Skip navigation
Sidebar -

Advanced search options →

Welcome

Welcome to CEMB forum.
Please login or register. Did you miss your activation email?

Donations

Help keep the Forum going!
Click on Kitty to donate:

Kitty is lost

Recent Posts


NayaPakistan...New Pakist...
Today at 03:17 AM

Charlie Hebdo knife attac...
Today at 02:22 AM

The essence of the facts
by akay
Yesterday at 09:54 PM

Qur'anic studies today
Yesterday at 03:03 PM

AMRIKAAA Land of Free .....
Yesterday at 01:14 PM

Random Islamic History Po...
by zeca
September 29, 2020, 08:36 PM

مدهش----- لماذا؟؟؟؟
by akay
September 29, 2020, 10:33 AM

Do humans have needed kno...
September 28, 2020, 01:03 PM

Exmuslim seeking refugee
by zeca
September 26, 2020, 02:39 PM

ملحد في بريطانيا
September 26, 2020, 02:11 AM

What music are you listen...
by zeca
September 25, 2020, 05:12 PM

Freely down loadable Boo...
September 24, 2020, 08:01 AM

Theme Changer

 Topic: Random Islamic History Posts

 (Read 95220 times)
  • Previous page 1 ... 17 18 19« Previous thread | Next thread »
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #540 - August 06, 2020, 09:09 AM

    dr. Walid Saleh  publications

    Do not let silence become your legacy.. Question everything   
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #541 - August 06, 2020, 09:24 AM

    Quote
    that is an important subject ., "The Tafisr's of Quran" I wonder did walid saleh  publish a book on that...  No time right now.. but I have to watch it fully.,


    It’s part of a series of videos (which I haven’t watched yet): https://m.youtube.com/channel/UCryH3BsbX9HovK5qEOyYIwA/videos


    Quote
    dear zeca ..  I am just curious., forget tafsir but  did he publish himself a translation of Quran??


    Not as far as I know.
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #542 - August 06, 2020, 01:08 PM

    It’s part of a series of videos (which I haven’t watched yet): https://m.youtube.com/channel/UCryH3BsbX9HovK5qEOyYIwA/videos


    Not as far as I know.

    Well I just scanned through his publication list,   dr. Walid  really did a good job in many of his publications.,   He Speaks DDL ... anyway interesting publication from him which I am going through now..

    The Preacher of the Meccan Quran: Deuteronomistic History and Confessionalism in Muhammads Early Preaching   by Walid A. Saleh
    Quote
    Abstract    There has been a trend in recent scholarship on the Qur'an to downplay the role of Muḥammad in delivering and preaching the Qur'an, such that one is almost presented with a disembodied Qur'an which has no relationship to his prophetic career. The disappearance of Muḥammad from the Qur'an, and the pretence that there is no preacher, allows for a radical rereading of the text, such that one can then claim not only that it is an outgrowth of a Christian preaching environment, but that the Qur'an's main audience was a Biblically-saturated community. However, there is also a more serious issue at hand. Our Fragestellung about what the Qur'an has to tell us about Muḥammad is problematic. It seeks to reconstruct his life in the manner of a nineteenth-century biography, outlining a linear and comprehensive life-story. The Qur'an is unlike the Gospels, we are repeatedly told: there is no sustained biography of Muḥammad there to be found, and no chronological order to its parts. Indeed, the mantra that the Qur'an does not tell us much about Muḥammad is now a truism in Qur'anic studies. However, the Qur'an is packed with information about Muḥammad: it is actually a record of his preaching.

    In this article I will investigate the most important details    we can find in the Qur'an about Muḥammad, and assess the image of the preacher of the Qur'an as fashioned there. I will then develop the historical implications of my analysis, and show that when we analyse the information in the Qur'an we can obtain historical information about Muḥammad, his community, and their respective ideas. The analysis will be confined to the image of Muḥammad in the Meccan parts of the Qur'an: the topic of his image in the Medinan Qur'an is a matter for another study.


    So it is life in Mecca and life in Medina ....  That 1st paragraph of his publication abstract itself makes me to read it carefully.....  good pub... good pub..

    Do not let silence become your legacy.. Question everything   
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #543 - August 06, 2020, 09:44 PM

    It’s part of a series of videos (which I haven’t watched yet): https://m.youtube.com/channel/UCryH3BsbX9HovK5qEOyYIwA/videos


    Actually it makes sense to watch this video with Pieter Coppens before watching Walid Saleh’s video. Again it’s about the paradigm shift in the tafsir tradition in the 19th and 20th centuries.
    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=7gr7edFHcwc
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #544 - August 06, 2020, 10:27 PM

    Actually it makes sense to watch this video with Pieter Coppens before watching Walid Saleh’s video. Again it’s about the paradigm shift in the tafsir tradition in the 19th and 20th centuries.
    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=7gr7edFHcwc


    well whether it is  paradigm shift in the tafsir  or not., I am terrible in watching videos and thinking about the subject  but I am all for reading  of publications.....published at website/blogs or more importantly in books and journals dear zeca...

    well never heard of Pieter Coppens.... but web is there.. academia.edu is there..

    Pieter Coppens publications/blog/books/whatever

    well I am all for sufi  faiths/sufi stories   whatever that faith may be  but that is very little to do with origins and history of faiths.. Certainly Sufism softens everything with  songs/sonnets/poems and even  heckling 

    Did he do Tafsir on Quran???  if he did not he should do it..

    Do not let silence become your legacy.. Question everything   
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #545 - August 06, 2020, 10:49 PM

    Quote
    well whether it is  paradigm shift in the tafsir  or not.


    As I understand it it’s to do with a change from the Ottoman tradition of tafsir into what would develop into salafism, along with retrieving figures like Ibn Taymiyyah from complete obscurity and getting their works into print.
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #546 - August 06, 2020, 11:18 PM

    As I understand it  it’s to do with a change from the Ottoman tradition of tafsir into what would develop into salafism, along with retrieving figures like Ibn Taymiyyah from complete obscurity and getting their works into print.

    that is true to some extent.,  but  what we do with history of Islam before Salafism before Mongolianism., before ottamanism ... before Osman Gazi ??

    there was plenty of Islam before the year 1299 before the birth of that Osman Gazi of Ghuzz Turks

    well start with year 700 go all the way to 1300

    Quote
    700: Campaigns against the Berbers in North Africa.
    702: Ashath's rebellion in Iraq, battle of Deir ul Jamira.
    705: Death of Abdul Malik. Accession of Walid I as Caliph.
    711: Conquest of Spain, Sind and Transoxiana.
    712: The Muslims advance in Spain, Sind and Transoxiana.
    713: Conquest of Multan.
    715: Death of Walid I. Accession of Sulaiman.
    716: Invasion of Constantinople.
    717: Death of Sulaiman. Accession of Umar b Abdul Aziz.
    720: Death of Umar b Abdul Aziz. Accession of Yazid II.
    724: Death of Yazid II. Accession of Hisham.
    725: The Muslims occupy Nimes in France.
    732: The battle of Tours in France.


    Islam 737 to 833

    Islam 836 to 934

    Islam 935 to 1036

    Islam 1040 to 1147

    Islam 1148 to 1232

    Quote
    1234: Death of the Ayyubid ruler AI Kamil, accession of AI Adil.
    1236: Death of Delhi Sultan Iltutmish. Accession of Rukn ud Din Feroz Shah.
    1237: Accession of Razia Sultana as Delhi Sultan.
    1240: Death of Ar-Rashid; accession of his son Abu Said.
    1241: Death of Razia Sultana, accession of Bahram Shah.
    1242: Death of Bahram Shah, accession of Ala ud Din Masud Shah as Delhi Sultan. Death of the AI Mohad rules Abdul Wahid, accession of Abu Hasan. Death of the Abbasid Caliph Mustansir, accession of Mustasim.
    1243: Death of the AI Mohad ruler Abdul Walid II, accession of
    1244: The Al Mohads defeat the Marinids at the battle of Abu Bayash. The Marinids evacuate Morocco.
    1245: The Muslims reconquer Jerusalem.
    1246: Death of the Delhi Sultan Ala ud Din Masud Shah, accession of Nasir ud Din Mahmud Shah.
    1248: Death of the AI Mohad ruler Abul Hasan, accession of Omar Murtaza. Abu Said attacks Tlemsen, but is ambushed and killed; accession of his son Murtada.
    1250: The Marinids return to Morocco, and occupy a greatar part thereof.
    1258: The Mongols sack Baghdad. Death of the Abbasid Caliph Mustasim. End of the Abbasid rule. Fall of Baghdad, end of the Abbasid caliphate. The Mongol II-Khans under Halaku establish their rule in Iran and Iraq with the capital at Maragah. Berek Khan the Muslim chief of the Golden Horde protests against the treatment meted out to the Abbasid Caliph and withdraw his Contingent from Baghdad.
    1259: Abu Abdullah the Hafsid ruler declares himself as the Caliph and assumes the name of AI Mustamir.
    1260: Battle of Ayn Jalut in Syria. The Mongols are defeated by the Mamluks of Egypt, and the spell of the invincibility of the Mongols is broken. Baybars becomes the Mamluk Sultan.
    1262: Death of Bahauddin Zikriya in Multan who is credited with the introduction of the Suhrawardi Sufi order in the IndoPakistan sub-continent.
    1265: Death of Halaku. Death of Fariduddin Ganj Shakkar the Chishti saint of the Indo-Pakistan sub-continent.
    1266: Death of Berek Khan the first ruler of the Golden Horde to be converted to Islam. The eighth crusade. The crusaders invade Tunisia. Failure of the crusade.
    1267: Malik ul Salih establishes the first Muslim state of Samudra Pasai in Indonesia. Murtada seeks the help of the Christians, and the Spaniards invade Morocco. The Marinids drive away the Spaniards from Morocco. Assassination of Murtada; accession of Abu Dabbas.
    1269: Abu Dabbas is overthrown by the Marinida, End of the Al Mohads. End of the rule of the AI Mohads in Morocco, the Marinids come to power in Morocco under Abu Yaqub.
    1270: Death of Mansa Wali the founder of the Muslim rule in M ali.
    1272: Death of Muhammad I the founder of the state of Granada. Yaghmurason invades Morocco but meets a reverse at the battle
    1273: Death of Jalaluddin Rumi.
    1274: Death of Nasiruddin Tusi. The Marinids wrest Sijilmasa from the Zayenids. Ninth crusade under Edward I of England. The crusade ends in fiasco and Edward returns to England.
    1277: Death of Baybars.
    1280: Battle of Hims.
    1283: Death of Yaghmurasan. Accession of his son Othman.
    1285: Tunisis splits in Tunis and Bougie.
    1286: Death of Ghiasuddin Balban. Death of Abu Yusuf Yaqub. Bughra Khan declares his independence in Bengal under the name of Nasiruddin.
    1290: End of the slave dynasty Jalaluddin Khilji comes into power. Othman embarks on a career of conquest and by 1290 C.E. most of the Central Maghreb is conquered by the Zayanids.
    1291: Saadi.
    1296: Alauddin Ghazan converted to Islam.
    1299: Mongols invade Syria. The Marinids besiege Tlemsen the capital of the Zayanids

    what we do with that Islam dear zeca??

    Mustafa Kemal Atatürk was not a fool.....

    Do not let silence become your legacy.. Question everything   
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #547 - August 07, 2020, 12:51 PM

    The Importance of Ottoman Tafsir: A Codicological Perspective. pdf by  Samuel J. Ross., Asst. Prof., Texas Christian University .. 2019

    Do not let silence become your legacy.. Question everything   
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #548 - August 07, 2020, 03:09 PM

    The Importance of Ottoman Tafsir: A Codicological Perspective. pdf by  Samuel J. Ross., Asst. Prof., Texas Christian University .. 2019


    Thanks for that. As an additional thought I wonder how much Islamic scholarship was written in Ottoman Turkish (i.e. usIng Arabic script) and as a result is now inaccessible to all but a handful of researchers. Presumably it was part of Ataturk’s intention with the language reform to cut off his people from their written traditions. The Soviet Union did something similar with Turkic languages and Persian in the same period. It’s open to speculation how much these and other related policies may have contributed to Saudi and Salafi ideas being able to be plausibly presented as the real Islam.
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #549 - August 07, 2020, 07:04 PM

    Thread: https://mobile.twitter.com/Tweetistorian/status/1290973483896274944
    Quote
    This is @PieterCoppens8 again, tweeting about my research on Jamal al-Din al-Qasimi this week. Let me share a case study on Qasimi today, on which I wrote an article that will be published in MIDEO in 2021.

  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #550 - August 07, 2020, 07:09 PM

    Halil Simsek  - The Missing Link in the History of Quranic Commentary: The Ottoman Period and the Quranic Commentary of Ebussuud/Abū al- Su‛ūd al-‛Imādī (d. 1574 CE) Irshād al-‛aql al-salīm ilā mazāyā al-Kitāb al- Karīm (PhD thesis)

    https://tspace.library.utoronto.ca/bitstream/1807/92054/3/Simsek_Halil_201811_PhD_thesis.pdf
    Quote
    Ottoman legacy of Quranic commentary is highly understudied, if not entirely neglected, in the Muslim and Western scholarship alike. The current study is two-pronged in orientation: in part one, we have striven to explore the current situation in the history and historiography of Quranic commentary and attempted to underline and identify some of the misconceptions and clichés with which the current research is imbued. This first part is complemented, in separate appendix, with a historical study of a verifiable output of Quranic commentaries authored by Ottoman scholars and/or composed during the Ottoman era and under their suzerainty. We have also surveyed Ottoman exegetical attempts and medieval studies undertaken by the Ottomans and associated with the history and historiography of Muslim exegetical studies, all for the purpose of presenting some identifiable features of Ottoman exegetical mindset.

    The second part of this study focuses on a particular Quranic commentary that was authored by an eminent Ottoman scholar and man of state, namely the Irshād al-‛aql al-salīm ilā mazāyā al-Kitāb al-Karīm [Guiding the sound mind to the distinguishing features of the Noble Book] of Ebussuud/Abū al-Su‛ūd al-‛Imādī (d. 1574). Our primary goal is to present a case study of a famous Ottoman exegetical work and pave the way for further studies of other Ottoman exegetical outputs in order to contribute to forming a comprehensive view on the Ottoman trajectory of Quranic commentary. Ebussuud’s commentary led us to determine the exegetical artery of knowledge to which the Ottomans viewed themselves heir. Though the Ottoman efforts in Quranic exegesis can broadly be categorized as reason and linguistic-based efforts, the presence of tradition-based approaches cannot be dismissed as negligible. The study of Irshād thus allows us to analyze a sample of how the tradition and reason-based approaches can be synthesized. Dynastic presence and political orientations are also more glaringly manifested in Ottoman scholarly and exegetical efforts. Irshād is also significant in terms of assessing the history of variant Quranic readings and represents a post-classical exegetical work by virtue of which we are better able to demonstrate how the field was still being contested between the exegetes and the specialists in Quranic readings. Ebussuud’s Quranic commentary furthermore is a study of previous exegetical corpus and it provides exceptional research tools for us to evaluate and assess other exegetical works. Irshād is a work of verification that aimed to determine concise exegetical implications of a given Quranic expression and winnow out innumerous propositions with which the previous exegetical corpus is teemed.

  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #551 - August 07, 2020, 09:54 PM

    New Books Network podcast: https://newbooksnetwork.com/nathan-spannaus-preserving-islamic-tradition-abu-nasr-qursawi-and-the-beginnings-of-modern-reformism-oxford-up-2019/
    Quote
    Nathan Spannaus - Preserving Islamic Tradition: Abu Nasr Qursawi and the Beginnings of Modern Reformism
    What were some of the major transformations taking place for Muslim communities in the Russian Empire of the eighteenth century? How did the introduction of a state-backed structure for Muslim religious institutions alter Islamic religious authority in the empire? And who exactly was Abu Nasr Qursawi and what was his reformist project to grapple with this situation?

    These are some of the questions asked by Nathan Spannaus in his book, Preserving Islamic Tradition: Abu Nasr Qursawi and the Beginnings of Modern Reformism (Oxford University Press, 2019). The book offers a novel intervention in the study of early-modern Islamic thought, whose conventional geographical contours often focus on the Middle East and South Asia. Spannaus shows us that eighteenth-century Russia was also blooming with its own indigenous Islamic scholarly discourses that encompassed theology, jurisprudence, philosophy, and more. These discourses were neither totally disembodied from wider concurrent global trends in Islamic thought, nor completely dependent on them. He examines the work of one Abu Nasr al-Qursawi, an erudite and intrepid scholar who criticized clerical institutions for stagnating the development of Islamic jurisprudence and theology by foreclosing independent juristic reasoning. In doing so, Spannaus meticulously demonstrates how Qursawi radically critiqued the established tradition while simultaneously embarking on his project of interpretive reform, all while maintaining fidelity to the discursive modes and fields of that tradition.

  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #552 - August 08, 2020, 05:29 AM

    zeca is running circles all over the globe around Islam and on the way he is also making me run in circles  Cheesy Cheesy  ..

    zeca made me to scan through  and run around.......  understanding Islam from a Canadian-Palestine guy ..dr. Walid A. Saleh and then to Sufi Islam of Pieter Coppens  after that to Turkey The  Ottoman Tafsir on Quran  and now to  Russia Abu Nasr Qursawi (1776–1812) who tried to reform of Islam in good old Russia ...... lol...

    well that book of Nathan Spannaus  is 75 American dollars..



    no chance buying and reading it..

    well instead of reading the book of Nathan Spannaus  on   Abu Nasr Qursawi  from his Ph. D. thesis of year 2013 ., well Abu Nasr Qursawi  was a sufi guy .. Sufi  Islam is different from Official Islam  which  stems from ruling elites such as Caliphs, and Mullah/Imams

    On Russian Islam in modern times.. it is better to start with  that 100 year old 1923  book of DE LACY " O 'LEARY ., ISLAM AT THE CROSS ROADS

    and come all the way to  modern  Russia  that puts out this picture



    with a heading  Top 100 Influential Russian Muslims’ Ranking Released by Local Media

    Question is WHY ISLAM NEEDS REFORMS??  and why Abu Nasr Qursawi (1776–1812) of Russia  or  before and after him many many folks with in Islam tried and failed to reform Islam??

    that   is an   important question to answer  dear Zeca and I am not sure these Idiotic  combination of Mullahs and ruling elite  could reform Islamic mindset of a society  through Mosques

    this is not done for 1400 years., and this route will not do anything on that in the next 1400 years.,it only leads to disasters.,   THE APPROACH HAS TO BE DIFFERENT

    Do not let silence become your legacy.. Question everything   
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #553 - August 08, 2020, 08:34 AM

    Yeez - that link for Islam at the Crossroads doesn’t work. This one does.

    https://archive.org/details/in.ernet.dli.2015.233606/page/n11/mode/2up


    This article by Nathan Spannaus covers some of the same ground as the podcast.

    Formalism, Puritanicalism, Traditionalism: Approaches to Islamic Legal Reasoning in the 19th-Century Russian Empire

    https://www.academia.edu/8105339/Formalism_Puritanicalism_Traditionalism_Approaches_to_Islamic_Legal_Reasoning_in_the_19th_Century_Russian_Empire
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #554 - August 08, 2020, 11:15 PM

    Petra Sijpesteijn - Did the Early Muslim Empire have a Language Policy?
    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Da9D1BwJMgY
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #555 - August 09, 2020, 01:10 PM

    Petra Sijpesteijn - Did the Early Muslim Empire have a Language Policy?
    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Da9D1BwJMgY

    I wonder is there any PPT ot PDF file of that lecture .. just curious about that slide at time around 34 mts  .. the sale receipt of 65 sheep .. is it in Arabic or Coptic language??

    Do not let silence become your legacy.. Question everything   
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #556 - August 09, 2020, 01:38 PM

    It’s in Arabic and Greek.

    https://www.islamic-awareness.org/history/islam/papyri/perf558
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #557 - August 09, 2020, 02:08 PM


     I guess these are pics

     https://www.islamic-awareness.org/history/islam/papyri/images/dont_copy_please.png

     https://www.islamic-awareness.org/history/islam/papyri/images/dont_copy_please.png

    Quote
    Location

    The Austrian National Museum, Vienna.

    Acknowledgement

    We are grateful to the Austrian National Museum, Vienna, for originally providing us the photo of the papyrus.


    Quote
    [1] A. Grohmann, "Aperçu De Papyrologie Arabe", Études De Papyrologie, 1932, Volume 1, pp. 40-43.

    [2] A. Grohmann, From The World Of Arabic Papyri, 1952, Al-Maaref Press: Cairo (Egypt), pp. 113-115.

    [3] A. Grohmann, I Arabische Chronologie. II Arabische Papyruskunde, 1966, Handbuch Der Orientalistik, E. J. Brill: Leiden/Köln, Plate II:1.

    The images above are reproduced from the stated sources under the provisions of the copyright law. This allows for the reproduction of portions of copyrighted material for non-commercial, educational purposes.

    With the exception for those images which have passed into the public domain, the use of these images for commercial purposes is expressly prohibited without the consent of the copyright holder.


    Thanks..... well they copy/pasted it  from Adolf   Grohmann  ., let me go to original source..

    Do not let silence become your legacy.. Question everything   
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #558 - August 09, 2020, 02:25 PM

    The problem of dating Early Quran Adolf Grohmann-1958

    Hmm worth reading..

    Do not let silence become your legacy.. Question everything   
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #559 - August 10, 2020, 04:02 PM

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=uZncK7NQPqY
    Quote
    Dr Christian Sahner was in conversation with Dr David Taylor about Christian's forthcoming book on the Christian "neomartyrs" of the early Islamic period. They discuss how the medieval Middle East transformed from a majority-Christian world to a majority-Muslim world and the role that violence played in the process. They also discuss how Christian communities composed hagiographic texts to memorialize this violence, and the role these sources played in shaping Christian identity across the early Muslim empire.

  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #560 - August 26, 2020, 10:23 PM

    Bottled Petrichor podcast: https://anchor.fm/bottled-petrichor/episodes/E16-The-Translation-Movement-and-Islamic-Medicine-with-Dr-Elaine-van-Dalen-eil3i2
    Quote
    The Translation Movement and Islamic Medicine with Dr. Elaine van Dalen

    Join me as I discuss the translation of philosophical texts into Arabic with Dr. Elaine van Dalen, Assistant Professor of Classical Islamic Studies in the Department of Middle Eastern, South Asian, and African Studies at Columbia University. When and where were texts first translated after the rise of Islam? What was the "translation movement" and what was the political and social context of the movement? What was the motivation behind translating texts of certain topics and how did the change in social/religious atmospheres engender the translation of other texts? What was the "Bayt al Ḥikmah" and how has this been popularly understood? Who was translating? How was medicine practiced during these times? What was the status of medical knowledge of the human body like during this time? And more!


    Elaine van Dalen on twitter: https://mobile.twitter.com/elainevdalen?lang=en

  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #561 - August 29, 2020, 08:44 AM

    Podcast: https://seforimchatter.buzzsprout.com/1218638/5041169-with-prof-eve-krakowski-discussing-the-cairo-geniza?utm_source=newsletter&utm_campaign=sotcg24aug2020
    Quote
    Prof. Eve Krakowski (Assistant Professor of Near Eastern Studies and the Program in Judaic Studies at Princeton University) discussing the Cairo Geniza. Its History, how it was discovered, its uses today, the Friedberg project, the differences between the literary fragments and documents, her book, and much more.

    "Coming of Age in Medieval Egypt: Female Adolescence, Jewish Law, and Ordinary Culture": https://press.princeton.edu/books/hardcover/9780691174983/coming-of-age-in-medieval-egypt


    Marina Rustow - Lost Archives, Sacrosanct Wastebins and the Jewish Communities of the Medieval Islamicate World
    https://m.youtube.com/watch?feature=emb_title&v=BpRkfXvX6-0
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #562 - August 30, 2020, 08:59 AM

    Jessica Mutter - review of Gideon Avni, The Byzantine-Islamic Transition in Palestine: An Archaeological Approach

    https://www.academia.edu/35278715/The_Byzantine_Islamic_Transition_in_Palestine_An_Archaeological_Approach_By_Gideon_Avni_Oxford_Studies_in_Byzantium_New_York_Oxford_University_Press_2014_Pp_xvi_424_185_cloth_
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #563 - August 30, 2020, 03:59 PM

    Foreigncy podcast: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/foreigncy/e/63247732

    Quote
    Marina Rustow - The Cairo Genizah

    In this episode of the podcast, I spoke with Dr. Marina Rustow who is the director of the Princeton Genizah Lab and the Khedouri A Zilkha Professor of Jewish Civilization in the Near East at Princeton. She is also the director of the program of Near Eastern Studies. We spoke at length about the Cairo Genizah and what its findings can tell us about the everyday lives of people in Medieval Cairo, the world, and more.

  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #564 - September 04, 2020, 10:51 PM

    Podcast: https://www.buzzsprout.com/156019/1735729-the-race-for-paradise-an-islamic-history-of-the-crusades

    Quote
    Paul Cobb - The Race for Paradise - An Islamic History of the Crusades

    In this episode of the podcast, we spoke with Professor Paul M. Cobb about his book The Race for Paradise - An Islamic History of the Crusades. Professor Cobb's book offers a new perspective on the Crusades by telling this period of history through Muslim sources.

  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #565 - September 19, 2020, 09:03 PM

    Nir Shafir - Vernacular Legalism in the Ottoman Empire: Confession, Law, and Popular Politics in the Debate over the “Religion of Abraham (millet-i Ibrāhīm)”

    https://brill.com/view/journals/ils/aop/article-10.1163-15685195-BJA10004/article-10.1163-15685195-BJA10004.xml?language=en
    Quote
    In the seventeenth century, Ottoman jurists repeatedly tried to stop Muslims from stating that they “belonged to the religion of Abraham.” A century earlier, however, the expression had been a core part of the new confessional identity of the empire’s Muslims. This article explores how the phrase changed from an attestation of faith to a sign of heresy through a study of a short pamphlet by Minḳārīzāde Yaḥyā Efendi. Minḳārīzāde argued that the use of the phrase is not permissible and addressed his arguments not to learned scholars, but to the semi-educated. I argue that Minḳārīzāde’s pamphlet provides a glimpse into “vernacular legalism” in action in the Ottoman Empire, that is, how semi-educated audiences received and understood legal debates and subsequently turned law into a space of popular politics.

  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #566 - September 29, 2020, 08:36 PM

    Thread: https://mobile.twitter.com/Tweetistorian/status/1310572722066518018
    Quote
    1/8 Hello everyone, this is @Simon_W_Fuchs from @UniFreiburg. This week, I’ll be tweeting about modern Islam between the Middle East and South Asia. Today, this relationship is often seen in clear-cut, hierarchical terms of “center” and “periphery”. How did we get there?

  • Previous page 1 ... 17 18 19« Previous thread | Next thread »