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Theme Changer

 Topic: Random Islamic History Posts

 (Read 68930 times)
  • Previous page 1 ... 15 16 17« Previous thread | Next thread »
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #480 - September 26, 2019, 09:15 AM

    Maria Mavroudi - Byzantine and Modern Homer: A Thousand Years of Reception
    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=-oAXeH_rl4w
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #481 - October 06, 2019, 09:48 AM

    Thread on women’s participation in warfare: https://mobile.twitter.com/afzaque/status/1180525481424232448
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #482 - October 30, 2019, 04:39 PM

    Michael Cooperson - The Abbasid "Golden Age": An Excavation

    https://www.academia.edu/35276287/The_Abbasid_Golden_Age_An_Excavation
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #483 - October 30, 2019, 05:53 PM

    Michael Cooperson - The Abbasid "Golden Age": An Excavation

    https://www.academia.edu/35276287/The_Abbasid_Golden_Age_An_Excavation

    ...thank you for that pub link zeca..

    Quote
    Jurjī Zaydān., Tārīkh al-tamaddun al-islāmī , 4th ed (Cairo: al-Hilāl, 1935; originally published 1902-06)

    Quote
    After zipping through the political history of the Umayyads, Abbasids, Spanish Umayyads, and Fatimids, Zaydan declares that it would take too long to go through all the other Islamic dynasties that have existed in the world. So he lists them in tabular form, giving their capitals, how many kings each had, the year each was founded, and the year each came to an end. The table takes up four pages. He then continues..

    Quote
    ..........To sum up, from the earliest days of Islam until now, over a hundred Islamic dynasties have come into existence, with some 1200 leaders, among them caliphs, sultans, kings,emirs, atabegs, ikhshīds, khedives, sherifs, beys, deys, and more; by origin Arabs,Persians, Turks, Circassians, Kurds, Indians, Tatars, Mongols, Afghans, and others; and ruled from Medina, Kufa, Damascus, Baghdad, Egypt, Cairawan, Cordova, Istanbul,Sanaa, Oman, Delhi, and elsewhere... But in as much as the Abbasid dynasty is the most famous of them all, and the first to attain civilization (tamaddun), we shall base our description of tamaddun for the most part on the Abbasids..............

     Here Zaydān does not quite say that the early Abbasid period was the golden age. But hisdecision to use it as the exemplar of Arab-Islamic civilization...



    Quote
    Jurji Zaydan  (December 14, 1861 – July 21, 1914) was a prolific Lebanese novelist, journalist, editor and teacher, most noted for his creation of the magazine Al-Hilal, which he used to serialize his 23 historical novels....  In 1910, the newly opened Egyptian University offered Zaydan a professorship in Islamic History, which Zaydan accepted only reluctantly because of his unpopularity amongst conservative Muslims. He was dismissed before beginning in response to significant outcry from the Muslim public, who objected to his Christian origins and secular leanings.
     

    ....
    1901–1906: Tarikh al-Tamaddun al-Islami 5 vols. (History of Islamic Civilization)
    1907: al-'Arab qabl al-Islam (Arabs before Islam)

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #484 - November 07, 2019, 10:15 AM

    Aleksandr Naymark - Sogdiana, its Christians, and Byzantium: a Study of Artistic and Cultural Connections in Late Antiquity and Early Middle Ages

    https://www.academia.edu/27959139/_Sogdiana_its_Christians_and_Byzantium_a_Study_of_Artistic_and_Cultural_Connections_in_Late_Antiquity_and_Early_Middle_Ages._Ph.D._Dissertation_Department_of_Central_Eurasian_Studies_and_Department_of_Art_History_Indiana_University_Bloomington_2001
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #485 - November 13, 2019, 07:53 PM

    Ian David Morris threads on slavery in the Islamic world.

    https://mobile.twitter.com/Tweetistorian/status/1193852876071849987
    Quote
    Hello everyone! Shall we talk a bit about slavery in the medieval Islamic world?

    The contours of Islamic history are deeply shaped by slavery and manumission (the freeing of slaves).


    https://mobile.twitter.com/Tweetistorian/status/1194369147867684864
    Quote
    Following yesterday’s thread, let’s talk about slave soldiery in Islam.

    Enslaved people have been made to fight across many ancient and medieval societies, but they were nowhere so prominent as in the Islamic world.


    https://mobile.twitter.com/Tweetistorian/status/1194700315444023297
    Quote
    Hello again. @iandavidmorris here. Let’s wrap up our discussion on slave soldiers.

  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #486 - November 14, 2019, 02:27 PM

    Arab Apostates in Byzantium: Evidence from Arabic Sources, Byzantina Symmeikta 29 (2019), 273-314  by Abdelaziz Ramadan  King Khalid University-Saudi Arabia

    Quote
    Islamic-Byzantine relations have attracted close attention of many scholars specialized in the history of the two worlds. Several studies have appeared on various political, diplomatic, and other cultural aspects of these relations.However, there are still some aspects that need to be further highlighted,including the status of the minorities of each side on the territory of the other


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0qXNMdmJ__M

    and here is  interview of that dare devil    Rahaf Mohammed al-Qunun from  Canada

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aJIOxnr_YiE

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #487 - November 14, 2019, 05:44 PM

    Thread - Ian David Morris on slavery: https://mobile.twitter.com/Tweetistorian/status/1194981737752862720
    Quote
    Thanks for all your comments and questions! Let’s go through some of them.

  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #488 - November 14, 2019, 09:45 PM

    New issue of the Journal of Middle East Medievalists

    https://www.middleeastmedievalists.com/al-usur-al-wusta/current-issue/
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #489 - November 14, 2019, 11:08 PM

    Thread on early Islamic coins

    https://mobile.twitter.com/ccsahner/status/1194598601873334272
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #490 - November 16, 2019, 06:22 PM

    Coin with shahada in Sanskrit

    https://mobile.twitter.com/ccsahner/status/1195327294505705473
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #491 - November 25, 2019, 11:42 AM

    Thread: https://mobile.twitter.com/ilhanmiharbi/status/1198513096278585349
    Quote
    I often wonder how/when Sufism was made to be synonymous with pacifism. The greatest forces of resistance against colonial imperialism in the Muslim world followers of a Sufi tariqa. Imam Shamil in the Caucasus, Sidi Omar al-Mukhtar in Libya, Sidi Muhammad Abdullah Hassan...


    https://mobile.twitter.com/shahanSean/status/1198781937025867776
    Quote
    Sufism facilitated and provided the ideological basis of the expansion of empire for most premodern/early modern Muslim states: Ottoman, Safavid, Timurid, Mughal, etc.



  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #492 - November 29, 2019, 10:33 PM

    Embedding Conquest Team twitter account: https://mobile.twitter.com/EmCoteam
    Quote
    Scholarship to date has overwhelmingly relied on ‘literary’ sources in Arabic (e.g. chronicles, legal treatises, theological tracts), composed centuries after the conquests and shaped by court politics at their time of writing. This has created a false impression of the embedding of Muslim rule as a top-down process, directed from the centre, built on military coercion and control through administrative systems. Now, however, ‘documentary’ sources in multiple languages on papyrus, leather and paper from all over the empire (e.g. letters, contracts, fiscal accounts, petitions, decrees, work permits) are becoming increasingly available. These sources, whose impact has been limited by linguistic and disciplinary boundaries, offer a direct, contemporary view of how the empire worked on the ground, and how political and social structures were experienced, modified and appropriated by its subjects.

    This project will uniquely incorporate all available documents reflecting Muslim rule from the first 400 years of Islam, to reconstruct the system of social relations that enabled the crucial transition from a conquest society to a political organism that survived the breakdown of central caliphal control, and remains the region’s benchmark model today. It will critically advance our understanding of a world historical event, make a radically new contribution to empire studies, and connect and synergise area studies and disciplinary inquiry.

  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #493 - December 01, 2019, 07:11 PM

    Philip Wood - Christian elite networks in the Jazira, c.730-850

    https://www.academia.edu/41132872/Christian_elite_networks_in_the_Jazira_c.730-850
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #494 - December 04, 2019, 04:52 PM

    “Do Prophets Come with a Sword?” Conquest, Empire, and Historical Narrative in the Early Islamic World   
     a pdf pub by by THOMAS SIZGORICH

    Quote
    Thomas Sizgorich is Assistant Professor of History at the University of New Mexico. His first book, Militant Pieties in Late Antiquity: Monks, Martyrs, and Mujahidun, is under contract with the University of Pennsylvania Press. He is currently working on a second book, tentatively titled Where the Dark Wine Flows: Memory, Desire, and Dominion in Islamic Late Antiquity.


    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #495 - December 04, 2019, 05:04 PM

    BLAKE, SWEDENBORG, AND MUHAMMAD: THE PROPHETIC TRADITION, REVISITED., a pdf pub by dr.  Humberto Garcia. 

    Quote
    Surprisingly—given past and recent rebellions in the Middle East and North Africa—Norman O. Brown's 1982 essay has not received due attention in Blake studies. He argues that William Blake belongs to a prophetic tradition in which Islam is not a foreign non-European religion but a reformist offshoot of Judeo-Christianity.

    Like Muhammad, Blake is a revolutionary prophet who, inspired by his conversations with the angel Gabriel, supplements Christianity with a new revelation about the inherent holiness of sex and the body. In treating Islam as a living tradition that anticipated the Protestant Reformation and includes Blake, Brown denies an essentialist logic that ascribes this religion to Arabs only.

    Quote
    For him, Islam is a universal response to church-state corruption rather than an exotic religion distinct from Judaism and Christianity, and is therefore not reducible to a fixed set of doctrinal beliefs or to any specific geographical locale....

    ..................

     that is the bit of intro of his paper ., good one to read

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bb9ZsDIeruE

    Dr. Garcia    lectures (University of California) answered this question by focusing on the life of the Mughal emissary Mirza Shekh I’tesamuddin (1730-1800), who wrote a Persian travelogue, Shigarf-nama-i Vilayat (“The Wonders of Vilayet/Europe”), based on his visit to Britain in 1766-68.  He is famous for his book on Islam and the English Enlightenment, 1670–1840


    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #496 - December 04, 2019, 05:18 PM

    Thread: https://mobile.twitter.com/ccsahner/status/1202214978109034501
    Quote
    This is an exciting (and potentially controversial) finding because it suggests that the emergence of an Arab, Muslim majority in the the Fayyūm owed not to the arrival of outside nomads, but to cultural and religious "costume changes" within the native Coptic population

    Put simply, most of the "Arabs" of the Fayyūm may have simply been "ex-Copts." Something similar probably happened in other parts of the Middle East where Islamization and Arabization occurred as a kind of one-two punch (e.g., #Spain, North Africa, #Syria, #Iraq, etc.)

    This sheds light on a much bigger historical point: On the eve of #Islam in the 7th c., relatively few people across the Middle East considered themselves to be Arabs (they were #Berbers, #Copts, Himyarites, Aramaeans, #Persians, etc.)

    But in the modern day, many descendants of these same people regard themselves as #Arabs, speak #Arabic, and are #Muslims. Considering that very few ancient peoples were displaced by the #Arab conquests, and that relatively few Arabs settled across the M.E. at this point ...

    We are left to wonder: How did everyone suddenly become an Arab?

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