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 Topic: Random Islamic History Posts

 (Read 108661 times)
  • Previous page 1 ... 19 20 21« Previous thread | Next thread »
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #600 - February 11, 2021, 07:32 PM

    Authority and Control in the Countryside: From Antiquity to Islam in the Mediterranean and Near East (6th-10th Century)

    https://brill.com/view/title/39402

    petra-sijpesteijn published hell of lot of stuff around Islam and middle east...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Da9D1BwJMgY

    her work is very well supported by the Oil funds from middle east...

    https://brill.com/search?f_0=author&q_0=Petra+Sijpesteijn

    Do not let silence become your legacy.. Question everything   
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #601 - February 21, 2021, 10:35 PM

    Christian Sahner - Zoroastrian Law and the Spread of Islam in Iranian Society

    https://www.academia.edu/45146386/_2021_Zoroastrian_Law_and_the_Spread_of_Islam_in_Iranian_Society_BSOAS_
    Quote
    This article explores three important Zoroastrian legal texts from the ʿAbbasid period, consisting of questions and answers to high-ranking priests. The texts contain a wellspring of information about the social history of Zoroastrianism under Islamic rule, especially the formative encounter between Zoroastrians and Muslims. These include matters such as conversion, apostasy, sexual relations with outsiders, inheritance, commerce , and the economic status of priests. The article argues that the elite clergy responsible for writing these texts used law to refashion the Zoroastrian community from the rulers of Iran, as they had been in Late Antiquity, into one of a variety of dhimmī groups living under Islamic rule. It also argues that, far from being brittle or inflexible, the priests responded to the challenges of the day with creativity and pragmatism. On both counts, there are strong parallels between the experiences of Zoroastrians and those of Christians and Jews, who also turned to law as an instrument for rethinking their place in the new Islamic cosmos. Finally, the article makes a methodological point, namely to show the importance of integrating Pahlavi sources into wider histories of Iran and the Middle East during the early Islamic period.


    https://twitter.com/ccsahner/status/1362381891194740740
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #602 - February 22, 2021, 12:54 AM

    New book

    Philip Wood - The Imam of the Christians: The World of Dionysius of Tel-Mahre, C. 750–850

    https://books.google.nl/books?id=9_oPEAAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover#v=onepage&q&f=false
    Quote
    The Imam of the Christians examines how Christian leaders adopted and adapted the political practices and ideas of their Muslim rulers between 750 and 850 in the Abbasid caliphate in the Jazira (modern eastern Turkey and northern Syria). Focusing on the writings of Dionysius of Tel-Mahre, the patriarch of the Jacobite church, Philip Wood describes how this encounter produced an Islamicate Christianity that differed from the Christianities of Byzantium and western Europe in far more than just theology. In doing so, Wood opens a new window on the world of early Islam and Muslims’ interactions with other religious communities.

    Wood shows how Dionysius and other Christian clerics, by forging close ties with Muslim elites, were able to command greater power over their coreligionists, such as the right to issue canons regulating the lives of lay people, gather tithes, and use state troops to arrest opponents. In his writings, Dionysius advertises his ease in the courts of ʿAbd Allah ibn Tahir in Raqqa and the caliph al-Ma’mun in Baghdad, presenting himself as an effective advocate for the interests of his fellow Christians because of his knowledge of Arabic and his ability to redeploy Islamic ideas to his own advantage. Strikingly, Dionysius even claims that, like al-Ma’mun, he is an imam since he leads his people in prayer and rules them by popular consent.

    A wide-ranging examination of Middle Eastern Christian life during a critical period in the development of Islam, The Imam of the Christians is also a case study of the surprising workings of cultural and religious adaptation.

    Quote
    “The debate about how Jews and Christians parted ways is here extended to Christians and Muslims. By introducing us to Dionysius of Tel-Mahre and his dealings with the early Abbasid elite, Philip Wood describes how Christian hierarchs and intellectuals subtly adapted early Islamic norms of language and conduct. This is an intriguing and readable account, nourished by deep erudition, of a Middle Eastern world in which Muslims and Christians were still capable of learning from each other.”—Garth Fowden, University of Cambridge

    “This is an excellent book that will cement Philip Wood’s reputation as one of the leading commentators on the Christian churches of the early caliphate. Using Dionysius of Tel-Mahre as a guiding thread, the book provides a new history of the Jacobite Church and opens up a much wider vista on Muslim-dhimmī relations in the transition from the ancient to the medieval Middle East.”—Phil Booth, University of Oxford

    “In this well-researched and thoughtful book, Wood reveals to us some neglected aspects of the Islamic Empire at its height through the eyes of the little-known figure of Dionysius of Tel-Mahre, head of the Jacobite Christians of Syria and Iraq in the early ninth century, who successfully held his own as a Christian leader in an increasingly Muslim-dominated world.”—Robert G. Hoyland, New York University

    “The relationship between Christian communities and the Muslims and their caliphs in the early Islamic period has inspired a new wave of innovative scholarship in recent years. Wood has been at the forefront of this and in his latest book he develops a fascinating account of the great ninth-century patriarch, Dionysius, and his relationship with the caliph al-Ma’mun. Firmly based in the Arabic and Syriac sources, this book is a major contribution to the study of confessional and cultural interactions between Christians and Muslims in this formative period.”—Hugh N. Kennedy, SOAS University of London


    https://press.princeton.edu/books/hardcover/9780691212791/the-imam-of-the-christians
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #603 - February 22, 2021, 06:25 PM

    Arietta Papaconstantinou - Review of Jack Tannous, The Making of the Medieval Middle East

    https://www.academia.edu/43790029/Review_of_Jack_Tannous_The_Making_of_the_Medieval_Middle_East_Princeton_Princeton_University_Press_2018_for_Bustan_the_Middle_East_Book_Review_11_2020_186_189
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #604 - February 24, 2021, 11:12 AM

    Petra Sijpesteijn - The continuum approach: Multiple legal solutions to run a diverse empire

    https://islamiclaw.blog/author/petra-sijpesteijn/
    Quote
    For a long time the empire that was born out of the great Arab conquests was studied as existing for and consisting of Muslims, and therefore run by Islamic customs and law, even if these were in a state of ongoing evolution. The full realization of the caliphate’s diversity, with many different communities living together and interacting as they sought to resolve disputes, address iniquities and maintain the social order, has resulted in a radical shift in the sources we use and the questions we ask of the legal systems and how they operated.

  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #605 - February 26, 2021, 05:18 PM

    The Hidden Secrets Of Islamic Architecture | (Islam Religious Documentary ) | Timeline

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XdOxBCpk39c

    Quote
    Presenter and art critic, Waldemar Januszczak, sets out on an epic journey of discovery across the Muslim world from Central Asia to the heart of the Middle East and beyond.

    He reveals a world of awe-inspiring architecture, spectacular Islamic treasures and a host of artists and craftsmen, bringing the largely unknown and fascinating story of Islamic art and architecture to the attention of the public. Documentary first broadcast in 2005.


    that is a good one to watch

    Do not let silence become your legacy.. Question everything   
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #606 - February 27, 2021, 04:40 PM

    Ahab Bdaiwi - Late Antique Intellectualism in Medieval Islam: The Shiraz Circle and the Revival of Ancient and Islamic Knowledge

    https://www.academia.edu/44299673/Late_Antique_Intellectualism_in_Medieval_Islam
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #607 - February 27, 2021, 06:17 PM

    Thread: https://twitter.com/KhalilAndani/status/1097204151015141377
    Quote
    Thread: Did philosophy, science & rational thought in Muslim societies REALLY go into “decline” after 12th century? .@neiltyson & @SamHarrisOrg would have you believe so. But history shows us the opposite. Let’s see who first coined the story & test against data...stay tuned

  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #608 - February 27, 2021, 09:19 PM

    Ahab Bdaiwi - Late Antique Intellectualism in Medieval Islam: The Shiraz Circle and the Revival of Ancient and Islamic Knowledge

    https://www.academia.edu/44299673/Late_Antique_Intellectualism_in_Medieval_Islam
    Quote
    The research for the present chapter was funded by the Cook-Crone Fellowship. I am grateful to Gonvilleand Caius College, University of Cambridge, for offering me a one-year fellowship to work on my currentproject on the Quranic Pagans. I would also like to express my profuse thanks to professors Mohammad AliAmir-Moezzi (École des hautes études en sciences sociales), Sean Anthony (The Ohio State University), AverilCameron (University of Oxford), Dimitri Gutas (Yale University), Matthew Melvin-Koushki (University ofSouth Carolina), and Philip Wood (The Agha Khan University) for their invaluable feedback and insightfulcomments on draft versions of the present chapter.


    remarkable  prepublication from that  dr. Ahab Bdaiwi on Persian Shiraz Circle of Shii thinkers

    well here are some snippets   he did some good job copy/pasting good stuff from  some publications  of modern as well as old times..
    Quote
    Quote
    The Shiraz Circle held a deep fascination with occultism and letter magic. This is significant in helping us find more apposite categories that define their worldview. Simply referring to them as Avicennan is insufficient, given Ibn Sina's disdain towards the occult

    Quote
    Beliefs and ideas are indeed contagious,and the history of beliefs and ideas is oftena history of imitation by contagion.But for the contagiousness of a belief oran idea to take effect, there must be apredisposition and susceptibility on the partof those who are to be affected by it.In the case before us, we must always ask ourselves,what was there in Islam that made it suspectable to thatparticular foreign influence?-- (Wolfson 1976, 70)

    Quote
    There was hardly a shortfall of polymaths and versatile scholars and intellectuals in Islamic societies before and after the Shiraz Circle. Some emphasised specific disciplines over others, some were specialists with an impressive command of various disciplines. There were those who looked exclusively
    within the Islamic intellectual terrains, while others beyond and outwards.

     
    Quote
    Islam … builds upon and preserves Christian-Antique Hellenism …A time will come when one will learn to understand late Hellenismby looking back from the Islamic tradition.--- (Becker 1924-1932, 1:201)4  RUBBISH

    Quote
    It will, however, of course, be understood that we only ascribe universal education to one who in his own individual person is thus critical in all or nearly all branches of knowledge, and not to one who has ability in some special subject.--- (Aristotle,On the Parts of AnimalsI.1)



    well I read most of that publication... I will read again as it deals with interesting Persian/Iranian shii Islam of that time ..  but  Names of Persians he mentions in that pub  are so confusing .. many of them have multiple names..

    Do not let silence become your legacy.. Question everything   
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #609 - March 03, 2021, 01:51 PM

    Yorgos Dedes - Blame it on the Turko-Romnioi (Turkish Rums): A Muslim Cretan song on the abolition of the Janissaries

    https://eprints.soas.ac.uk/13304/3/TDAD_48_AyribasimYorgos-1.pdf
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #610 - March 03, 2021, 06:26 PM

    Podcast with Anthony Kaldellis: https://byzantiumandfriends.podbean.com/e/43-is-it-time-to-abandon-the-rubric-byzantium-with-leonora-neville/
    Quote
    A conversation with Leonora Neville (University of Wisconsin) on whether the scholarly rubric "Byzantium" does more harm than good. How did it come into being? What biases and ideologies, especially in the domain of gender, does it encode? What blind-spots and distortions does it create? We discuss whether "Byzantium" enables a Eurocentric western-oriented narrative about Greece, Rome, Europe, and the Renaissance that does not want to recognize classically educated, Greek-speaking, Orthodox Romans in the east.


    Romans not Byzantines.
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #611 - March 05, 2021, 02:47 PM

    Alison Vacca - The Fires of Naxčawan: In Search of Intercultural Transmission in Arabic, Armenian, Greek, and Syriac

    https://www.academia.edu/34860194/The_Fires_of_Naxčawan_In_Search_of_Intercultural_Transmission_in_Arabic_Armenian_Greek_and_Syriac


  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #612 - March 18, 2021, 04:52 PM

    Material and Written Culture of Christian Egypt. Online Lecture Series

    https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLwKWQJMuWtBsWZ-lPxXJujVBfd83yNYJa
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #613 - April 08, 2021, 09:51 AM

    Thread: https://mobile.twitter.com/aaolomi/status/1379855880624160771
    Quote
    The legendary Queen of Sheba is one of the most fascinating figures in Islam. The wife of King Solomon and a queen in her own right, her story is full of mystery and jinn.

    a thread-

  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #614 - April 08, 2021, 12:30 PM

    Thread: https://mobile.twitter.com/aaolomi/status/1379855880624160771
    Quote
    The legendary Queen of Sheba is one of the most fascinating figures in Islam. The wife of King Solomon and a queen in her own right, her story is full of mystery and jinn.

    a thread-


    well not only queen Sheba.. there were few queens in the history of Islam  ..

    BUT WHAT THEY DID AS RULERS AND THE RULES THEY FOLLWED IS NOTHING TO DO WITH ISLAM  AND ISLAMIC LAWS AS I SEE TODAY..

    Do not let silence become your legacy.. Question everything   
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #615 - April 16, 2021, 08:10 PM

    well not only queen Sheba.. there were few queens in the history of Islam  ..


    He has a thread on this: https://mobile.twitter.com/aaolomi/status/1382398811218264066
    Quote
    Islamic history is full of powerful women who defying all odds became queens and rulers, shaping their own destiny and the fortune of their realms

    A thread-


  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #616 - April 17, 2021, 08:40 PM

    Podcast: https://abbasidhistorypodcast.libsyn.com/ep026-26-dr-philip-grant-on-the-zanj-revolt-869-883ce-a-slave-uprising-against-the-caliphate
    Quote
    In and around 869CE, African slaves used to cultivate the salt marshes of Basra in present-day Iraq revolted against their master. Led by an ʿAlī b. Muḥammad, a charismatic messianic figure, their uprising would prove to very damaging to an already beleaguered Abbasid caliphate before being finally crushed in 883CE.

    To explain the cause, details and significance of the Zanj revolt is Dr. Philip Grant, co-author of the "Chains of Finance" published by Oxford University Press.

  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #617 - April 30, 2021, 08:23 PM

    Thread: https://mobile.twitter.com/DrPhilipWood/status/1388137877737988096
    Quote
    I heard an interesting talk from Ursula Bsees on hadith in the papyri. She found masses, very few of which seemed to be in Bukhari and Muslim. It prob. points to a big Khurasani bias in the circles that set the rules about hadith and their authentication.

  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #618 - May 01, 2021, 12:10 PM

    He has a thread on this: https://mobile.twitter.com/aaolomi/status/1382398811218264066

    Quote
    Islamic history is full of powerful women who defying all odds became queens and rulers, shaping their own destiny and the fortune of their realms


    A thread-


    NONSENSE.....   ABSOLUTE NONSENSE

    Every species .. that includes women folks makes  their own destiny one way or other way., As far as women from religious family structure ((whether it is Islamic faith  or other faiths )) is concerned .. ALL WOMEN FROM TEHSE FAITHS AND FAITH HEAD FAMILIES  DEFIED THE ODDS from these stupid faiths and their rules imposed on them and many became independent and to get there they fought for their rights and they have done that  all the way to mid 20th century .,

    As far as some of  them becoming queens and rulers, is concerned.,  they are not too many.,  YOU CAN COUNT THEM ON FINGERS .. that too they were fully supported by their powerful father... THAT IS NOTHING TO DO WITH STUPID FAITHS... 

    dr.  Ali A Olomi is not using  commonsense there., he is using his faith sense  to say that
    Quote
    https://www.abington.psu.edu/person/dr-ali-olomi

    “Women, Education, and Islam.” Women in World Religions: Faith and Culture Across History, Edited by Susan De Gaia. Santa Barbara: ABC Clio, 2018.

    “The Roots of Homophobia and Anti-Gay Sentiment in the Muslim World.” Duke University’s IslamiCommentary, 2016

    “Ibn Abd al-Wahhab and Beginnings of Salafism.” Great Events in Religion, Edited by Florin Curta & Andrew Holt. Santa Barbara: ABC CLIO, 2016.


    https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/head-on-history/id1244299309

    what  dr.  Ali A Olomi   doesn't know is .. ISLAMIC HISTORY AND ITS  HIDDEN ORIGIN SECRETS ... It is also full of hidden family secrets..

    let me watch this

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5CPqwpJmXaA

    Quote
    https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-historical-muhammad/id1244299309?i=1000395475927

    The Historical Muhammad_Head On History

    Who is Muhammad? Did he even exist? In this podcast, we try to uncover the historical Muhammad. We start with the major debates and controversies among historians. Then we move to looking at the difference sources and evidence for the existence of Muhammad and what it tells us about his life. We look at Muslim sources like the Qur'an, Hadith, and Sira as well as non-Muslim sources like documents written by local Christians and other officials. We examine both religious and non-religious sources and follow the traces of history to reconstruct the historical Muhammad. As usual we conclude with book recommendation for further reading.


    Do not let silence become your legacy.. Question everything   
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #619 - May 10, 2021, 04:31 PM

    Thread: https://mobile.twitter.com/PsyPhiDanny/status/1391401953515786243
    Quote
    Have you ever heard: "A muslim scientist discovered gravity"? or maybe "The first psychiatric hospitals were built in Iraq"?

    then you've felt the aftershock of when from 2005-2012 "Jagged 85" edited 80,000 Wikipedia articles to inject Islamic thinkers all over science! (thread)

  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #620 - May 10, 2021, 04:51 PM

    Ellie Bennett - The 'Queens of the Arabs' During the Neo-Assyrian Period

    https://www.academia.edu/47128213/The_Queens_of_the_Arabs_During_the_Neo_Assyrian_Period
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #621 - May 12, 2021, 08:22 AM

    Ellie Bennett - The 'Queens of the Arabs' During the Neo-Assyrian Period

    https://www.academia.edu/47128213/The_Queens_of_the_Arabs_During_the_Neo_Assyrian_Period

    My goodness .. where do you get these links dear zeca ??  wonderful story on Ancient Arab women...
    Quote
    Quote
    The eleventh and tenth centuries BCE, before the Neo-Assyrian Empire, are commonly seen as a period of weakness, as the territories of Assyria were greatly reduced.  In the ninth century, aggressive military campaigns from Assyrian kings were carried out with the aim of retaking territory and consolidating Assyrian power.  The first mention of ‘Arabs’ is in the annals of Shalmeneser III (858-824), where Gindibu  the ‘Arab was mentioned in a list of leaders involved in the battle of Qarqar in 853

    The ‘Queens of the Arabs’ Zabibê and Samsi were mentioned in the royal inscriptions of Assyrian king Tiglath-pileser III, who campaigned in every direction and in almost every regnal year, establishing military control over a wide area.

    The final female ruler from the Arabian Peninsula who has been conspicuously absent thus far is the anonymous ‘Queen of Sheba’. She only appeared in the book of Kings in the Hebrew Bible. As her role was to demonstrate the greatness of King Solomon as a literary device, I have not included her in the main body of this dissertation. Table 1 provides the names of the ‘Queens of the Arabs’ in the Neo-Assyriansources, and the dates connected with them. The nine ‘Queens of the Arabs’appeared over a span of ninety-one years, 

    Quote
    Zabibê                        738
    Samsi                          733-715
    Iatie                             703
    Teelḫunu                     690
    Iapaand Baslu             677/76
    Tabūʾa                         681-676
     Adiye                          650-647


    that is pretty big list of queens in a short period of time with in 100 years    The eleventh and tenth centuries BCE, .......  It is such a ancient times . very interesting story/stories is written in that thesis ., difficult subject to navigate because of its ancient time period ., interesting archeological inscriptions in it is royal inscriptions of Assyrian king Tiglath-pileser III,

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tiglath-Pileser_III

    I was under the impression most of those ancient inscriptions were Art NOT written Language

    Do not let silence become your legacy.. Question everything   
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #622 - May 13, 2021, 03:45 PM

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=di6gBb2Oa9o
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TIw1OPH6QvM
    Did y'all cover anything on the early qibla yet? I am just fascinated by Dan Gibson's work.

    Don't let Hitler have the street.
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #623 - May 13, 2021, 04:55 PM

    Hi three, there's discussion about it somewhere on the qur'anic studies thread.
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