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  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #570 - December 27, 2020, 10:07 AM

    The Making of the Islamic World podcasts: https://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/p/the-making-of-islamic-world.html
    Quote
    "The Making of the Islamic World" is a special series of podcasts intended for use with university students. It offers an overview of the history of Muslim societies from the 7th to 17th centuries. Each episode is based on conversations with three or more scholars whose research and teaching relate to different facets of the history of the Islamic world. Each episode also comes with bonus material such as suggestions of primary and secondary reading as well as further listening.

  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #571 - December 27, 2020, 04:09 PM


    that is interesting ....thanks zeca.,  well again they start Islam after the death/demise of Prophet of Islam... Muhammad(PBUH)...  anyways let me put the direct links on those podcasts..

    Episode_1., What is Islamic law


    Oops .. that is 10 episodes.... Oh well three are enough for me  . well all those 10 episodes are periphery stories of Islam., they have not really explored Islam of Prophet Muhammad  and his life


    Do not let silence become your legacy.. Question everything   
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #572 - December 27, 2020, 04:25 PM

    well all those 10 episodes are periphery stories of Islam., they have not really explored Islam of Prophet Muhammad  and his life


    Isn't that really about an origins myth rather than history though?

    Anyway I thought the episode I've listened to, on the Fatimids, was interesting and put together better than a lot of podcasts.
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #573 - December 27, 2020, 06:43 PM

    Lessons in codicology and palaeography: https://mouse.digitalscholarship.nl
    Quote
    This is a collection of lessons in codicology – the study of handwritten documents or codices - and palaeography from the Muslim world. The lessons will guide you through the ways books were made and used there before the printing press, by investigating the traces left by producers, owners and readers of manuscripts. Using your mouse, you will come close to people in the manuscript age as they produced, transmitted, cherished and “consumed” the written texts.

    The lessons are centered around fully digitalised manuscripts from the oriental collection of Leiden University Libraries. They include samples in Arabic, Persian and Coptic, from cultures ranging from the Maghrib to Mughal India. The lessons can be read in any order. All include suggestions for further reading and questions (with answers) or assignments.

  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #574 - December 28, 2020, 07:16 AM

    Isn't that really about an origins myth rather than history though?

    Anyway I thought the episode I've listened to, on the Fatimids, was interesting and put together better than a lot of podcasts.


    Hi zeca ., I truly read some remarkable  history of Islam from the links of your posts but this podcast link is MOST USELESS OF ALL  because it confuses the novice listeners who are trying to learn about Islamic history .,  those podcasts of that link  are like the book Quran., ..lol..

      in those 10 podcasts,  stories of Islamic empires are misplaced.,  it is like Quran the book.,  where  chapters are misplaced .. timeline of those chapters are misplaced   BUT THE BOOK IS TAUGHT TO THE FOLLOWERS AS WORD OF ALLAH/GOD..

    they put the heading as OTTOMAN HISTORY PODCAST.. then they chit-chat  about .. stories from

    1) Islamic Law.,  2) Imperial Caliphate 3). Rumi's world,  4)  Fragments of Fatimad Caliphate 5). Legalities of al Andalus 6) Crusades in Islamic context 7). Mongols and Muslim societies 8 ) . Mamluk Sultanate 9.)   Islam in west Africa 10) Early Modern Islamic world...

    those  .........Fatimad Caliphate or  Legalities of al Andalus........   much earlier Islamic empires than OTTOMAN HISTORY .......  and and  the  podcast  guys tell nothing about the heading  OTTOMAN HISTORY PODCAST   which actually is 14th century Islamic history

    I tell you this .,  those who love to learn  true history of Islam are better  of reading books/manuscripts rather than  listening to these podcasts dear zeca.,  they actually confuse novice Muslim kids on their faith history .

    anyways thanks for your many many posts and the links in them   and Now I wonder how and what Altara is doing .,  anything you know about him??

    with best wishes
    yeezevee


    Do not let silence become your legacy.. Question everything   
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #575 - December 30, 2020, 06:56 PM

    Forthcoming book:

    Thomas Bauer - A Culture of Ambiguity An Alternative History of Islam

    https://cup.columbia.edu/book/a-culture-of-ambiguity/9780231170659
    Quote
    In the Western imagination, Islamic cultures are dominated by dogmatic religious norms that permit no nuance. Those fighting such stereotypes have countered with a portrait of Islam’s medieval “Golden Age,” marked by rationality, tolerance, and even proto-secularism. How can we understand Islamic history, culture, and thought beyond this dichotomy?

    In this magisterial cultural and intellectual history, Thomas Bauer reconsiders classical and modern Islam by tracing differing attitudes toward ambiguity. Over a span of many centuries, he explores the tension between one strand that aspires to annihilate all uncertainties and establish absolute, uncontestable truths and another, competing tendency that looks for ways to live with ambiguity and accept complexity. Bauer ranges across cultural and linguistic ambiguities, considering premodern Islamic textual and cultural forms from law to Quranic exegesis to literary genres alongside attitudes toward religious minorities and foreigners. He emphasizes the relative absence of conflict between religious and secular discourses in classical Islamic culture, which stands in striking contrast to both present-day fundamentalism and much of European history. Bauer shows how Islam’s encounter with the modern West and its demand for certainty helped bring about both Islamicist and secular liberal ideologies that in their own ways rejected ambiguity—and therefore also their own cultural traditions.

    Awarded the prestigious Leibniz Prize, A Culture of Ambiguity not only reframes a vast range of Islamic history but also offers an interdisciplinary model for investigating the tolerance of ambiguity across cultures and eras.

  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #576 - January 03, 2021, 12:27 AM

    Arietta Papaconstantinou - “No mere scholarly pursuit”: Fergus Millar and the Late Roman East

    https://www.academia.edu/41856313/_No_mere_scholarly_pursuit_Fergus_Millar_and_the_Late_Roman_East_Ancient_West_and_East_19_2020_239_246?email_work_card=view-paper
    Quote
    By downplaying, as it explicitly does, the significance, and even the reality, of any coherent ‘Arab’ identity in the period in question, this book might seem to take one side in the profound religious and communal tensions of the modern world. It does not. Religious affiliations, mythical origins and ethnic identities are human constructs…

  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #577 - January 03, 2021, 05:42 AM



    My goodness  gracious .,  out of the blues you come up with great links on Islamic history of old timers dear zeca.,

    I am just curious here ., did you read any of Fergus Millar's books/publication on Roman history of East??   If anything is freely available on web from his pen please share ...

    Thank you.. and    I hope after this corona  viral pandemic this year CEMB forum will educate 1000s of folks if not millions on the TRUE HISTROY AND TRUTH ABOUT ISLAM & truth about the origins of that wonderful Arabic song sonnet story  book Quran..

    Do not let silence become your legacy.. Question everything   
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #578 - January 03, 2021, 09:43 AM

    Hi yeez, I haven't read anything by Fergus Millar, though I probably should do. If I find anything worthwhile that's freely available I'll post up the links.
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #579 - January 03, 2021, 02:34 PM

    Hi yeez, I haven't read anything by Fergus Millar, though I probably should do. If I find anything worthwhile that's freely available I'll post up the links.

    yes yes   you., i and many who are interested in understanding  seeds of Islam  must read through his works ., In fact   Altara must have read it ., Dr, Fergus Millar(He passed away in 2019)  work is  closely related what Altara is saying for a long time at this site ., I am collecting his work ...

    well let me add a wonderful article from from a web friend's SMOKERS CORNER  from  Pakistan..

    Quote
    In a 2012 lecture at the Institute of Advanced Studies, the late Danish-American historian Patricia Crone described Omer Saeed Sheikh as an “acculturated native” who had rebelled against his adopted cultural mores.

    Sheikh is a British citizen who was arrested in Pakistan for his role in the kidnapping and murder of American journalist Daniel Pearl in 2002. Sheikh was born in London to Pakistani parents who had migrated to England in 1968. They quickly adopted British cultural norms and established a successful clothing business there. Sheikh was enrolled at a prestigious private school in London and was then sent to Lahore’s equally prestigious Aitchison College.

    He returned to England and enrolled at the famous London School of Economics. But he soon dropped out and travelled to a war-torn Bosnia in the early 1990s. This is when Sheikh threw himself completely into becoming a radical Islamist.

    According to Crone, acculturated natives embrace cultural norms of their adopted societies. They do so to advance their status in these societies. These natives may be living in regions where they do not have ancestral roots, or in their ancestral regions that have been colonised by foreign powers. But when, despite integrating the foreign cultural ethos, they feel that their progress is being restricted by the producers of these ethea, they walk out from their acculturated selves, rebel against it and adopt their ancestral culture.

    But what they believe is their ‘authentic/ancestral culture’ is often a romanticised concoction, or even an unintentional caricature. In their rebellion against their former acculturated selves, they may begin to dress in the manner they believe people in their ancestral culture do (or ought to), or they may begin to follow their religion in a more overt manner.

    Quote
    To Crone, the acculturated non-European native’s anger, triggered by his inability to achieve prestige and success despite adopting the ethos of a dominant western culture, is a rebellion against modernity. On the other hand, according to Crone, it is also a failure of Western modernity. The failure in this respect is its inability to hold on to non-Europeans who had willingly adopted modernity but then walked out to rebel against it. Crone says this is because of a fear within the purveyors of modernity that their positions of power might be usurped, by those who had adopted their ideas but were not from its race of origin.

     

    To Crone this is not an irrational fear, but one that an idea needs to let go of if it is to retain converts and grow. In her 2014 book The Nativist Prophets of Early Islamic Iran, Crone writes that one of the main reasons behind the rapid growth of Islam was the fact that its purveyors had made it extremely simple to convert to the new faith.

    The faith’s first century was dominated by Arabs who lived in garrison cities, away from the natives they had conquered. But the natives could enter the garrison cities and enjoy all of its perks and power by adopting Islam. The acculturated native, in this context, did not face any hindrances to progress or rise to a position of power. According to Crone, this is why the native retained his acculturated self and did not walk out or rebel against it, despite his dislike of Arab hegemony. He may have rebelled against the Arabs but not the idea that he had converted to.

    Quote
    Indeed, the huge influx of non-Arab natives into the fold of Islam consequently overthrew the hegemony of its original purveyors (the Arabs) — especially after the Abbasid Revolution in 750 CE. But the faith continued to grow. In Pakistan, however, from the mid-1970s onwards, certain political and constitutional developments have led to the growth of a particular non-inclusive strand of Islam, alienating those who may follow a different strand or may belong to a different faith.

     

    They believe that, even if they acculturate themselves with this dominant strand, they will not be able to achieve the kind of success or position that those who were born into this strand can. They are thus more likely to walk out and leave the idea of nationhood based on this strand vulnerable to contraction. And it has been contracting.

    Quote
    From the 18th century onwards, Islam as an imperial power began to stagnate. Its nemesis was the Muslim community’s slide into myopia. It was eventually overwhelmed by European colonialism, powered by economic, militarist, political and social modernity based on the principles of the ‘Age of Enlightenment’ i.e. rationalism, science, democracy, secularism and capitalism.

    This saw vast sections of colonised Muslims acculturating themselves to this modernity, so that they were not left behind. But because of reasons pointed out by Crone, many walked out of it, giving birth to radical Islamist ideas based on romanticised notions of their faith and its history.

     

    Interestingly, according to the British academic Jonathan Israel, in the anthology The Secular State and Islam in Europe, Muslims who had adopted modernity were actually integrating ideas that were originally inspired by ancient Muslim rationalists. This was also often pointed out by 19th century Muslim modernists such as Sir Syed Ahmad Khan and Muhammad Abduh.

    Israel writes that, as the seeds of the Enlightenment were being sown in Europe, there were European thinkers who were challenging monarchism and the Church by debunking their hostile perceptions of Islam, and informing their audiences that Islam was a rational and inclusive faith.

    According to Israel, not all purveyors of the Enlightenment agreed. But 18th century Enlightenment philosophers such as Pierre Bayle, Henri de Boulainvilliers and Denis Diderot presented Islam as a rational and tolerant faith. Israel writes that these men were inspired by certain ancient Muslim thinkers, and their ideas seeped into the overall construct of Enlightenment philosophies, producing modernity.

    Quote
    Muslim modernists have often reiterated this narrative, pointing out that, by adopting Western modernity, Muslims were simply acculturating themselves with an Islamic past that had been repressed by conservatives. Sir Syed understood this as a battle between aqal (reason and logic) and naqal (tradition and ritual). According to the 20th century Islamic modernist and scholar the late Fazal-ur-Rahman Malik, Islam’s rational past does not fit the world view of ‘fundamentalists’ and radicals who, to challenge modernity, have constructed a largely romanticised past to tout their disposition as being ‘authentic.’


    In other words, those who rejected acculturation (to modernity) by claiming it was alien, were rejecting a repressed Islamic tradition that had inspired this modernity, and falling back on a mythical understanding of the faith’s history to justify their rebellion.


    that is from Nadeem F. Paracha 03 Jan 2021  SMOKERS’ CORNER: THE ISLAMIST MYOPIA

    He couples his article to  the works of  late Danish-American historian Dr.  Patricia Crone., That is a good one from Smoker ....

    Do not let silence become your legacy.. Question everything   
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #580 - January 09, 2021, 12:32 AM

    It's been posted before but it's worth posting again:

    Patricia Crone - The Acculturated Native Who Rebels
    Quote
    In the aftermath of several great imperial expansions, especially those of the Arabs and the Europeans, one sees the phenomenon of the native who has accepted the religion and/or culture of the hegemonic foreigners, only to rediscover his native identity and proceed to take political action against them. In this lecture, Professor Patricia Crone explores what lies behind this reaction and why it was much less characteristic of Islamized natives than it has been of Westernized ones.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QyQt1bCnDm4
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #581 - January 14, 2021, 02:51 PM



    Thread: https://twitter.com/OttomanHistory/status/1349409233750679554
    Quote
    Here is a special thread introducing our series on “The Making of the Islamic World.” It offers 10 episodes about the transformation of Islamicate societies between the 7th and 17th centuries. You can find the series page here: https://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/p/the-making-of-islamic-world.html

  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #582 - January 16, 2021, 10:56 AM

    New issue of Al-'Usur Al-Wusta The Journal of Middle East Medievalists

    https://www.middleeastmedievalists.com/al-usur-al-wusta/current-issue/
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #583 - January 16, 2021, 05:36 PM

    Thread: https://twitter.com/stephenniem/status/1350245861482262528
    Quote
    Guess what just dropped? The latest issue of Al-ʿUṣur al-Wusṭā: The Journal of Middle East Medievalists. 485 PAGES OF SO MUCH GOOD STUFF, and it's all completely free and open-access. Come along and I'll show you what's inside...

  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #584 - January 16, 2021, 10:56 PM

    Vladimir Hamed-Troyansky - Becoming Armenian: Religious Conversions in the Late Imperial South Caucasus

    https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/comparative-studies-in-society-and-history/article/becoming-armenian-religious-conversions-in-the-late-imperial-south-caucasus/E5CC0608B1D8DA518C1E0B45AE3460CB#
    Quote
    In the nineteenth-century South Caucasus, hundreds of local farmers and nomads petitioned Russian authorities to allow them to become Christians. Most of them were Muslims and specifically requested to join the Armenian Apostolic Church. This article explores religious conversions to Armenian Christianity on Russia's mountainous southern border with the Ottoman Empire and Iran. It demonstrates that tsarist reforms, chiefly the peasant reform and the sedentarization of nomads, accelerated labor migration within the region, bringing many Muslims, Yazidis, and Assyrians into an Armenian environment. Local anxieties over Russian colonialism further encouraged conversions. I argue that by converting to Armenian Christianity many rural South Caucasians benefited from a change in their legal status, which came with the right to move residence, access to agricultural land, and other freedoms. Russia's Jewish communities, on the other hand, saw conversion to Armenian Christianity as a legal means to circumvent discrimination and obtain the right to live outside of the Pale of Settlement. By drawing on converts’ petitions and officials’ decisions, this article illustrates that the Russian government emerged as an ultimate arbiter of religious conversions, evaluating the sincerity of petitioners’ faith and how Armenian they had become, while preserving the empire's religious and social hierarchies.

  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #585 - January 23, 2021, 05:28 PM

    Thread: https://twitter.com/ccsahner/status/1352657179736682497
    Quote
    How did conversion to Islam work for Zoroastrians at the ʿAbbasid court?

    In our new sourcebook, Michael Cooperson discusses the life of the powerful vizier and convert al-Faḍl ibn Sahl (d. 818)

    https://www.ucpress.edu/book/9780520296732/conversion-to-islam-in-the-premodern-age

    Al-Jahshiyārī, the great biographer of ʿAbbasid viziers, states that al-Faḍl came from a Zoroastrian family near Kufa in Iraq. His father became a client of the famous Barmakid family of officials (themselves former Buddhists) and converted to Islam with their help

    His son al-Faḍl also entered the service of the Barmakids, who arranged for him to convert at the hands of none other than the ʿAbbasid caliph al-Maʾmūn

    In the case of both father and son, conversion was a means of social and political advancement within the ʿAbbasid elite

    But how much of the old religion did al-Faḍl actually leave behind?

    The biographer Ibn al-Qifṭī states that a doctor friend met al-Faḍl shortly after his conversion; he was freshly circumcised and reading the Quran. The doctor asked him in Persian what he thought of it

    Al-Faḍl replied, "Like Kalīla wa-Dimna," that is, the famous collection of Sanskrit animal fables that was translated into Persian and became a monument of Persian culture at the time

    The comment is slightly blasphemous, but it is also revealing of how Zoroastrian converts seem to have tried to salvage elements of their old culture and self-understanding in the new religion of Islam

  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #586 - February 03, 2021, 07:58 PM

    Simplicity, Creativity, Lucidity as “Method” in the Study of Islamic History: An Interview with Michael Cook

    https://islamiclaw.blog/2021/01/26/14713/
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #587 - February 03, 2021, 10:30 PM

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MYedAjayb-Q&feature=emb_title
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #588 - February 04, 2021, 07:19 PM

    Review of Romanland by Anthony Kaldellis

    https://philologicalcrocodile.wordpress.com/2019/05/23/romanland/
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #589 - February 05, 2021, 03:31 PM


    Interesting name there.. thank you zeca...
    Anthony Kaldellis.,

    dr.Anthony Kaldellis   
    https://osu.academia.edu/AnthonyKaldellis









    all of his four books are worth scanning to learn a bit about   the history of middle east from 1st to 6th century .. the last book you can download pdf file by clicking the pic

    Do not let silence become your legacy.. Question everything   
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #590 - February 05, 2021, 08:00 PM

    Interesting name there.. thank you zeca...
    Anthony Kaldellis.,


    He has a podcast as well: https://byzantiumandfriends.podbean.com/
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #591 - February 07, 2021, 10:52 PM

    Anthony Kaldellis talking about his book Romanland. This is a good introduction to his ideas.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZTbZRqEg2uo
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #592 - February 08, 2021, 11:19 AM

    Thread: https://twitter.com/IslamicOrigins/status/1255921987182039040
    Quote
    The destruction of books during the Arab conquest of Persia: A thread

    There is an infamous story about the Arab Conquests and the destruction of books, which is popularly cited by Islamophobes to show that Muslims are intolerant zealots or philistines who hate science, etc.

  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #593 - February 08, 2021, 01:14 PM

    The Levantini Podcast: https://levantinipod.com/episodes
    Quote
    The Levantini Podcast, formerly the Foreigncy Podcast, is a show about Near Eastern history, language, culture, religion, and more. The podcast is available on all major podcasting platforms and features interviews with academics and experts of the Near East, on both ancient and contemporary topics.

  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #594 - February 09, 2021, 09:30 PM

    Authority and Control in the Countryside: From Antiquity to Islam in the Mediterranean and Near East (6th-10th Century)

    https://brill.com/view/title/39402
    Quote
    Authority and Control in the Countryside looks at the economic, religious, political and cultural instruments that local and regional powers in the late antique to early medieval Mediterranean and Near East used to manage their rural hinterlands. Measures of direct control – land ownership, judicial systems, garrisons and fortifications, religious and administrative appointments, taxes and regulation – and indirect control – monuments and landmarks, cultural styles and artistic models, intellectual and religious influence, and economic and bureaucratic standard-setting – are examined to reconstruct the various means by which authority was asserted over the countryside. Unified by its thematic and spatial focus, this book offers an array of interdisciplinary approaches, allowing for important comparisons across a wide but connected geographical area in the transition from the Sasanian and Roman to the Islamic period.

    Contributors: Arezou Azad and Hugh Kennedy, Sobhi Bouderbala, Michele Campopiano, Alain Delattre, Jessica Ehinger, Simon Ford, James Howard-Johnston, Elif Keser-Kayaalp, Marie Legendre, Javier Martínez Jiménez, Harry Munt, Annliese Nef and Vivien Prigent, Marion Rivoal and Marie-Odile Rousset, Gesa Schenke, Petra Sijpesteijn, Peter Verkinderen, Luke Yarbrough, Khaled Younes.

  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #595 - February 09, 2021, 11:05 PM

    Thread: https://twitter.com/IslamicOrigins/status/1255921987182039040

    Quote
    The destruction of books during the Arab conquest of Persia: A thread

    Quote
    There is an infamous story about the Arab Conquests and the destruction of books, which is popularly cited by Islamophobes to show that Muslims are intolerant zealots or philistines who hate science,

    etc



    Oh my goodness gracious ., you throw important subjects here and there in the  two folders you are very active  dear zeca..

    SUCH SUBJECTS NEED DETAILED INVESTIGATION  .. not just some twitter twits ... so let me move this to this folderIs Iran/Persia going to burn again & go back to 1979? add more information in to it on "The destruction of books during the Arab conquest of Persia"

    Question is did it happen or NOT., if it did what and how actually it happened.,

    And Hi zeca I am just curious of your opinion on these post of yours

    Quote


    So I would love to see your opinion on this wiki stuff

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/People%27s_Mujahedin_of_Iran
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maryam_Rajavi

    WHAT IS YOUR OPINION ON THOSE LINKS

    with best wishes
    yeezevee




    Do not let silence become your legacy.. Question everything   
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #596 - February 10, 2021, 09:45 AM

    And Hi zeca I am just curious of your opinion on these post of yours

    So I would love to see your opinion on this wiki stuff

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/People%27s_Mujahedin_of_Iran
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maryam_Rajavi

    WHAT IS YOUR OPINION ON THOSE LINKS

    with best wishes
    yeezevee



    Yeez - I think the MEK question deserves its own thread. I'll probably start one when I get round to it. Unless you want to start it.
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #597 - February 10, 2021, 12:34 PM

    Yeez - I think the MEK question deserves its own thread. I'll probably start one when I get round to it. Unless you want to start it.

    please do so dear zeca., but the forum has plenty of Iranian and Persian folders.,   This MEK affair .. whatever it is
    Quote
    The People's Mujahedin Organization of Iran, or the Mujahedin-e-Khalq (Persian: سازمان مجاهدين خلق ايران‎, romanized: sâzmân-e mojâhedīn-e khalq-e īrân, abbreviated MEK, PMOI, or MKO), is an Iranian political-militant organization.

    . ideally you can choose and add MEK info on any one of those folders the forum already has and  deals with Modern Iran after Shah regime

    you can start with that wiki link as an introduction and add more info  in it., I would certainly love to know more on the other side of the coin.,  There are two sides to every coin ..

    with best wishes
    yeezevee

    Do not let silence become your legacy.. Question everything   
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #598 - February 10, 2021, 11:26 PM

    I would certainly love to know more on the other side of the coin.,  There are two sides to every coin ..


    I'll start a new thread but for now here's a link for Armin Navabi talking for a few minutes about the MEK.

    https://www.listennotes.com/podcasts/two-for-tea-with/28-armin-navabi-the-battle-l-1GFTK5hzq/?t=3153
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #599 - February 11, 2021, 07:21 PM

    I'll start a new thread but for now here's a link for Armin Navabi talking for a few minutes about the MEK.

    https://www.listennotes.com/podcasts/two-for-tea-with/28-armin-navabi-the-battle-l-1GFTK5hzq/?t=3153

    Armin Navabi is GOOD MAN.. he is too young to understand complexities of middle east .. Just being Ex-Muslim is NOT good enough to understand politics..   Ask Armin Navabi  why he fully supported Mr. Trump...

    Do not let silence become your legacy.. Question everything   
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
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