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 Topic: Random Islamic History Posts

 (Read 41619 times)
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  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #30 - May 06, 2015, 07:26 PM

    Quote
    I thought the Ottomans were at a technological disadvantage.

    Giancarlo Casale talks about this in his New Books interview. I can't remember the details but they made use of galleys (with oars) for a tactical advantage against the Portuguese in the Indian Ocean. He points out that galleys were standard in the Mediterranean at the time, for the Spanish as well, so the Ottomans weren't at a disadvantage there. The interview is worth listening to.
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #31 - May 06, 2015, 08:32 PM

    It seems the med and ships for local fighting are not up to crossing oceans!

    http://boards.straightdope.com/sdmb/showthread.php?t=640948

    When you are a Bear of Very Little Brain, and you Think of Things, you find sometimes that a Thing which seemed very Thingish inside you is quite different when it gets out into the open and has other people looking at it.


    A.A. Milne,

    "We cannot slaughter each other out of the human impasse"
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #32 - May 06, 2015, 08:39 PM

    http://www3.nd.edu/~undpress/excerpts/P01451-ex.pdf

    Quote
    An Early Modern Dialogue with Islam: Antonio de Sosa’s Topography of Algiers (1612) is the first English translation of a riveting chronicle of European and North African cultural contacts. Written by the Portuguese cleric Doctor Antonio de Sosa while he was held prisoner in Algiers between 1577 and 1581, and published posthumously in Spain thirty years later (1612), the Topography is a fascinating eyewitness account of cultural life in Algiers near the end of the sixteenth century.

    No other European work takes us so deeply into the quotidian life of an Islamic city during the early modern period, a time of expansion and glory for the Ottoman Empire and its territories, especially for its farthest western province, the Turkish-Algerian Regency. In 1519, at the culmination of a seven-years’ war of conquest of the Barbary Coast, Khayr al-Din Barbarossa, the most formidable of all corsairs operating in the western Mediterranean, sought help from Sultan Selim I against the Spaniards, offering to place Algiers under the mantle of the Ottoman Empire.1 Algiers soon became a sandjak, or province, attached to the Ottoman Porte, while Barbarossa obtained the title of governor-general, as well as two thousand Turkish janissaries and artillery, a force later expanded by four thousand other Levantine Muslims and corsairs who enlisted in the Algerian militia.

    During the next fifty years, the influx of Turks, Christian converts to Islam, and corsairs from all over the world turned Algiers into the greatest of the North African seaports dedicated to privateering. The arrival of thousands of Christian slaves and booty, seized each year in attacks on the coasts of Spain and Italy or its islands and on Chris- tian ships that ventured into the Mare Nostrum, turned Algiers into the
    ....


    "Corsair" is of course the original Portuguese ocean going ship. Googling  Islam Corsair has fascinating results!

    When you are a Bear of Very Little Brain, and you Think of Things, you find sometimes that a Thing which seemed very Thingish inside you is quite different when it gets out into the open and has other people looking at it.


    A.A. Milne,

    "We cannot slaughter each other out of the human impasse"
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #33 - May 06, 2015, 08:49 PM

    Quote
    Quote
    Operations in the Atlantic Ocean[edit]
    Starting from the early 17th century, the Ottoman fleet began to venture into the Atlantic Ocean (earlier, Kemal Reis had sailed to the Canary Islands in 1501, while the fleet of Murat Reis the Elder had captured Lanzarote of the Canary Islands in 1585).[3] In 1617 the Ottoman fleet captured Madeira in the Atlantic Ocean, before raiding Sussex, Plymouth, Devon, Hartland Point, Cornwall and the other counties of western England in August 1625.[3] In 1627 Ottoman naval ships, accompanied by Barbary corsairs under the leadership of Murat Reis the Younger, captured the Isle of Lundy in the Bristol Channel, which served as the main base for Ottoman naval and privateering operations in the North Atlantic for the next five years.[4] They raided the Shetland Islands, Faroe Islands, Denmark-Norway, Iceland and Vestmannaeyjar.[3][5][6] Between 1627 and 1631 the same Ottoman force also raided the coasts of Ireland and Sweden.[3][7][8] Ottoman ships later appeared off the eastern coasts of North America, particularly being sighted at the English colonies like Newfoundland and Virginia.[3]



    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ottoman_Navy

    When you are a Bear of Very Little Brain, and you Think of Things, you find sometimes that a Thing which seemed very Thingish inside you is quite different when it gets out into the open and has other people looking at it.


    A.A. Milne,

    "We cannot slaughter each other out of the human impasse"
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #34 - May 06, 2015, 08:51 PM

    I'll put in a recommendation here for this popular history of the 15th and 16th century conflict between the Portuguese and Spanish on one side and the Ottomans and North Africans on the other.



    Barnaby Rogerson - The Last Crusaders

    Quote
    The Last Crusaders is narrative history at its richest and most compelling. It is about the carnage of Lepanto, the conquests of Don Juan, the pyramid of Spanish skulls that Dragut built in Jerba, about how the Spanish stabled their horses on a litter of Korans, the life of galley slaves, gunpowder, the casting of cannon and gold.

    This book is about the last great conflict between the East and the West. It is about the titanic struggle between Hapsburg-led Christendom and the Ottoman empire in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. Though it focuses on the great naval campaigns and the ferocious struggle to dominate the North African shore it was also, in its way, the first world war. The conflict spread out along trade routes into the Atlantic, Red Sea, Persian Gulf and across the Sahara. There was even a plan hatched for taking the war into the Caribbean. It consumed nations and cultures, destroyed dynasties, flattened cities and depopulated provinces. Yet the borders they fought for stand to this day as defining frontiers - the dividing lines between languages, nations and religions.

    http://www.amazon.co.uk/The-Last-Crusaders-Battle-Dominion/dp/0316861243


    Review

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/books/bookreviews/7866055/The-Last-Crusaders-The-Hundred-Year-Battle-for-the-Centre-of-the-World-by-Barnaby-Rogerson.html
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #35 - May 07, 2015, 04:04 PM



    Pirates of the Mediterranean

    Emrah Safa Gürkan - Corsairs and the Ottoman Mediterranean
    Quote
    Much like pirates, corsairs performed raids on coastal populations and interrupted shipping in the Mediterranean. However, unlike pirates, corsairs had the legal backing of sovereign states from among both the Ottomans and their European rivals who sponsored corsair activities in maritime borderland regions such as North African and the Eastern Mediterranean. In this episode, Emrah Safa Gürkan discusses the role of these go-betweens in the early modern world and suggests new ways of thinking about corsairs outside of the Christianity vs. Islam dichotomy.

    Listen to the podcast at: http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2012/10/ottoman-empire-pirates-barbary-history.html


    Dissertation and articles by Emrah Safa Gürkan

    http://29mayis.academia.edu/esg

    His review of Giancarlo Casale's The Ottoman Age of Exploration

    http://www.academia.edu/8997033/Review_of_Giancarlo_Casale_The_Ottoman_Age_of_Exploration
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #36 - May 09, 2015, 09:44 AM

    World War One Through Arab Eyes

    Quote
    There is a story other than the mainstream European narrative. It is not told as often but was of huge importance during the war and of lasting significance afterwards. It is the story of the Arab troops who were forced to fight on both sides but whose contribution is often forgotten.

    They fought as conscripts for the European colonial powers occupying Egypt, Morocco, Algeria and Tunisia - and for the Ottomans on the side of Germany and the Central Powers. The post-war settlement would also shape the Middle East for the next hundred years.

    In this three-part series, Tunisian writer and broadcaster Malek Triki explores the events surrounding World War One and its legacy from an Arab perspective.

    Watch the documentary series at: http://www.aljazeera.com/programmes/specialseries/2014/11/world-war-one-through-arab-eyes-20141114133936678600.html
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #37 - May 09, 2015, 11:13 AM

    Are Moroccans and Algerians Arab?

    I am not an Essex guy, although I was born 20 miles away!

    When you are a Bear of Very Little Brain, and you Think of Things, you find sometimes that a Thing which seemed very Thingish inside you is quite different when it gets out into the open and has other people looking at it.


    A.A. Milne,

    "We cannot slaughter each other out of the human impasse"
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #38 - May 09, 2015, 11:26 AM

    I suppose some are and some aren't. I'm not sure how much the Arab identity there owes to later nationalism. Certainly in Algeria there was a push to promote an Arab rather than Berber or French speaking identity after independence.
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #39 - May 09, 2015, 11:56 AM

    Quote
    Are Moroccans and Algerians Arab?

    I am not an Essex guy, although I was born 20 miles away!

    I suppose some are and some aren't. I'm not sure how much the Arab identity there owes to later nationalism. Certainly in Algeria there was a push to promote an Arab rather than Berber or French speaking identity after independence.



    Islam/Islamic scriptures have some very unique rules., If people follow  strictly those rules either voluntarily  or forced by others,  then down the road within two or  three generations it erase the  history of the so-called "New converts"

    No ... Moroccans and Algerians were NOT  Arabs., they were Berbers in fact many of them were Jewish.  like that CEMB Berberella    Cheesy

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #40 - May 12, 2015, 10:42 AM



    Maged S. A. Mikhail - From Byzantine to Islamic Egypt: Religion, Identity and Politics after the Arab Conquest

    http://www.amazon.co.uk/From-Byzantine-Islamic-Egypt-Religion/dp/1848859384
    Quote
    The conquest of Egypt by Islamic armies under the command of Amr ibn al-As in the seventh century transformed medieval Egyptian society. Seeking to uncover the broader cultural changes of the period by drawing on a wide array of literary and documentary sources, Maged Mikhail stresses the cultural and institutional developments that punctuated the histories of Christians and Muslims in the province under early Islamic rule. From Byzantine to Islamic Egypt traces how the largely agrarian Egyptian society responded to the influx of Arabic and Islam, the means by which the Coptic Church constructed its sectarian identity, the Islamisation of the administrative classes and how these factors converged to create a new medieval society. The result is a fascinating and essential study for scholars of Byzantine and early Islamic Egypt.


    Preview: http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=GJiCBAAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&source=gbs_ge_summary_r&cad=0#v=onepage&q&f=false


    Maged S. A. Mikhail - An Orientation to the Sources and Study of Early Islamic Egypt (641-868 ce)

    http://www.academia.edu/5579901/An_Orientation_to_the_Sources_and_Study_of_Early_Islamic_Egypt_641-868_ce_Study_of_Early_Islamic_Egypt
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #41 - May 12, 2015, 01:49 PM

    The Nizari Isma’ili Assassins: The Story behind Ubisoft’s “Assassin’s Creed”

    https://ballandalus.wordpress.com/2012/08/08/the-nizari-ismaili-assassins-the-story-behind-ubisofts-assassins-creed-2/
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #42 - May 12, 2015, 09:06 PM

    Meira Polliack - Re-thinking Karaism: Between Judaism and Islam

    https://www.academia.edu/10067001/Re-thinking_Karaism
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #43 - May 12, 2015, 09:26 PM



    Walter Kaegi - Muslim Expansion and Byzantine Collapse in North Africa

    http://www.cambridge.org/us/academic/subjects/history/european-history-450-1000/muslim-expansion-and-byzantine-collapse-north-africa?format=HB
    Quote
    Who ‘lost' Christian North Africa? Who won it and how? Walter Kaegi takes a fresh look at these perennial questions, with maps and on-site observations, in this exciting new book. Persisting clouds of suspicion and blame overshadowed many Byzantine attempts to defend North Africa, as Byzantines failed to meet the multiple challenges from different directions which ultimately overwhelmed them. While the uslims forcefully and permanently turned Byzantine internal dynastic and religious problems and military unrest to their advantage, they brought their own strengths to a dynamic process that would take a long time to complete – the transformation of North Africa. An impartial comparative framework helps to sort through identity politics, ‘Orientalism' charges and counter-charges, and institutional controversies; this book also includes a new study of the decisive battle of Sbeitla in 647, helping readers to understand what befell Byzantium, and indeed empires from Rome to the present.


    Preview: http://assets.cambridge.org/97805211/96772/excerpt/9780521196772_excerpt.pdf
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #44 - May 12, 2015, 10:01 PM





    hello zeca   and others who would like to read that book.. click the picture and download the file..  that is a good one to read to those who are interested in Islamic history..

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #45 - May 12, 2015, 11:01 PM

    Thanks yeez.
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #46 - May 13, 2015, 07:57 AM




    Is that a picture of Muhammad on that coin?
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #47 - May 13, 2015, 08:18 AM

    ^One of these I presume.

  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #48 - May 13, 2015, 01:04 PM

    Are Moroccans and Algerians Arab?

    I am not an Essex guy, although I was born 20 miles away!


    Algerians are Berber, but a huge portion was Arabized by Islam,  and they consider themselves as Arab,  we had a Turkish influence too, and in the south, we have a black population, there was a Jewish population in Algeria before the independence, but they left as they side with France.  the education system is in Arabic, so all Algerians speaker Arabic, but many as a second language.  so you can say we are Arabophone.

     

  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #49 - May 13, 2015, 01:43 PM

    ^ The vast majority is Berber, yes, but there are many families of Turkish and Arab origins.

    There are people in Kabylie who can't speak a word of Arabic.

    There are still Jews living in Algerian cities, but for obvious reasons they don't broadcast their Jewishness to everyone.

    He's no friend to the friendless
    And he's the mother of grief
    There's only sorrow for tomorrow
    Surely life is too brief
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #50 - May 13, 2015, 02:08 PM

    > There are people in Kabylie who can't speak a word of Arabic.

    of course, but mainly older people, the new generation had to know Arabic, as it is the language of education till the high school, even in my town ( east of Algeria), some older Berber ladies don't even understand Arabic

    > There are still Jews living in Algerian cities, but for obvious reasons they don't broadcast their Jewishness to everyone.

    i wouldn't know Smiley
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #51 - May 14, 2015, 10:22 PM



    Zeynep Türkyılmaz - Neither Muslim nor Christian: Crypto-Christians of Trabzon
    Quote
    Stories of insincere conversion under duress and secret Christian communities in the Ottoman Empire give the impression that many Christians lived in hiding from a Muslim majority. However, as Zeynep Türkyılmaz argues in this podcast, the phenomenon of Crypto-Christianity is really more complex, as diversity and heterogeneity among the Ottoman Empire's rural communities gave rise to "in-between" groups that did not conform to categories of identity being formulated in the center. In this episode, we focus on the Trabzon region in order to understand how local communities sought to define their participation in a rapidly transforming society and economy of the nineteenth century.

    Listen to the podcast: http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2013/04/religion-conversion-crypto-christians-trabzon.html
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #52 - May 14, 2015, 11:42 PM

    Ibn Khaldun on his encounter with Timur

    https://ballandalus.wordpress.com/2014/08/30/the-scholar-and-the-sultan-a-translation-of-the-historic-encounter-between-ibn-khaldun-and-timur/
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #53 - May 15, 2015, 08:04 PM



    The Iranian Origin of the Six Masters of Sunni Hadith

    https://ballandalus.wordpress.com/2015/05/15/the-iranian-origin-of-the-six-masters-of-sunni-hadith/
    Quote
    ....
    It is a little known fact that all six of the authors/compilers of the major books of Sunni ḥadīth—works that are together known as the Siḥāḥ al-Sitta—were of Persian/Iranian origin. Interestingly, these eminent figures are only six of hundreds of other Iranian scholars who were central to the shaping of the Sunni religious and intellectual tradition. In a scheme of early medieval Islamic history which is dominated by Arabo-centrism and in a contemporary world in which the association between Iran and Shi’ism is so central that one cannot think of one without the other, this fact of the Persian or Iranian origin of some of the most important figures of authority in Sunni Islam becomes increasingly relevant in challenging the dominant narratives and assumptions which continue to pervade the historical understanding (and contemporary vision) of Islam and Iran. It also emphasizes that some of the most important developments in traditionist Sunni scholarship in the medieval period occurred on the Iranian plateau.
    ....

  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #54 - May 15, 2015, 08:33 PM

    The Near East and the World Seminar Series - Christianity in the Near East: Past, Present...Future?

    links for videos of the talks at: http://www.princeton.edu/nep/events/near-east-the-modern-worl/index.xml
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #55 - May 16, 2015, 08:01 AM



    hello zeca   and others who would like to read that book.. click the picture and download the file..  that is a good one to read to those who are interested in Islamic history..


    i can't see anything about norrth africa in this book ?
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #56 - May 16, 2015, 08:19 AM



    It looks like yeez has put up a link for this book instead.

    Now that coin may well be intended as a representation of Muhammad.
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #57 - May 16, 2015, 10:51 AM

    Nah Zeca you're wrong. Looks like a Jedi or Sith Lord with a lightsaber.

    No free mixing of the sexes is permitted on these forums or via PM or the various chat groups that are operating.

    Women must write modestly and all men must lower their case.

    http://www.ummah.com/forum/showthread.php?425649-Have-some-Hayaa-%28modesty-shame%29-people!
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #58 - May 16, 2015, 06:32 PM

    There's an excerpt from "Muslim Expansion and Byzantine Collapse in North Africa" here (which, as an excerpt, is more likely to be, uh, legal to download):
    http://www.medievalsicily.com/Docs/Uploads/Kaegi%20on%20Constans%20II.pdf

    Kaegi is not really a historian of Islam per se; he is a historian of the Byzantine and Arab militaries of the period.
  • Random Islamic History Posts
     Reply #59 - May 16, 2015, 07:52 PM

    Maryam Patton - The early history of Arabic printing in Europe

    http://jhiblog.org/2015/04/15/the-early-history-of-arabic-printing-in-europe/
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