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Theme Changer

 Topic: Random Islamic History Posts

 (Read 97722 times)
  • Previous page 1 ... 16 17 1819 Next page « Previous thread | Next thread »
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #510 - May 12, 2020, 09:38 PM

    Thread: https://mobile.twitter.com/ccsahner/status/1259803114552655872
    Quote
    1/ Last week, my students and I covered the early history of the Maronite Church (the leading Christian community in #Lebanon).

    The Maronites originated in the plains around Hama in #Syria, but eventually went up into the mountains.

    The question is why?

  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #511 - May 28, 2020, 07:00 PM

    Thread: https://mobile.twitter.com/aaolomi/status/1265696995424993281
    Quote
    From the 8th-13th century, Muslim astrologers synthesized and expanded on Hellenic, Babylonian, Persian, and Indian astrology giving us many of our modern conceptions of the zodiac or dairat al buruj

    A thread on Gemini in astrology from the Islamic world

  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #512 - May 28, 2020, 09:16 PM

    Thread: https://mobile.twitter.com/aaolomi/status/1265696995424993281

    Quote
    From the 8th-13th century, Muslim astrologers synthesized and expanded on Hellenic, Babylonian, Persian, and Indian astrology giving us many of our modern conceptions of the zodiac or dairat al buruj

    A thread on Gemini in astrology from the Islamic world


    I also like these tweets  there

    Quote
    https://mobile.twitter.com/Tweetistorian/status/1265436893422014465

    Five years and three months ago today, ISIS entered the museum in Mosul and began to destroy ancient statues with pickaxes and sledgehammers. They claimed they were destroying "false idols" in the name of Islam. In fact, there is no precedent in Islamic history for their actions.




    Quote
    A few months later in July of 2015, they would begin a campaign of destruction at Syria's most famed ancient site - Palmyra. Before it was over, ancient tomb towers, temples, and the famous Triumphal arch (seen here in 2009) would lie in ruin.


    Do not let silence become your legacy.. Question everything   
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #513 - June 01, 2020, 12:29 AM

    Islam at 250 - Studies in Memory of G.H.A. Juynboll (open access book)

    https://brill.com/view/title/56981
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #514 - June 01, 2020, 02:20 PM

    Stephennie Mulder on Tweeting Historians, thread of threads

    https://mobile.twitter.com/Tweetistorian/status/1267328610731515904
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #515 - June 03, 2020, 08:43 AM

    Thread: https://mobile.twitter.com/bdaiwi_historia/status/1267903104432947201
    Quote
    Short thread on Sunnism. A common mistake made by non-specialists would have us believe that the events following the death of Muḥammad in 632 AD precipitated the Shiʿi-Sunni divide. This is quite wrong. The demarcation of sectarian identities was brought into sharp focus significantly later, around two to three centuries after death of Muḥammad. A fact overlooked by even capable historians is that religious identity markers such as Sunni require diachronic studies sympathetic of the intellectual ambiguity that marked early Islam.

  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #516 - June 12, 2020, 07:44 PM

    Touraj Daryaee - The Empire of Seven Climes (review of Michael Bonner - The Last Empire of Iran)

    https://www.academia.edu/43281391/The_Empire_of_Seven_Climes
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #517 - June 12, 2020, 10:12 PM

    Philip Wood - Early Islamic History and Dionysius of Tel-Mahre
    https://m.youtube.com/watch?feature=emb_title&v=Y7y_A27CpSY&time_continue=490
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #518 - June 19, 2020, 02:59 PM

    The East India Company in Safavid Iran
    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=wFSdoMgRH04
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #519 - June 25, 2020, 08:50 AM

    Thread: https://mobile.twitter.com/aaolomi/status/1275848548840587267
    Quote
    In the writings of medieval Muslim astrologers, Virgo earned a reputation as a sign of the wise. Today known as The Virgin in the zodiac, Virgo had a far more complicated depiction among Muslim astrologers.

    A thread on Virgo in astrology from the Islamic World

  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #520 - June 25, 2020, 08:59 AM

    Christiane Gruber - How the "ban" on images of Muhammad came to be

    https://www.newsweek.com/how-ban-images-muhammad-came-be-300491
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #521 - June 25, 2020, 11:16 AM

    New book (free download)

    Ambassadors, Artists, Theologians: Byzantine Relations with the Near East from the Ninth to the Thirteenth Centuries

    https://books.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/propylaeum/catalog/book/700
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #522 - June 26, 2020, 04:12 PM

    Thread: https://mobile.twitter.com/aslishahqurbani/status/1276267385255854087
    Quote
    I am reading Ahmed El Shamsy’s recent book on the impact of #printing on modern discourses on #Islamic scholarship. Like his previous book, it is extremely readable and insightful. I will post some questions and intriguing passages from the chapters that interest me most.

  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #523 - June 30, 2020, 11:13 PM

    Mushegh Asatryan  - The Good, the Bad, and the Heretic in Early Islamic History

    https://www.academia.edu/42236410/The_Good_the_Bad_and_the_Heretic_in_Early_Islamic_History
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #524 - June 30, 2020, 11:15 PM

    Mushegh Asatryan - Of Wine, Sex, and Other Abominations: The Meanings of Antinomianism in Early Islamic Iraq

    https://www.academia.edu/39509456/Of_Wine_Sex_and_Other_Abominations_The_Meanings_of_Antinomianism_in_Early_Islamic_Iraq
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #525 - July 07, 2020, 12:22 PM

    1001 Distortions: How (Not) to Narrate History of Science, Medicine, and Technology in Non-Western Cultures

    https://www.academia.edu/43531520/Distortions.Proof02._02_september
    Quote from: Sonja Brentjes
    The contributors to the exhibition and publication that we focus on in the second part of this book are British engineers, scientists, and physicians, mostly from a Middle Eastern and South Asian background. They established and run the Foundation of Science, Technology and Civilisation, based in Manchester, and created the touring exhibition 1001 Inventions with its companion book. 1001 Inventions claims that the sciences, medicine, and technologies of our contemporary world are anchored in the activities and achievements of medieval Muslim scholars. This is an effective, ingenious, but fundamentally wrong idea. The story told in 1001 Inventions is replete with 1001 errors, due to the amateurish telling. But it is more than mere lack of professional expertise. For many years, academic historians of science in Islamicate societies tried to correct the most outrageous of these errors. Between December 2014 and May 2015, we even managed to establish a cautious and polite cooperation bringing some of the panels of the exhibition closer to the sources of the past and their academic interpretation, without forgetting their different format as popularized historical information. By now, this cooperation has come to a standstill despite our repeated efforts to revive it. The truth-value of their story obviously is not at the forefront of the amateur narrators. We had the same experience with some of the Museum directors in Great Britain and Norway who showed 1001 Inventions or its offspring Sultans of Science, or journalists who repeat without thinking the new glorious but false narrative.

  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #526 - July 08, 2020, 08:14 PM

    New Books Network podcast: https://newbooksnetwork.com/ahmed-el-shamsy-rediscovering-the-islamic-classics-princeton-up-2020/
    Quote
    Ahmed El-Shamsy’s Rediscovering the Islamic Classics: How Editors and Print Culture Transformed an Intellectual Tradition (Princeton University Press, 2020) is an astonishing scholarly feat that presents a detailed, sophisticated, and thoroughly enjoyable intellectual and social history of the modern publishing industry on what we today consider canonical books of Islamic thought. “Painstakingly researched” would be a description too mild for the depth and breadth of sources and analysis that El-Shamsy mobilizes in this book. Over the course of its 8 delightfully written chapters, readers meet some known and many less known book collectors, editors, Muslim reformers, early Salafis, and European Orientalists whose thought, outlook, normative agendas, and wide-ranging efforts produced a distinct corpus of classical Islamic texts.

    The canonization of what counted as “classical” was itself a markedly modern move and gesture, El-Shamsy argues. Populated with fascinating narratives of manuscript hunting, editorial discoveries and frustrations, and collaborations between Arab scholars and European Orientalists, Rediscovering the Islamic Classics combines the literary flair of a sumptuous novel with the textual density of a philological masterpiece. This carefully crafted and argued book represents both a profound tribute to a mesmerizingly layered archive of tradition and its actors, and a tremendous service to the field of Islamic Studies in particular and Religious Studies more broadly. It will also make a great text to teach in courses on intellectual history, manuscript studies, modern Islam, Muslim reform, and Islamic Law.

  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #527 - July 10, 2020, 12:43 PM

    Thread: https://mobile.twitter.com/Tweetistorian/status/1281290299776528384
    Quote
    MANDATING THE MAHJAR: today, I discuss the Syrian Mahjar in the post-World War I era.

    How did Syrians abroad grapple with the Ottoman Empire's fall? What was their place in the Mandate system that partitioned the Middle East? How did they endure statelessness?

  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #528 - July 21, 2020, 09:52 AM

    The Crusades from the Perspective of Byzantium and the Muslim World

    https://www.doaks.org/resources/publications/books/the-crusades-from-the-perspective-of-byzantium-and
    Quote
    The Crusades from the Perspective of Byzantium and the Muslim World is the result of scholarly reassessments of the Crusades. The views expressed here complement the other examinations that focused on the internal and Western aspects of the movement on the nine-hundredth anniversary of the Council of Clermont. The volume opens with an introduction to the historiography of the Crusades, followed by wide-ranging discussions covering four topics: holy war in Byzantium and Islam; the approaches and attitudes of the various peoples affected by and involved in the Crusades; the movement’s effect on the economies of the eastern Mediterranean; and the influence of the Crusades on the art and architecture of the East. The essays in this volume demonstrate that on the eastern shores of the Mediterranean there were rich, variegated, and important phenomena associated with the Crusades, and that a full understanding of the significance of the movement and its impact on both the East and West must take these phenomena into account.

  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #529 - July 26, 2020, 09:27 AM

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=APhqeMzeBC4&feature=youtu.be
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #530 - July 26, 2020, 01:21 PM



    I wonder that Khalil Andani is an academic in Islamic Studies from this place??



    and I wonder how that Prince Al-Waleed bin Talal bin Abdulaziz Al Saud ... is doing


    Quote
    Al-Waleed has been married four times His first marriage was in 1976, at the age of  His first wife was his cousin, Dalal bint Saud, a daughter of King Saud. They have two children (Prince Khaled  born on 21 April 1978 and Princess Reem, born on 20 June 1982),  and later divorced,[98] in December 1994.

    In 1996, Al-Waleed married Princess Iman Sudairi, but the marriage lasted only approximately a year.[ After divorcing his second wife, Al-Waleed married Kholood Al Anazi,  in 1999. They were divorced in 2004.

    His fourth wife was Ameera al-Taweel; after about six years of marriage, they divorced in 2014. In an interview, he said: "Yes, I announce it through Okaz—Saudi Gazette for the first time. I have officially separated from Princess Ameera Al-Taweel, but she remains a person that I have all respect for


    great guy.. one of the smartest from Saud family clan..  but no direction in life...

    Do not let silence become your legacy.. Question everything   
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #531 - July 30, 2020, 11:52 AM

    Chase Robinson - Islamic Historiography

    https://www.almuslih.org/Library/Robinson%20-Islamic%20Historiography.pdf
    Quote
    How did Muslims of the classical Islamic period understand their past? What value did they attach to history? How did they write history? How did historiography fare relative to other kinds of Arabic literature? These and other questions are answered in Chase F. Robinson's Islamic Historiography, an introduction to the principal genres, issues, and problems of Islamic historical writing in Arabic, that stresses the social and political functions of historical writing in the Islamic world. Beginning with the origins of the tradition in the eighth and ninth centuries and covering its development until the beginning of the sixteenth century, this is an authoritative and yet accessible guide through a complex and forbidding field, which is intended for readers with little or no background in Islamic history or Arabic.

  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #532 - July 30, 2020, 10:44 PM

    Dumbarton Oaks Byzantine Podcast

    https://www.doaks.org/research/byzantine/podcast
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #533 - August 02, 2020, 11:17 PM

    Byzantium and friends podcast: https://byzantiumandfriends.podbean.com/e/29-the-many-identities-of-hagia-sophia-past-and-present-with-bob-ousterhout/
    Quote
    The many identities of Hagia Sophia, past and present, with Bob Ousterhout

    Hagia Sophia is back in the news. To understand what is happening, we need to know the complex history of this building as a church, mosque, and museum, and the many parties that have sought to claim it. In this episode, Bob Ousterhout (University of Pennsylvania) illuminates this rich history, with a focus on the last century and a half, the current political forces, and the priority to preserve the history of the monument for all who wish to study and experience it. He is the author of the magisterial survey Eastern Medieval Architecture: The Building Traditions of Byzantium and Neighboring Lands (Oxford 2019), and an article on the topic at hand: 'From Hagia Sophia to Ayasofya: Architecture and the Persistence of Memory,' İstanbul Araştırmaları Yıllığı 2 (2013) 1-8, which is available here.

  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #534 - August 04, 2020, 08:46 AM

    Pieter Coppens - Breaking with the Traditional Tafsīr Curriculum? Al-Qāsimī’s Tamhīd khaṭīr fī qawāʿid al-tafsīr in the context of late-Ottoman Arabism

    https://www.academia.edu/42384464/Breaking_with_the_Traditional_Tafsīr_Curriculum_Al_Qāsimī_s_Tamhīd_khaṭīr_fī_qawāʿid_al_tafsīr_in_the_context_of_late_Ottoman_Arabism
    Quote
    This article contrasts Jamāl al-Dīn al-Qāsimī’s (d. 1914 CE) treatise on the fundamentals of tafsīr -the introduction to his famous Qur’an commentary Maḥāsin al-ta’wīl- with the mainstream discipline of tafsīr as practiced in his late-Ottoman home town Damascus. I propose that we should interpret his tafsīr as part of the Salafi project to construct an Arabist religious identity as an alternative to Ottoman religious identity. By formulating an approach to tafsīr rooted in the thought of scholars like Ibn Taymiyya and al-Shāṭibī, em- phasizing ḥadīth and akhbār rather than kalām, he broke with the traditional Ottoman madrasa-curriculum in which (glosses on) al-Zamakhsharī and al- Bayḍāwī formed the basis. He thus helped create a new Salafi approach to tafsīr which would become dominant in the 20th century, and -like his call to abandon the traditional schools of law- formed an Arabist religious attack on the Ottoman religiopolitical establishment. The paper consists of two parts: it first explores what the common practice of tafsīr was in Damascus during the lifetime of al-Qāsimī, which tafsīr works were circulating, how the discipline was taught within the mainstream madrasa-curriculum, and which role this played in al-Qāsimī’s own religious education. Second, it offers a preliminary reading of al-Qāsimī’s Tamhīd khaṭīr, the sources he uses, the approach to tafsīr he suggests, and how that relates to the existing Ottoman tradition in his time.

  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #535 - August 04, 2020, 08:55 AM

    Pieter Coppens is this week’s tweeting historian: https://mobile.twitter.com/Tweetistorian/status/1290209536813314055
    Quote
    So, where to start? Perhaps I should shortly explain what my current research is about, and which pivotal studies in my field pulled me into this direction. My current project deals with the Qur'an commentary of Jamal al-Din al-Qasimi (1866-1914). This was only published in the 1950's, but authored early 1900's in Damascus. It is an important witness to a paradigm shift that was taking place at that moment in Islamic scholarship due to the rise of print culture. Through the lens of this Qur'an commentary (Tafsīr) I hope to better understand how the genre of tafsīr left the postclassical manuscript culture of supercommentaries on two to three standard works behind, reorientated itself on a different set of sources, and thus reshaped our understanding of the canon and historiography of the genre profoundly...

  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #536 - August 04, 2020, 12:49 PM

    Seeds from 1,500-year-old Negev trash pits show a world on the brink of collapse

    https://www.timesofisrael.com/seeds-from-1500-year-old-negev-trash-pits-show-a-world-on-the-brink-of-collapse/


    An exaggerated headline there but the article is interesting - on the effects of the Justinianic Plague and climate change on the marginal agricultural environment of the Negev.
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #537 - August 04, 2020, 01:13 PM

    The Greek-Turkish population exchange
    https://m.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=166&v=6d9CihGqNMc&feature=emb_title
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #538 - August 05, 2020, 11:25 PM

    Walid Saleh on tafsir and transregional Islamic networks
    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=BbwVpVFXEAc
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #539 - August 06, 2020, 08:52 AM

    Walid Saleh on tafsir and transregional Islamic networks
    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=BbwVpVFXEAc

    that is an important subject ., "The Tafisr's of Quran" I wonder did walid saleh  publish a book on that...  No time right now.. but I have to watch it fully.,

    dear zeca ..  I am just curious., forget tafsir but  did he publish himself a translation of Quran??

    well before I watch that ( I  HATE   WATCHING & LISTENING) I am more  for  reading what is written and writing....       let me put some links of his publications  to read .....

    QRANIC COMMENTARIES...  Walid aleh

    The Preacher of the Meccan Qur'an: Deuteronomistic History and Confessionalism in Muḥammad's Early preachings....   Walid aleh etal


    his other videos......   Walid Saleh, Associate Professor and Chair of the Institute of Islamic Studies at the University of Toronto, discusses the status of the Qur’an in the 21st century

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tq2ct2vYKyY





     

    Do not let silence become your legacy.. Question everything   
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Previous page 1 ... 16 17 1819 Next page « Previous thread | Next thread »