VaiaTouna, University of Alabama

    6. Privatized Publics and Scholarly Silos: Gender, Religion, and their Theoretical Fault Lines K. Merinda Simmons, University of Alabama

    7. What's Religious Freedom Got to Do With It? On the Niqab Affair in Canadian Politics Matt Sheedy, University of Manitoba

    Section 3: Media Introduction to the Media Section Leslie Dorrough Smith, Steffen Fuhrding, Adrian Hermann

    8. The Strange and Familiar Spiritual Journey of Reza Aslan Martha Smith Roberts, Denison University

    9. The Journalist-Ethnographer, Religious Diversity, and the Euphemisation of Social Relations Carmen Becker, Leibniz University Hannover

    10. Scopophilia and the Manufacture of "Good" Religion Leslie Dorrough Smith

    11. Naturalizing the Transnational Capitalist Class: Reza Aslan's Believer and the Ideological Reproduction of an Emerging Social Formation Craig Prentiss, Rockhurst University

    12. Authentic Religion - Or, How To Be A Good Citizen Steffen Fuhrding

    Section 4: University Introduction to the University Section Leslie Dorrough Smith, Steffen Fuhrding, Adrian Hermann

    13. 'Bad Religion' on the University Campus: "Political Correctness" and the Future of the Insider/Outsider Problem in the Study of Religion Adrian Hermann and Stefan Priester, University of Bonn

    14. Studying Religion in a Post-Truth World Stephanie Gripentrog, Christian-Albrechts-Universitat zu Kiel

    15. The Good, The Bad, and the Non-Religion: The Good/Bad Rhetoric in Non-Religion Studies Christopher R. Cotter, University of Edinburgh

    16. The Campus as a 'Safe Space'? A Sociology of Knowledge Perspective on the New Student Protests David Kaldewey, University of Bonn

    Section 5: Classroom Introduction to the Classroom Section Leslie Dorrough Smith, Steffen Fuhrding, Adrian Hermann

    17. What Teaching New Religions Tells Us about the Discourse on 'Good' and 'Bad' Religion David G. Robertson, The Open University

    18. Unintentionally Constructing 'Good' and 'Bad' Religions in Teaching Classical European Social Theories at a Japanese University Mitsutoshi Horii, Chaucer College

    19. Good and Bad, Legitimate and Illegitimate Religion in Education Wanda Alberts, Leibniz University Hannover

    20. Benign Religion as Normal Religion Suzanne Owen, Leeds Trinity University.
    (source: Nielsen Book Data)


    Do not let silence become your legacy.. Question everything   
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #637 - August 18, 2021, 05:08 PM

    Podcast: https://play.acast.com/s/the-rest-is-history-podcast/87.afghanistan-part1
    Quote
    Afghanistan - Part 1

    In the first of a two-part series exploring the history of Afghanistan, Tom Holland and Dominic Sandbrook examine the nation’s complicated relationships with empires and discuss its role in the ‘Great Game’.


  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #638 - August 19, 2021, 06:52 PM

    Podcast: https://play.acast.com/s/the-rest-is-history-podcast/88.thefirstanglo-afghanwar
    Quote
    The First Anglo-Afghan War

    “A war begun for no wise purpose.” This description of the First Anglo-Afghan War, fought in the early-mid 19th Century, could stand as an epitaph for most conflicts in the region since. William Dalrymple has written extensively about the history of Afghanistan and he joins Dominic Sandbrook and Tom Holland to take a deep dive into this ‘graveyard of empires’.

  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #639 - September 07, 2021, 09:37 PM

    Open access book

    "Those Infidel Greeks": The Greek War of Independence through Ottoman Archival Documents
    Quote
    The documents edited by H. Şükrü Ilıcak in Those Infidel Greeks comprise the English translations of select documents from the Ayniyat Registers on the Greek War of Independence preserved in the Ottoman State Archives. The primary importance of these documents is that they are a clear testimony of the larger imperial context in which the Greek War of Independence evolved and proved successful. The mass of information they contain is immense and allows the reader to follow on an almost day-to-day basis how an empire tried to suppress a national uprising—the first of its kind in the early nineteenth century.


    https://brill.com/view/title/60933
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #640 - September 09, 2021, 07:09 PM

    Islamic Archaeology with Dr. Rana Mikati on Bottled Petrichor
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DFNaNeeLH9Y
    Quote
    Join me on this new series as I sit with experts to discuss resources, tools, and other important questions across various sub-fields in Islamic Studies.

    I'm joined today by Dr. Rana Mikati, Assistant Professor at the College of Charleston, to discuss Islamic archaeology. What is Islamic archaeology? What types of questions/research necessitate a good understanding of Islamic archaeology? What is some of the technical terminology researchers need to be familiar with when navigating the field? What are the major journals? What are some essential works students/researchers should be familiar with/have in this field? How do we use material evidence to write properly about the history of a place/period? And more!

  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #641 - September 10, 2021, 07:11 PM

    Podcast: https://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2021/01/islamic-modernism.html
    Quote
    Recovering God's Intent in the Modern Age | Monica Ringer

    What is Islamic modernism, and how did authors of this movement position themselves vis-á-vis other 19th century intellectual movements? In this episode, we examine how Islamic modernism was more than a product of 19th century social and political reforms or even an attempt at using Islamic language to justify such reforms. Rather, Islamic modernism was a substantive theological reform movement, fueled by the belief that God's intent could be recovered through correct and contextual readings of the past. As a result, Islamic modernists helped give rise not only to new understandings of Islam but also to new understandings of history. In our discussion, we draw on Dr. Ringer's book Islamic Modernism and the Re-enchantment of the Sacred in the Age of History out from Edinburgh University Press in 2020. In it, she takes up the work of four authors from across Eurasia: Namık Kemal from the Ottoman Empire, Ataullah Bayezidof from the Russian Empire, Syed Amir Ali from British India, and Jamal al-Din al-Afghani from Iran. Although they shared a religion, it was much more Islam that tied their ideas together.

  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #642 - September 11, 2021, 11:48 AM

    Podcast: https://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2021/06/baer1.html
    Quote
    Conversion and Jewish Histories of the Ottoman Empire | Marc Baer

    In this first part of a two-part interview, we talk to Marc Baer about how he first became interested in Ottoman history and explore the main themes and the questions underpinning the research in his five books. In this conversation, we place special focus on the books Honored by the Glory of Islam: Conversion and Conquest in Ottoman Europe and The Dönme: Jewish Converts, Muslim Revolutionaries, and Secular Turks. Our discussion centers on approaches to the subject of conversion in the Ottoman Empire and the history of the dönme community born out of the transformations of the 17th century.

  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #643 - September 12, 2021, 01:14 PM

    Podcast: https://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2021/08/rudi.html
    Quote
    The Origins of Ottoman History | Rudi Lindner

    Among the most murky periods of the Ottoman dynasty's six-century history is the period of its very emergence in medieval Anatolia. In this episode, we talk to Rudi Lindner about his attempts to understand this early period of Ottoman history and the development of hypotheses and methods concerning the investigation of Ottoman origins over the past century of scholarship. We also reflect on what decades of research and teaching have taught Lindner about sources for history and the questions they require us to ask.

  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #644 - September 28, 2021, 03:34 PM

    Dr. Marina Rustow: Documents and Archives in the Medieval Middle East and Beyond
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0z4wDgZuCVo
    Quote
    In this talk Dr. Marina Rustow (Princeton University: https://history.princeton.edu/people/marina-rustow) discusses the importance of documents and archives, particularly those of the Cairo Geniza, in medieval Middle Eastern history, with an eye to the relationship between medieval documents and digital humanistic methods. Dr. Rustow is among other things  the director of the Princeton Geniza Lab (https://genizalab.princeton.edu), whose innovative work she discusses in this talk, and has worked extensively on the Cairo Geniza and on the recovery and analysis of medieval Islamic archives; her most recent book is The Lost Archive: Traces of a Caliphate in a Cairo Synagogue (Princeton University Press, 2020). In this talk she presents an overview of the Geniza's history of use and discovery and ongoing efforts to preserve and interpret the documentary and archival treasures from the Geniza, including her own work in digitization, HTR development, and crowd-sourced data generation through the Scribes of the Cairo Geniza project using the Zooniverse platform (https://www.scribesofthecairogeniza.org/).

  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #645 - September 28, 2021, 04:19 PM

    Podcast: https://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2021/09/circassian.html
    Quote
    The Circassian Diaspora

    Over the course its final decades, millions of Muslim immigrants, many of them refugees of war and Russian conquest, settled in the Ottoman Empire. Between a quarter and a third of people in Turkey today have ancestors who arrived with those migrations. Yet their history often stops short of capturing the personal experiences of such people, what was erased, and what they have sought to preserve. In this episode, we speak with sociologist Şölen Şanlı Vasquez about how to write a more empathetic history of migration in Turkey through the lens of the Circassian diaspora. For her, this history is not just the story of how people from the North Caucasus were expelled from one empire and settled in an another. It is also a personal story about continuity, rupture, and recovery within the families of immigrants across generations and continents. Through a conversation about her ongoing research project called "The Home Within," we explore the themes of family, gender, ethnicity, race, and erasure --- not only in Turkey --- but across contexts of migration and displacement in the US and elsewhere. And we also reflect on the importance of public history that makes these issues relevant and relatable to a wider audience.

  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #646 - October 11, 2021, 08:59 PM

    Podcast: https://newbooksnetwork.com/maria-mavroudi-byzantium-beyond-the-cliché-open-agenda-2021
    Quote
    Byzantium: Beyond the Cliché is based on an in-depth filmed conversation between Howard Burton and Maria Mavroudi, Professor of History at UC Berkeley. Maria Mavroudi specializes in the study of the Byzantine Empire and this wide-ranging conversation explores her extensive research on the Byzantine Empire and how it has repeatedly been undervalued by historians despite its having been a military and cultural powerhouse for more than a millennium.

  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #647 - October 28, 2021, 10:06 PM

    Podcast: https://play.acast.com/s/the-ancients/mavia-thequeenwhodefendedarabia
    Quote
    To fight against the Roman empire and then make an alliance with them took a certain courage and tenacity. In this episode we are introduced to Mavia, the warrior queen of the semi-nomadic Tanukhids, who did just that. Dr. Emran El-Badawi, associate professor of Middle Eastern Studies at the University of Houston, takes us through the things we know and the things that are speculated about Mavia. Emran also places her within the context of the 4th and 5th centuries CE, and discusses her legacy and connections to Moses.


  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #648 - November 01, 2021, 09:28 PM

    Podcast: https://newbooksnetwork.com/the-last-muslim-conquest
    Quote
    The image of the Ottoman Turks and their interaction with the Christian West, has undergone many changes in the past: from William Gladstone's famous comment that: “[The Turks] one and all, bag and baggage, shall, I hope, clear out from the province they have desolated and profaned.” To the more recent revisionist views of the 'cultural exchange' school, who de-emphasize the military conquest, endemic violence and proto-ethnic cleansing that were in fact part and parcel of Ottoman rule in the Balkans and elsewhere. And, instead emphasize cultural interaction between the Christian West and the Muslim East.

    In his new book The Last Muslim Conquest: The Ottoman Empire and Its Wars in Europe (Princeton UP, 2021), Ottoman specialist, Professor Gabor Agoston, of Georgetown University, goes beyond both of the above schools, in a post-revisionist treatment which while not ignoring some aspects of the 'cultural exchange' school, retains the correct emphasize on Ottoman Turk policies of military conquest, violence and expansionism in the Balkans and elsewhere. In a treatment which depends upon rich stream of research in Ottoman Turkish archives as well as elsewhere, Professor Agoston provides the reader with an in depth analysis of the military structure that made the Ottoman Turks one of the great, military and imperial powers of the 16th and 17th centuries. And why that power's failure to adapt, eventually resulted in its long decline and eventual fall.

  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #649 - November 10, 2021, 10:46 PM

    Michael Bonner on the Sasanians
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y7bo9idrBeU
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #650 - November 15, 2021, 05:41 PM

    Peter Sarris - New Approaches to the ‘Plague of Justinian’

    https://academic.oup.com/past/advance-article/doi/10.1093/pastj/gtab024/6427314
    Quote
    Let us return to the case of Byzantium: it is entirely conceivable, for example, that the emergency legislation and coinage reforms introduced by the East Roman authorities in the period from 541–5 did indeed succeed in stemming some of the worst administrative ramifications of the plague. Indeed, there is considerable numismatic, legal and documentary evidence that the late sixth century witnessed something of a ‘seigneurial reaction’ on the part of the East Roman state, whereby the imperial government and both secular and ecclesiastical landowners were effectively able to claw back some of the gains in living standards achieved in the context of demographic attrition by members of the lower strata of East Roman society. The resilience of the East Roman state (the strongest state anywhere to the west of China at this time) in the face of the plague, should not, however, be misinterpreted as signifying that the challenge posed by the plague was not real. The consequences of the ‘seigneurial reaction’ of the late sixth century, for example, would appear to have included rising social tensions across the lands of the Roman Near East that would serve to undermine the East Roman state’s political and military cohesion in the face of first Persian and then Arab invasions in the early seventh century.

  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #651 - November 26, 2021, 01:52 PM

    Setting the scene for the rise of Islam.

    Podcast: https://byzantiumandfriends.podbean.com/e/59-what-exactly-ended-in-late-antiquity-with-polymnia-athanassiadi/
    Quote
    What exactly ended in Late Antiquity?
    A conversation with Polymnia Athanassiadi (University of Athens) about the way of life that ended in late antiquity. Scholars of Byzantium and the Middle Ages may see this as a period of new beginnings, but Polymnia doesn't want us to forget the practices and urban values that came to an end during it. The conversation touches on issues raised throughout her papers collected in Mutations of Hellenism in Late Antiquity (Variorum Ashgate 2015), as well as the concept of "monodoxy" explored in Vers la pensée unique: La montée de l'intolerance dans l'Antiquité tardive (Les Belles Lettres 2010).


  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #652 - December 02, 2021, 10:45 PM

    New book

    Kristina Richardson - Roma in the Medieval Islamic World

    https://www.bloomsbury.com/uk/roma-in-the-medieval-islamic-world-9780755635795/
    Quote
    In Middle Eastern cities as early as the mid-8th century, the Sons of Sasan begged, trained animals, sold medicinal plants and potions, and told fortunes. They captivated the imagination of Arab writers and playwrights, who immortalized their strange ways in poems, plays, and the Thousand and One Nights. Using a wide range of sources, Richardson investigates the lived experiences of these Sons of Sasan, who changed their name to Ghuraba' (Strangers) by the late 1200s. This name became the Arabic word for the Roma and Roma-affiliated groups also known under the pejorative term 'Gypsies'.

    This book uses mostly Ghuraba'-authored works to understand their tribal organization and professional niches as well as providing a glossary of their language Sin. It also examines the urban homes, neighborhoods, and cemeteries that they constructed. Within these isolated communities they developed and nurtured a deep literary culture and astrological tradition, broadening our appreciation of the cultural contributions of medieval minority communities. Remarkably, the Ghuraba' began blockprinting textual amulets by the 10th century, centuries before printing on paper arrived in central Europe. When Roma tribes migrated from Ottoman territories into Bavaria and Bohemia in the 1410s, they may have carried this printing technology into the Holy Roman Empire.


    Thread: https://twitter.com/incunabula/status/1464530208816611329
    Quote
    Despite the usual hype, few academic books are truly groundbreaking. But @krisrich's new book is the real deal - a paradigm-shattering masterpiece, not least for her superbly argued thesis on the Roma role in early woodblock printing. You *must* read this.

    If further research validates @krisrich's hypothesis, she's done nothing less than discover the 'missing link' of the print revolution - the connecting tissue between Asian printing, woodblock printing in Fatimid & Mamluk Egypt and the first European printing in the 15th century.

  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #653 - December 03, 2021, 12:01 AM

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hgCuAZw7pJg
    Quote
    Mediterranean Seminar co-directors, Brian Catlos and Sharon Kinoshita, interview Kristina Richardson, whose “"Tracing a Gypsy Mixed Language through Medieval and Early Modern Arabic and Persian Literature” ” was the Mediterranean Seminar's Article of the Month for June 2021.

  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #654 - December 03, 2021, 12:42 AM

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yk6PIdIeIaQ
    Quote
    Mediterranean Seminar co-directors, Sharon Kinoshita and Brian Catlos talk with Christian C. Sahner (Oriental Studies: Oxford University), author of  “Zoroastrian Law and the Spread of Islam in Iranian society (Ninth–Tenth Century),” the Seminar's Article of the Month for September 2021.

    Quote
    The Mediterranean Seminar is dedicated to the study of Mediterranean societies and cultures and their role in World History and the History of "the West." Located at the intersection of three continents, the premodern Mediterranean was a shared environment characterized by tremendous ethnic and religious diversity and by the intensity of cultural, economic, and political exchange. Among Africans, Asians, and Europeans, Christians, Muslims, and Jews, and others, both conflict and peaceful communication encouraged acculturation and spurred innovations that transformed the societies of the Mediterranean and their continental neighbors. Though because of the dominance of modern national paradigms, the weight of teleological historical traditions, and assumptions about the rigidity of ecumenical divisions, the premodern Mediterranean is frequently regarded as an anomaly, it was central to the historical developments and cultural transformations that produced Modernity.

  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #655 - December 03, 2021, 02:16 PM

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JcWiWBkPibI
    Quote
    Mediterranean Seminar co-directors, Brian Catlos and Sharon Kinoshita, interview Mayte Green-Mercado, whose book  Visions of deliverance. Moriscos and the Politics of Prophecy in the Early Modern Mediterranean was awarded the first Wadjih F. al-Hamwi Prize for the Best First Book in Mediterranean Studies.

  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #656 - December 04, 2021, 11:08 PM

    Real Talk with María del Mar Rosa-Rodríguez – Aljamiado: A Creative Resistance to Assimilation
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lip02WK9-_E
    Quote
    In the sixteenth century on the Iberian Peninsula in the midst of a burgeoning Imperial Catholic Spain grew a phenomenal body of literature composed by its crypto-Muslim Morisco population. Seeking to preserve and pass on their Islamic identity in the face of extreme duress and persecution, crypto-Muslim Moriscos made use of Aljamiado—a newly innovated medium of writing where the Arabic script is used to transcribe Ibero-Romance vernacular—as a creative means of resistance to the encroaching threat of assimilation by the Spanish authorities.

    Dra. María del Mar Rosa-Rodríguez grew up in the island of Puerto Rico and received her PhD from Emory University in Atlanta, GA. She taught several classes on Aljamiado Literature, Spanish Literature and Muslim Spain at Emory University as a graduate student, then at Purdue University-Calumet in Indiana for 2 years and at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, PA for 5 years before returning to her homeland of Puerto Rico in 2016, where she is an Associate Professor of Hispanic Studies at the University of Puerto Rico in Cayey.

    Her research focuses on the literature and cultural production of Muslims, Jews and Christians in 17th Century-Spain. But her research on hybridity, diversity and religious tolerance has extended to contemporary topics like the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, and topics of social justice and community activism in Puerto Rico after Hurricane María. She is the author of the book “Aljamiado Legends: the literature and life of crypto-Muslims in Imperial Spain (2018)”, and the Spanish translator and editor of Marc H. Ellis´book "Towards a Jewish Theology of Liberation."

    She has published several peer-reviewed academic articles, like “Towards a Convivencia of Religiosities in Sixteenth Century Aljamiado Literature” (2014), (Amina and Mary: Simulated Representations of the Mother of the Chosen One in Aljamiado Literature) (2013), “Simulation and Dissimulation: Religious Hybridity in a Morisco Fatwa.” (2010) among others. She is currently working on her third book project.

    Books and Articles by Dr. María del Mar Rosa-Rodríguez

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Aljamiado-Legends-Crypto-Muslims-Translation-traducciones/dp/1588713067

    https://www.researchgate.net/scientific-contributions/Maria-del-Mar-Rosa-Rodriguez-2003341613

  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #657 - December 21, 2021, 10:39 AM

    Seminar with Rachel Schine and Peter Webb - Skin and Blood? Blackness and Arabness in Middle Eastern Perspectives

    https://mediacentral.princeton.edu/media/Medieval+StudiesARace%2C+Race-thinking+in+the+Middle+Ages%2C+Dec.+14%2C+2021/1_iow3l45i
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #658 - December 25, 2021, 06:41 PM

    Stephennie Mulder - History they don’t teach us: The Archaeology of Islam

    https://www.baytalfann.com/post/history-they-don-t-teach-us-the-archeaology-of-islam-dr-stephennie-mulder
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #659 - December 26, 2021, 03:05 PM

    Stephennie Mulder - History they don’t teach us: The Archaeology of Islam

    https://www.baytalfann.com/post/history-they-don-t-teach-us-the-archeaology-of-islam-dr-stephennie-mulder


    That professor of ART  understands very little about evolution of Islam i to Islamism and evolution of Quran in to word of Allah/God  and  and her twitter + her stories on Islamic Architecture ((SO_CALLED ISLAMIC  which is nothing to do with Islam but it is all to do with Arabic Calligraphy  )) become perfectly valid if she says /writes anywhere that QURAN IS NOT WORD OF ALLAH/GOD   but a book that was put together in 7/8th century interface from collected manuscripts that were already present  in the middle east ...

    she should go and read this book


    Do not let silence become your legacy.. Question everything   
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
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