Skip navigation
Sidebar -

Advanced search options →

Welcome

Welcome to CEMB forum.
Please login or register. Did you miss your activation email?

Donations

Help keep the Forum going!
Click on Kitty to donate:

Kitty is lost

Recent Posts


New here..
Today at 01:43 PM

Conference on Freedom of ...
Today at 01:38 PM

Discussion about "My Orde...
Today at 05:18 AM

Richard Dawkins event can...
Today at 02:23 AM

Greetings ! My story:
Today at 12:53 AM

Idle Thoughts
Today at 12:43 AM

MMA (Mixed Martial Arts)
Today at 12:28 AM

كنت اعتقد انه على ما يرام...
by akay
Yesterday at 07:19 PM

25 killed in blast near L...
Yesterday at 06:49 PM

Pakistan: The Nation.....
Yesterday at 06:31 PM

Everything to debunk day ...
Yesterday at 05:05 PM

24 killed as car bomb exp...
Yesterday at 02:00 PM

Theme Changer

 Topic: Random Islamic History Posts

 (Read 35893 times)
  • Previous page 1 ... 11 12 1314 Next page « Previous thread | Next thread »
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #360 - June 03, 2017, 11:18 PM

    Kevin van Bladel - Gnosticism (in Islam)

    https://www.academia.edu/33292032/Gnosticism_in_Islam_Encyclopaedia_of_Islam_Three_-_2017-4_van_Bladel.pdf
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #361 - June 13, 2017, 09:56 AM

    Maria Mavroudi - Translations from Greek into Latin and Arabic during the Middle Ages: Searching for the Classical Tradition

    https://www.academia.edu/20201425/Translations_from_Greek_into_Latin_and_Arabic_during_the_Middle_Ages_Searching_for_the_Classical_Tradition
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #362 - June 13, 2017, 04:36 PM

    Maria Mavroudi - Translations from Greek into Latin and Arabic during the Middle Ages: Searching for the Classical Tradition

    https://www.academia.edu/20201425/Translations_from_Greek_into_Latin_and_Arabic_during_the_Middle_Ages_Searching_for_the_Classical_Tradition

    Thanks zeca   that is a good paper to read...

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #363 - June 22, 2017, 10:31 PM

    Malise Ruthven - The Islamic Road to the Modern World (review of Christopher de Bellaigue - The Islamic Enlightenment)

    http://www.nybooks.com/articles/2017/06/22/islamic-road-to-modern-world/
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #364 - June 23, 2017, 07:30 PM

    Christian Sahner - "The Monasticism of My Community is Jihad" : A Debate on Asceticism, Sex, and Warfare in Early Islam

    https://www.academia.edu/33599979/_2017_The_Monasticism_of_My_Community_is_Jihad_A_Debate_on_Asceticism_Sex_and_Warfare_in_Early_Islam
    Quote
    This article explores Muslim attitudes towards asceticism in the second/eighth and third/ninth centuries by examining the famous Prophetic hadith: “Every commu­nity has its monasticism, and the monasticism of my community is ǧihād.” The ha­dith serves as a lens for assessing several broader phenomena, including early Muslim views of Christian monasticism, the rejection of celibacy in Islamic culture, and the promotion of a new code of sexual ethics in the post­conquest Middle East—what this article terms the “second sexual revolution of Late Antiquity.” It concludes by presen­ting several accounts of Christian monks who converted to Islam and joined the ǧihād, as well as Muslim soldiers who converted to Christianity and became monks.


    Discussion on twitter:

    https://mobile.twitter.com/shahanSean/status/877883511163826176

    https://mobile.twitter.com/shahanSean/status/877951182307598336
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #365 - June 23, 2017, 07:39 PM

    Sarah Bowen Savant on Ibn Qutaybah

    http://www.libraryofarabicliterature.org/2017/sarah-savant-on-ibn-qutaybahs-probable-raison-detre-his-lack-of-humor-and-directions-for-future-study/
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #366 - June 29, 2017, 07:15 PM

    Joel Blecher - A newly discovered manuscript and Its lesson on Islam

    https://www.theatlantic.com/amp/article/531699/
    Quote
    In the manuscript library at the Suleymaniye Mosque in Istanbul, I recently discovered a manuscript that shows that Islam is always under revision—and that this revision occurred even within a single Islamic book, as its author considered and reconsidered his interpretations over decades of writing.

    The manuscript I’d hunted down was a monumental work from 15th-century Cairo that shaped Sunni Islam as we know it today: Ibn Hajar’s Fath al-Bari, “Unlocking the Divine Wisdom,” which explained in rich detail what Sunnis believed were the most authentic reports about Muhammad’s sayings and practices. This massive commentary explained thousands of these reports, or hadith, and on almost every aspect of the human experience: worship, love, war, business, governance, history, law, medicine, and even dental hygiene.

    To suggest something of an analogy, Ibn Hajar’s Fath al-Bari is for Sunnis what Thomas Aquinas’s commentaries on the Gospels are for Catholics, or what Rashi’s commentary on the Talmud is for Jews: a monumental intellectual feat that helped reshape the way a religious community viewed its own tradition. After each of these medieval works was written, it became impossible to imagine reading the hadith, the Gospels, or the Talmud in quite the same way. That’s the power of commentary.


    Joel Blecher - Revision in the Manuscript Age: new evidence of early versions of Ibn Ḥajar’s Fatḥ al-bārī

    http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/abs/10.1086/690766
    Quote
    What was it like to compose and revise a multi-volume work of Islamic exegesis in the manuscript age? This essay examines a newly-discovered manuscript that contains two early versions of Ibn Ḥajar al-ʿAsqalānī’s (d. aH 852/ad 1449) renowned ḥadīth commentary, Fatḥ al-bārī. The copy was first dictated by Ibn Ḥajar to another scholar almost twenty years prior to the work’s official “completion” (khatm), pronounced in 842/1438, and almost thirty years before the work’s unofficial completion with Ibn Ḥajar’s passing. The manuscript also preserves emendations and elaborations that Ibn Ḥajar added in a later version. An analysis of the multiple layers of revision contained in this document not only advances our understanding of how Ibn Ḥajar refined his exegetical strategies as he composed his magnum opus; it also brings to light the way in which exegesis was influenced by the complex social practice of drafting, revising, and completing a multi-volume work in the competitive and pious Mamluk scholarly environment.

  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #367 - June 30, 2017, 12:18 PM

    Well I am not sure it is random history of Sudan  or  Random history of Islam of a country.,   but it tells the brief story of Sudan .,CEMB had wonderful member from Sudan with  nick of "Greek Goddess".. I hope some where she is working as air hostess .. that was her dream Job.. TRAVEL THE WORLD . She shared quite a bit her personal life .. I wish her the best

    Here is what you didn't know about Sudan, one of Africa's biggest economies in 2000  writes my good friend Nadeem F. Paracha  with these pictures


    Sudanese capital, Khartoum. Despite severe economic sanctions, Sudan’s economy boomed in the early 2000s, becoming the biggest in Africa


    1956: The first Sudanese parliament declares independence.


    Leader of the 1958 military coup in Sudan, General Abboud. He was a sympathiser of the quasi-Islamic groups, the Ansar and the Khatimiyya. — Photo: Past Daily.


    A US military advisor is seen here next to Nimeiry being briefed by aids right after the 1976 failed coup attempt. — Photo: TIME.


    Sudanese Islamic ideologue, Hasan Turabi. — Photo: The Guardian.


    From 1979 onward, Nimeiry began to appear in traditional Sudanese dress. — Photo: iGuim.


    State-sponsored rallies against alcohol were introduced by Nimeiry in the early 1980s. So were public hangings, amputations and flogging. — Photo: The Asian.


    Bashir with Tirabi.


    A severe drought and famine mainly due to civil war and the state’s policies killed thousands of Sudanese in 1985.

    Top picture and bottom picture tells all the story of Islamized Sudan..  And this this is brief  timeline of   Sudanese History

    Quote
    1). Sudan Ancient History:  Sudan was home to numerous ancient civilisations, such as the Kingdom of Kush, Kerma, Nobatia, Alodia, Makuria, Meroë and others, most of which flourished along the Nile.

     2). Kingdom of Kush (1070 BC – AD 350)
     During the pre-dynastic period Nubia and Nagadan Upper Egypt were identical, simultaneously evolved systems of pharaonic kingship by 3300 BC.

    3). Christianity to Islam :   By virtue of its proximity to Egypt, the Sudan participated in the wider history of the Near East inasmuch as it was Christianized by the 6th century, and Islamized in the 15th.

    4).  Sudan (1821–85):   Sudan under Muhammad Ali and his successors traces the period from Muhammad Ali Pasha's invasion of Sudan in 1820 until the fall of Khartoum in 1885 to Muhammad Ahmad, the self-proclaimed Mahdi. This era of Ottoman control is commonly known as the Turkiyah. Islamization  of Sudan started and completed with in short time.

    5).  Anglo-Egyptian Sudan (1899–1956) : In 1899, Britain and Egypt reached an agreement under which Sudan was run by a governor-general appointed by Egypt with British consent. In reality Sudan was effectively administered as a Crown colony. The British were keen to reverse the process, started under Muhammad Ali Pasha, of uniting the Nile Valley under Egyptian leadership, and sought to frustrate all efforts aimed at further uniting the two countries.

     6). Sudan Independence from England (1956–69):   polling process was carried out resulting in composition of a democratic parliament and Ismail al-Azhari was elected first Prime Minister and led the first modern Sudanese government.[30] On 1 January 1956, in a special ceremony held at the People's Palace, the Egyptian and British flags were lowered and the new Sudanese flag, composed of green, blue and yellow stripes, was raised in their place by the prime minister Ismail al-Azhari.

    7). Coups ad Recoups with ...Communism, Islam., Military West ..etc..etc.. Dissatisfaction culminated in a second coup d'état on 25 May 1969. The coup leader, Col. Gaafar Nimeiry, became prime minister, and the new regime abolished parliament and outlawed all political parties. Disputes between Marxist and non-Marxist elements within the ruling military coalition resulted in a briefly successful coup in July 1971, led by the Sudanese Communist Party.

    Several days later, anti-communist military elements restored Nimeiry to power. In 1972, the Addis Ababa Agreement led to a cessation of the north-south civil war and a degree of self-rule. This led to ten years hiatus in the civil war but less happily an end to American investment in the Jonglei Canal project.

    Colonel Omar al-Bashir 1989-to still going:  On 30 June 1989, Colonel Omar al-Bashir led a bloodless military coup  The new military government suspended political parties and introduced an Islamic legal code on the national level.  Later al-Bashir carried out purges and executions in the upper ranks of the army, the banning of associations, political parties, and independent newspapers, and the imprisonment of leading political figures and journalists.  On 16 October 1993, al-Bashir appointed himself "President" and disbanded the Revolutionary Command Council. The executive and legislative powers of the council were taken by al-Bashir

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Omar_al-Bashir


    well this is the news from that hero from yesterday  Sudan’s Al-Bashir meets sacked minister in Saudi Arabia



    I am not sure what the fuck is cooking between Sand land and that Nubian Country where ancient white and Blue nile rivers meet but the Rich country Sudan went  down the drain wit in 150 years ..  

    Well I am just parking it as history of Sudan in brief   but to learn more read the first link .

    Quote

    ha! those three pictures tells everything on Sharia Laws  and Islamic Politics with a  pinch of  communism to grab the power

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #368 - July 04, 2017, 04:52 PM

    Gideon Avni - “From Polis to Madina” Revisited – Urban Change in Byzantine and early Islamic Palestine

    http://www.antiquities.org.il/data/Avni_From_Polis_to_Madina.pdf
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #369 - July 04, 2017, 07:30 PM

    An interesting article in French arguing that the most widely spoken language among the Muslim forces that conquered Spain was a North African form of Latin that went on to influence the later development of Spanish. According to this argument Arabic would initially have been more the language of a ruling minority of the invaders, with Latin still the main common language spoken along the North African coast. This is obscured by the tendency of modern historians to describe the non-Arab forces involved as 'Berbers' without really considering which language or languages they are likely to have spoken.

    Roger Wright - Le latin tardif de l'Espagne musulmane : une influence du latin d'Afrique

    https://www.academia.edu/33701234/Le_latin_tardif_de_lEspagne_musulmane_une_influence_du_latin_dAfrique
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #370 - July 05, 2017, 09:34 AM

    Ahmad Al-Jallad - Graeco-Arabica I: the southern Levant

    https://www.academia.edu/7583140/Al-Jallad._2017._Graeco-Arabica_I_the_southern_Levant
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #371 - July 05, 2017, 09:53 AM

    Caitlin Green - Sasanian finds in early medieval Britain and beyond: another global distribution from Late Antiquity?

    http://www.caitlingreen.org/2017/07/sasanian-finds-in-early-medieval-britain.html
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #372 - July 07, 2017, 12:38 AM

    An interesting article in French arguing that the most widely spoken language among the Muslim forces that conquered Spain was a North African form of Latin that went on to influence the later development of Spanish. According to this argument Arabic would initially have been more the language of a ruling minority of the invaders, with Latin still the main common language spoken along the North African coast. This is obscured by the tendency of modern historians to describe the non-Arab forces involved as 'Berbers' without really considering which language or languages they are likely to have spoken.


    Self-quote on a North African Romance find:
    More: "betrays a lack of awareness of the [Latin] case system and is peppered with vulgarisms". So this letter too is in vulgar-Latin / proto-Romance. "como and comodo for quomodo; iscribimus for scribimus". This sucker is almost SPANISH!

  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #373 - July 07, 2017, 10:14 AM

    More on African Latin/Romance: http://lughat.blogspot.co.uk/2007/07/berberised-afro-latin-speakers-in-gafsa.html

    Edit: from the same blog...

    Lameen Souag - Latin-speaking Muslims in medieval Africa

    http://lughat.blogspot.co.uk/2017/05/latin-speaking-muslims-in-medieval.html
    Quote
    In the Middle Ages as today, Christians and Jews regularly called God "Allah" when speaking Arabic, just as Muslims did . It is perhaps not as well known that the converse was often also true: from a very early period, North African Muslims called God "Deus" when speaking Latin. This can clearly be seen on the 8th century Umayyad coins of Tunisia and Spain, which include statements such as:

    Non deus nisi Deus solus - There is no god but God alone (لا إله إلا الله)

    Deus magnus omnium creator - God is great, the creator of all things (الله أكبر خالق كل شيء)

    I had always assumed it more or less stopped there, as Latin-speaking Muslims shifted to Arabic. But in the towns of southern Tunisia, the former Bilad ul-Jarid, Latin was still being spoken well into the 12th century. In his recent book La langue berbère au Maghreb médiéval (p. 313), Mohamed Meouak uncovers a short recorded example of spoken African Latin from between these two periods, which otherwise seems to have escaped notice so far.

    The 11th-century Ibadi history of Abu Zakariyya al-Warjlani, he gives a brief biography of the Rustamid governor Abu Ubayda Abd al-Hamid al-Jannawni (d. 826), who lived in the Nafusa Mountains of northwestern Libya. Before assuming his position, this future governor swore an oath:

    Bi-llaahi (by God) in Arabic, and bar diyuu in town-language (بالحضرية), and abiikyush in Berber, I shall entrust the Muslims' affairs only to a person who says: "I am only a weak being, I am only a weak being."

    In al-Shammakhi's later retelling, the languages are named as Arabic, Ajami, and Berber (بلغة العرب وبلغة العجم وبلغة البربر). As Mohamed Meouak correctly though hesitantly notes, diyuu must be Deo; he leaves bar uninterpreted, but it is equally clearly Latin per, making the expression an exact translation of Arabic bi-llaahi. The Berber form is probably somewhat miscopied, but seems to include the medieval Berber word for God, Yuc / Yakuc.

    The earliest Romance text is the Old French part of the Oaths of Strasbourg, made in 842 and opening Pro Deo amur... "for the love of God". The Ibadi phrase recorded above curiously echoes this, although it predates it by several decades.


    From the comments...
    Quote
    Considering how dissimilar various Romance languages are from one another today, phonologically, I suspect that, if a Romance language had emerged and survived to the present day in North Africa, it would be quite distinctive today, phonologically. We do know that North African Latin had preserved final /s/, so that if we could jump aboard a Wellsian time machine and go back a thousand years (or so...) and hear what this Spoken Tunisian Latin was like, I suspect it would sound more like Spanish or Sardinian than Italian.

  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #374 - July 07, 2017, 04:28 PM

    Robert Hoyland - Muslim Accounts of the Ancient Persians
    https://m.youtube.com/watch?feature=youtu.be&v=9xeNq49A3Sw
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #375 - July 07, 2017, 05:39 PM

    Robert Hoyland - Muslim Accounts of the Ancient Persians
    https://m.youtube.com/watch?feature=youtu.be&v=9xeNq49A3Sw

    hmm.,  that is a good one zeca  .,   let me add a pdf file of his book here



    that picture has  pdf file of that book embedded in it ... click and download  to read

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #376 - July 09, 2017, 09:23 AM

    Emilio González Ferrín - Eulogius of Cordoba and the Arabization of Public Life in Al-Andalus

    https://www.academia.edu/33816541/FERRIN_-_Eulogius_of_Cordoba_and_the_Arabization_of_Public_Life_in_Al-Andalus.pdf
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #377 - July 09, 2017, 09:02 PM

    Articles by a Maltese historian on Muslim Malta under Christian rule and the short lived Norman kingdom of Africa.

    Charles Dalli - A Muslim society under Christian rule

    https://www.academia.edu/243365/A_Muslim_Society_Under_Christian_Rule

    Charles Dalli - Bridging Europe and Africa: Norman Sicily's other kingdom

    https://www.academia.edu/243360/Bridging_Europe_and_Africa_Norman_Sicilys_Other_Kingdom

    From an article in Malta Today http://www.maltatoday.com.mt/news/national/62248/maltese_feast_names_give_clues_to_islands_muslim_history#.WWKd8bHTWhA
    Quote
    It is not easy to imagine Malta – so fiercely proud of its Roman Catholic roots – as the Islamic society it once was, and scant records exist of the centuries in which the island was under Arab rule. 

    Yet, as medieval historian Charles Dalli explains, remnants of a Muslim Malta still remain – perhaps ironically in the Maltese names for Catholic feasts.   

    For example, the Maltese word Randan (Lent) comes from Ramadan – the holy month of fasting and sacrifice in Islam. Similarly, Għid (Easter) has its roots in Eid al-Fitr, the joyous Islamic feast that marks the end of Ramadan, and Milied (Christmas) originates from Mawlid, the Islamic celebration of the birth of the Prophet Muhammad.

    Also, the Maltese word for ‘Friday’ (Il-Ġimgħa) is called so because it was the day in which Muslims on the island used to attend their weekly congregational ‘Jumu’ah’ prayers. 

    “The indication is that the local scene was very heavily Arabicised and Islamicised by the time the Normans conquered the island,” Charles Dalli told MaltaToday. “Although the Normans certainly urged the public to convert to Christianity, they didn’t Latinise them and allowed them to continue speaking Arabic. This is probably why the Maltese words for Christian feasts are derived from similar Islamic celebrations.” 
    ....

    It's an accident of history, I suppose, that Tunisia didn't end up the same way.

    Here's an argument for placing the origins of western Christianity there in any case...

    Henri Tessier - The African roots of Latin Christianity http://www.30giorni.it/articoli_id_3553_l3.htm

    Christians in Gafsa still speaking Latin in the 12th century: https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=usUjj9OV9l0C&pg=PA99&lpg=PA99&dq=gafsa+christianity&source=bl&ots=HsTPFKvSKd&sig=-bpW-QkG3ef40emnLUuTHcSa9ns&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwj6y7XYo_3UAhUQfFAKHSqDAN4Q6AEIPjAJ#v=onepage&q=gafsa%20christianity&f=false
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #378 - July 10, 2017, 12:21 AM

    Quote
    Milied (Christmas) originates from Mawlid, the Islamic celebration of the birth of the Prophet Muhammad.

    I call shenanigans on this one. Some Muslims or sort-of Muslims might have celebrated the birth of the Prophet 'Isa as well. Sura 19 and the Dome of the Rock call blessings upon 'Isa yawma wulidtu.

    Either way it is not hard to imagine a Maltese Christian translating "Nativitas" into "Mawlid", not knowing a better Arabic word.
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #379 - July 10, 2017, 08:11 PM

    Jeremy Johns - 'Fings ain’t wot they oughto be’: making things and the art history of early and medieval Islamic societies.
    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=yQ5nfS9nH_M
    Jeremy Johns - Fāṭimid Fusṭāt and Norman Palermo
    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=x-vUQdCyQzA
    Jeremy Johns - Islamic Art in Norman Sicily
    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=hWB1ZW-_Yd0
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #380 - July 11, 2017, 11:56 AM

    Charles Burnett - The Coherence of the Arabic-Latin Translation Program in Toledo in the Twelfth Century

    https://is.muni.cz/el/1421/podzim2008/MED01/um/Burnett_Charles_2001.pdf
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #381 - July 12, 2017, 09:40 AM

    New Book



    Cemil Aydin - The Idea of the Muslim World

    http://www.hup.harvard.edu/catalog.php?isbn=9780674050372
    Quote
    When President Barack Obama visited Cairo in 2009 to deliver an address to Muslims worldwide, he followed in the footsteps of countless politicians who have taken the existence of a unified global Muslim community for granted. But as Cemil Aydin explains in this provocative history, it is a misconception to think that the world’s 1.5 billion Muslims constitute a single religio-political entity. How did this belief arise, and why is it so widespread? The Idea of the Muslim World searches for the intellectual origins of a mistaken notion and explains its enduring allure for non-Muslims and Muslims alike.

    Conceived as the antithesis of Western Christian civilization, the idea of the Muslim world emerged in the late nineteenth century, when European empires ruled the majority of Muslims. It was inflected from the start by theories of white supremacy, but Muslims had a hand in shaping the idea as well. Aydin reveals the role of Muslim intellectuals in envisioning and essentializing an idealized pan-Islamic society that refuted claims of Muslims’ racial and civilizational inferiority.

    After playing a key role in the politics of the Ottoman Caliphate, the idea of the Muslim world survived decolonization and the Cold War, and took on new force in the late twentieth century. Standing at the center of both Islamophobic and pan-Islamic ideologies, the idea of the Muslim world continues to hold the global imagination in a grip that will need to be loosened in order to begin a more fruitful discussion about politics in Muslim societies today.


    Read an excerpt from the introduction: http://harvardpress.typepad.com/hup_publicity/2017/05/the-idea-of-the-muslim-world-cemil-aydin.html

    Interview with Cemil Aydin: http://www.hurriyetdailynews.com/interview-cemil-aydin-on-the-idea-of-the-muslim-world.aspx?PageID=238&NID=112770&NewsCatID=386
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #382 - July 12, 2017, 10:57 AM



    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=opjPr59Sg-U

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b5mhKzqI1QY

    His Islam and his understanding of Islam is shaped  by his early years in Turkey

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #383 - July 13, 2017, 07:17 PM

    His Islam and his understanding of Islam is shaped  by his early years in Turkey

    No doubt. This New Books in Islamic Studies interview gives an idea of where he's coming from.

    Listen to the podcast: http://newbooksnetwork.com/cemil-aydin-the-idea-of-the-muslim-world-a-global-intellectual-history-harvard-up-2017/
    Quote
    Almost daily in popular media the Muslim World is pinpointed as a homogeneous entity that stands separate and parallel to the similarly imagined West. But even scratching the surface of the idea of a Muslim World reveals the geographic, social, linguistic, and religious diversity of Muslims throughout the world. So what work is performed through the employment and use of this phrase? And in what context did the idea of the Muslim World emerge?

    Cemil Aydin, Associate Professor of History at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, tackles these questions in his wonderful new book The Idea of the Muslim World: A Global Intellectual History (Harvard University Press, 2017). It in he weaves distant and interconnecting social, intellectual, and political histories of modern Muslims societies with clarity and detail. Altogether, he reveals the complex story of how the concept is constructed as a device intended to point to a geopolitical, religious, and civilizational unity among Muslims. The term is defined and employed by Muslim and non-Muslim actors alike across imperial and national contexts over the past nearly 150 years. In our conversation we discussed the justifications for imperial conflicts, the effects of Christian nationalistic liberation and the colonization of Muslims, orientalism, social Darwinism, the racialization of Muslims, the global role of the Ottomans, European and Russian imperialism, Muslim modernists thinkers, the effects of the World Wars, and the changing political landscape of the late 20th century.

  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #384 - July 14, 2017, 04:41 PM

    Interview with Sabine Schmitdtke - Islamic Studies at the Institute for Advanced Study

    https://www.ias.edu/ideas/schmidtke-ias-islamic-studies
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #385 - July 14, 2017, 08:21 PM

    The New Cambridge History of Islam Volume 1 The Formation of the Islamic World Sixth to Eleventh Centuries

    http://library.ut.ac.ir/documents/381543/3585030/%28Volume%201%29-Cambridge%20University%20Press%20%282010%29.pdf
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #386 - July 14, 2017, 10:51 PM

    The New Cambridge History of Islam Volume 1 The Formation of the Islamic World Sixth to Eleventh Centuries

    http://library.ut.ac.ir/documents/381543/3585030/%28Volume%201%29-Cambridge%20University%20Press%20%282010%29.pdf

    that is a great book to have a pdf file  as reference to educate robots of Islam  dear zeca..  funny thing is none of those authors have Islamic background ..  if you find such books/volumes I would suggest  that you should add them in that folder  Freely down loadable  Books on Pro-Islam and anti Islam..

    with best regards
    yeezevee

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #387 - July 15, 2017, 10:00 AM

    Nathan Hofer - Identity and Commentary in the Sufi Tradition (review of Feryal Salem's The Emergence of Early Sufi Piety and Sunnī Scholasticism: ʿAbdallāh b. al-Mubārak and the formation of Sunnī Identity in the Second Islamic Century)

    http://marginalia.lareviewofbooks.org/identity-commentary-sufi-tradition/
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #388 - July 15, 2017, 10:03 AM

    Yeez has posted links to the other New Cambridge History of Islam volumes here:

    https://www.councilofexmuslims.com/index.php?topic=19495.msg871239#msg871239
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #389 - July 15, 2017, 01:41 PM

    Nathan Hofer - Identity and Commentary in the Sufi Tradition (review of Feryal Salem's The Emergence of Early Sufi Piety and Sunnī Scholasticism: ʿAbdallāh b. al-Mubārak and the formation of Sunnī Identity in the Second Islamic Century)

    http://marginalia.lareviewofbooks.org/identity-commentary-sufi-tradition/


    Feryal Salem.....Feryal Salem......Feryal Salem.. The lady  with Burqa Brain....



    that professing professor should join the cemb forum to learn about Islam and how to think with-in Islam around Islam  and out of Islam ....

    http://www.hartsem.edu/faculty/feryal-salem/

    Quote
    Feryal Salem
    Assistant Professor of Islamic Scriptures and Law
    Co-Director, Islamic Chaplaincy Program
    Associate Editor, The Muslim World

    Background
    Ph.D. (The University of Chicago)
    M.A. (The University of Chicago)
    B.A. (Wayne State University)
    Biography
    Dr. Feryal Salem is Assistant Professor of Islamic Scriptures and Law at the Macdonald Center for the Study of Islam and Christian-Muslim Relations, Co-Director of the Islamic Chaplaincy Program, and Associate Editor of the Muslim World at Hartford Seminary. Her research specializes on early Islamic thought with an emphasis on the foundations of Islamic scripture, hadith methodology, Sufism, and hermeneutics in classical Islamic texts. She received her Ph.D. in Islamic Studies from the University of Chicago’s Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations.  Her forthcoming book, The Emergence of Early Sufi Piety and Sunni Scholasticism: ‘Abdallah b. al-Mubarak and the Formation of Sunni Identity in the Second Islamic Century, which will be published as a part of Brill’s Islamic History and Civilization series, explores the formative period of Islamic thought as embodied in the foundational role of Ibn al-Mubarak. It also examines related topics such as the development of Islamic theology, law, prophetic traditions (hadith) and Sufism as part of the Islamic scholarly tradition.


    Lot of Islamic intellectuals    in Islam have written lots of books without using their brain

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Previous page 1 ... 11 12 1314 Next page « Previous thread | Next thread »