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Theme Changer

 Topic: Qur'anic studies today

 (Read 135336 times)
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  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1740 - February 02, 2018, 02:54 PM

    Thread: https://mobile.twitter.com/PhDniX/status/959367734407630848
    Quote
    Is this inscription, which reads ʿUmar al-Ḫaṭṭāb, the name of the second Islamic caliph, an autograph of said caliph, or a forgery? Frédéric Imbert suggests that it might be genuine; Paleographically, this seems impossible to me.

  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1741 - February 03, 2018, 04:53 PM

    Research project - Qur’anic Commentary: An Integrative Paradigm

    http://www.pmb.ox.ac.uk/news/professor-nicolai-sinai-receives-£1-5m-european-research-council-grant-fund-‘qur’anic-commentary
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1742 - February 04, 2018, 07:55 PM

    Robert Hoyland - The Language of the Qur'an and Rip van Winkle

    https://www.academia.edu/35409181/The_Language_of_the_Quran_and_Rip_van_Winkle
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1743 - February 06, 2018, 03:31 AM

    Thanks for all of the posts here! I have a lot of reading too, but this is a wealth of information.

    I have a question for anyone here. Do you guys know if there is any research happening on Islam in Kerala in South India?

    The state of Kerala has the oldest mosque in India, the Cheraman Juma Mosque, which was built in 629 AD, although it was renovated a few decades ago. Islam spread in Kerala through trade routes between Arabs and Indians.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cheraman_Juma_Mosque

    I was thinking that if researchers could find more research about early Islam in Kerala, specifically what they believed, how they practiced, if their Quran was the same as everyone else's, how local Hindus and Christians perceived the Muslims, etc, then they could find out more information about early Islam as whole.

    Plus, I feel that it would be easier to do research about one of the oldest mosques in India versus an old mosque in the Middle East, where there's too much chaos to do proper research.
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1744 - February 06, 2018, 04:18 AM

    Thanks for all of the posts here! I have a lot of reading too, but this is a wealth of information.

    Quote
    I have a question for anyone here. Do you guys know if there is any research happening on Islam in Kerala in South India?

    The state of Kerala has the oldest mosque in India, the Cheraman Juma Mosque, which was built in 629 AD, although it was renovated a few decades ago. Islam spread in Kerala through trade routes between Arabs and Indians.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cheraman_Juma_Mosque



    hello   kb999   those so-called mosques of Islam ((IF THEY WERE REALLY BUILT IN AND AROUND THE YEAR 630)) that are allegedly built before the death of alleged Prophet of Islam (Muhammad)    and  built before that Islamic scripture Quran    MUST BE NOTHING TO WITH PRESENT QURANIC ISLAM AND SUNNH and they must  be pagan prayer houses of middles eastern migrants anywhere from Yemen to  Oman, Eastern Arabia.

    please read this time line of Islam
     
    https://www.councilofexmuslims.com/index.php?topic=22184.msg639620#msg639620
    https://www.councilofexmuslims.com/index.php?topic=22184.msg639631#msg639631

    Quote
    I was thinking that if researchers could find more research about early Islam in Kerala, specifically what they believed, how they practiced, if their Quran was the same as everyone else's, how local Hindus and Christians perceived the Muslims, etc, then they could find out more information about early Islam as whole.

    Plus, I feel that it would be easier to do research about one of the oldest mosques in India versus an old mosque in the Middle East, where there's too much chaos to do proper research.

    THERE WAS NO QURAN AT THAT TIME...

    with best wishes
    yeezevee

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1745 - February 07, 2018, 05:13 PM

    Thread: https://mobile.twitter.com/shahanSean/status/960926361039917057
    Quote
    *Quran thread* One of the more fascinating questions to me is the question of whether or not the Qurʾan was transmitted with grammatical ‘errors’ in the canonical recitations -- basically: are there any 'typos' in the oral Qur'an?


    Also: https://mobile.twitter.com/PhDniX/status/961215063574110208
    Quote
    Great thread by @shahanSean, asked for my opinion, which I'll do here as a separate thread.

  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1746 - February 07, 2018, 05:45 PM

    Claire Clivaz and Sara Schulthess - On the Source and Rewriting of 1 Corinthians 2.9 in Christian, Jewish, and Islamic Traditions

    https://serval.unil.ch/resource/serval:BIB_A7F5E9A51548.P001/REF
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1747 - February 07, 2018, 06:09 PM

    Article behind a paywall but going off the abstract it looks interesting.

    Fred Donner - Talking about Islam's origins

    https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/bulletin-of-the-school-of-oriental-and-african-studies/article/talking-about-islams-origins-1/31AC247FCBBE328951FC1FC9A3F9ABED
    Quote
    Neither of the terms commonly used to describe the seventh-century expansion of the movement that comes to be called Islam – “the Islamic conquests” or “the Arab conquests” – is satisfactory; both terms are anachronistic and in some ways misleading; yet there is, at present, no clear candidate for an alternative terminology. This article discusses the weaknesses of existing nomenclatures, with reference to relevant primary sources, and the conceptual problems the traditional nomenclatures pose in the context of an extensive review of scholarly literature from roughly 1900 to the present. It offers a few suggestions for possible new terminologies, but essentially opens the question for further discussion.

    Quote
    2 As I was completing the draft of this article, Webb Peter's book Imagining the Arabs: Arab Identity and the Rise of Islam (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2016) […] appeared; it treats a number of the points made below, particularly in the second half of this essay, often in considerably greater detail. As Webb's conclusions mainly agree with my own, I could have cited his work in almost every paragraph, but have limited myself to a few citations where overlap is especially close.

  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1748 - February 07, 2018, 06:18 PM

    Aaron Hughes reviews Peter Webb’s Imagining the Arabs: Arab Identity and the Rise of Islam

    https://books.google.co.uk/books?hl=en&lr=&id=kC42DwAAQBAJ&oi=fnd&pg=PA104&ots=CeK4wn90ka&sig=9W1MmFLDbVgGcuW5eEoTKWuZJsY&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q&f=false
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1749 - February 07, 2018, 07:41 PM

    Fred Donner - Was Marwān ibn al-Ḥakam the First Real Muslim?

    https://www.academia.edu/29675775/Was_Marwān_ibn_al-Ḥakam_the_First_Real_Muslim_2014_
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1750 - February 08, 2018, 01:19 PM

    Donner recounts the traditional account about Marwān. Nihil nove sub sole. As this guy has left nothing (coins, scripture, etc) one cannot know anything real about him.
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1751 - February 08, 2018, 01:32 PM

    What about donner kebab?

    `But I don't want to go among mad people,' Alice remarked.
     `Oh, you can't help that,' said the Cat: `we're all mad here. I'm mad.  You're mad.'
     `How do you know I'm mad?' said Alice.
     `You must be,' said the Cat, `or you wouldn't have come here.'
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1752 - February 11, 2018, 02:02 PM

    Manfred Kropp - Orientalism and Dialogue of Cultures: Orientalism and Arabs before Islam

    https://www.academia.edu/2463660/Orientalism_and_Dialogue_of_Cultures_Orientalism_and_Arabs_before_Islam
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1753 - February 11, 2018, 07:04 PM

    Thread on interest in Qur’anic studies in Persian: https://mobile.twitter.com/GabrielSaidR/status/961942655075840000
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1754 - February 11, 2018, 09:38 PM

    Some short videos from academics at Leiden

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?list=PLHV6fVN0h4gFnNAva_UIUp0LQrn70CRze&params=OAFIAVgD&v=YI0HBPvG3Zc&mode=NORMAL https://m.youtube.com/watch?list=PLHV6fVN0h4gFnNAva_UIUp0LQrn70CRze&params=OAFIAVgF&v=c3KcprddoM4&mode=NORMAL https://m.youtube.com/watch?list=PLHV6fVN0h4gFnNAva_UIUp0LQrn70CRze&params=OAFIAVgG&v=GK4PQpirHE0&mode=NORMAL
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1755 - February 12, 2018, 04:43 PM

    Threads on Qur’anic Arabic from Marijn van Putten

    https://mobile.twitter.com/PhDniX/status/963030503241732097

    https://mobile.twitter.com/PhDniX/status/963071497437925376
    Quote
    When such forms are attested in early papyri and inscriptions, they are considered colloquialisms shining through in written Classical Arabic. This simply is anachronistic. The literary standard of Classical Arabic did not exist in the early Islamic period.

    The language of the Quranic Consonantal Text clearly has such "Middle Arabic", if the Quran doesn't establish the literary norm, what exactly *would* establish the literary norm? We have to be very careful not to project the norm of the 9th c. grammarians onto the 7th century.

  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1756 - February 15, 2018, 10:59 AM

    Thread: https://mobile.twitter.com/richheffron/status/963918464632094720
    Quote
    Thread: The Prophet Muḥammad's favorite she-camel and the confusion surrounding her name.

  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1757 - February 15, 2018, 12:40 PM

    New book:

    Arabic in Context: Celebrating 400 years of Arabic at Leiden University

    https://books.google.co.uk/books/about/Arabic_in_Context.html?id=cuEzDwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&source=kp_read_button&redir_esc=y

    It includes this article by Guillaume Dye:

    Traces of Bilingualism/Multilingualism in Qur'anic Arabic

    https://www.academia.edu/4730102/Traces_of_Bilingualism_Multilingualism_in_Quranic_Arabic
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1758 - February 15, 2018, 01:10 PM

    Guillaume Dye - Mapping the Sources of the Qur'anic Jesus

    https://www.academia.edu/33138609/Mapping_the_Sources_of_the_Quranic_Jesus
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1759 - February 15, 2018, 01:48 PM

    Quote
    Guillaume Dye - Mapping the Sources of the Qur'anic Jesus

    https://www.academia.edu/33138609/Mapping_the_Sources_of_the_Quranic_Jesus


    Quote
    The Qur’anic Jesus is a very ambivalent  figure    or better: a paradoxical figure.  And I would claim that it is  very hard to understand, not only what the Qur’ān tells about Jesus, but also what the way the Qur’ān copes with the character of Jesus tells about the Qur’ān itself, its  context(s) and its    genesis, if we do not decidedly acknowledge how much the Qur’anic Jesus is a very strange figure                ..........   Guillaume Dye Université libre de Bruxelles ULB)


    Forget Quranic Jesus .,   I could easily  rephrase the same words of Guillaume Dye  to Muhammad .. Prophet of Islam itself...

    Quote
    The Qur’anic Muhammad is a very ambivalent,  strange  paradoxical figure.   And I would claim that it is  very hard to understand, not only what the Qur’ān tells about Muammad, but also what the way the Qur’ān copes with the character of  Muhammad  tells about the Qur’ān itself, its  context(s) and its    genesis.

    And and if we do not decidedly acknowledge how much the Qur’anic Muhammad  is a very strange figure....  then we/academics  in religious departments   are simply rehashing  old stories for self serving purposes   and doing  enormous harm to the facts of origins of faith 
    ......  yeezevee rephrasing  Guillaume Dye  


    Not only say that  but  I could also defend those words because both  Muhammad and  Jesus  of Quran as well as NT  are/were   cartoon figures of story tellers/power hungry priests/ruling  families + foolish faith heads..

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1760 - February 16, 2018, 01:11 AM

    New book:

    Peter Schadler - John of Damascus and Islam: Christian Heresiology and the Intellectual Background to Earliest Christian-Muslim Relations

    https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=6NBCDwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover#v=onepage&q&f=false
    Quote
    How did Islam come to be considered a Christian heresy? In John of Damascus and Islam, Peter Schadler outlines the intellectual background of the Christian Near East that led John, a Christian serving in the court of the caliph in Damascus, to categorize Islam as a heresy. Schadler shows that different uses of the term heresy persisted among Christians, and then demonstrates that John’s assessment of the beliefs and practices of Muslims has been mistakenly dismissed on assumptions he was highly biased. The practices and beliefs John ascribes to Islam have analogues in the Islamic tradition, proving that John may well represent an accurate picture of Islam as he knew it in the seventh and eighth centuries in Syria and Palestine.

  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1761 - February 16, 2018, 09:51 AM

    John of Damascus on Islam: http://www.bombaxo.com/blog/st-john-of-damascus-on-islam/
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1762 - February 16, 2018, 01:44 PM


    That is interesting .,,  I am actually fan of   Kevin Edgecomb and I read him often  w.r.t  Bible stories.  In fact way back   I  copy/pasted  his post on Chronological Order of the Meccan Surahs  from his  bombaxo.com  .,   but but dear zeca  I question his article on this  St John of Damascus on Islam   which he wrote some 11 years ago...

    any way just for reading/future ref  let me add that whole article here

    Quote
    St John of Damascus on Islam

    St John of Damascus is a very important witness to early Islam. He was born into a very privileged family in Damascus (his grandfather had been the administrator of the city at the time the Muslims took it) and he grew up and served in the court of the caliph. He was entirely familiar with Islam (a name it did not yet possess, apparently), and thus what he has to say about it, and the context in which he places it, is of great historical importance. For one thing, this is a single chapter in his work On Heresies, part of his larger work, The Fountain of Knowledge. Thus, during his lifetime, St John did not consider Islam to yet be a separate religion, but rather a Christian heresy. In any case, he mentions several suras of the Qur’an by name, and refers most interestingly to one which is no longer extant. St John, in this work, as characteristically, pulls no punches. Enjoy.

    ~+~+~+~+~+~+~+~+~+~+~+~

    And there is also the up until now strong and people-deceiving superstition of the Ishmaelites, being the forerunner of Antichrist. And it is born from Ishmael, who was born from Hagar to Abraham, from which they are called Hagarenes and Ishmaelites. And they call them Saracens, as from Σαρρας κενοι (those empty of Sarah), because of what was said by Hagar to the angel: “Sarah has sent me away empty.” So then, these were idolaters and reverenced the morning star and Aphrodite, who they indeed named Khabar in their own language, which means great. Therefore, until the time of Heraclius, they were plainly idolaters. From that time and until now came up among them a false prophet called Mamed, who, having encountered the Old and New Testament, as it seems, having conversed with an Arian monk, he put together his own heresy. And under the pretext of seeming pious, attracting (?) people, he reported that a book was sent down to him from heaven by God. Therefore some of the compositions written by him in a book, worthy of laughter, which he handed down to them as an object of reverence.

    He says there is one God, the Maker of all things, neither having been begotten nor having begotten. He says Christ is the Word of God and His Spirit, only a creation and servant, and that he was born without seed from Mary the sister of Moses and Aaron. For he says the Word of God and the Spirit went into Mary and she bore Jesus who was a prophet and servant of God. And that the Jews, acting against the law, wanted to crucify him and having seized (him), they crucified his shadow. For Christ himself, they say, was not crucified nor did he die, for God took him to himself into heaven because he loved him.

    And he says this, that when Christ went up into the heavens, God questioned him, saying, “O Jesus, did you say that ‘I am the Son of God and God’?” And Jesus, they say, answered, “Have mercy on me, O Lord; you know that I did not say (that), nor am I too proud to be your servant, but men who have turned aside wrote that I said this word and lied about me, and are wandering.” And God, they say, answered him, “I know that you did not say this word.” And many other astonishing sayings in this same writing, worthy of laughter, he boasts God sent down to him.

    But we say, “And who is the witness that God gave the writing to him, or which of the prophets foretold that such a prophet would arise?” And they are at a loss, as Moses received on Mount Sinai, in the sight of all the people, the Law of God who appeared in cloud and fire and darkness and storm. And that all the prophets, from Moses and onward, foretold the coming of Christ, and that Christ is God, and the Son of God, being flesh, will come, and will be crucified, and will die, and will rise again, and he will be the judge of the living and the dead. And we say, “Why did your prophet not come in this way, with others witnessing about him, nor coming among you as God gave the Law to Moses on a smoking mountain with all the people watching, and, as you claim, provide this book, so you also might have certainty?” They answer that God does as he wills. We know this too, we say. But, we ask, how did the writing come down to your prophet? And they answer that while he was asleep the writing came upon him. And we jokingly say to them that since he received the writing while sleeping, and did not sense the activity, in him is fulfilled the popular proverb (“You are spinning me dreams”).

    Again we ask, “Why, when he commanded us in your writing not to do or to receive anything without witnesses, did you not ask him that ‘First you show through witnesses whether you are a prophet, and that you came from God, and which Scripture witnesses about you?'” They are silent, ashamed. To whom we say, “For good reason! Since it is not allowed for you to marry a woman without witnesses, nor to buy, nor acquire property (?), nor do you allow yourselves to have a donkey or an animal unwitnessed. For you indeed also have wives, and properties, and donkeys, and all the rest through witnesses, and you have only a faith and a writing unwitnessed. For he who handed this down to you has in no way an assurance, nor is any previous witness of him known, but he received this also while sleeping.”

    And they call us Associators, because, they say, we introduce an associate to God by saying Christ is the Son of God and God. To whom we say that this is what the Prophets and Scripture have handed down. And you, as you insist, accept the Prophets. If, therefore, we are wrong saying Christ is the Son of God, they also are who taught and handed it down to us. And some of them indeed say that we have allegorized the Prophets, imputing (sayings) to them. Others say that the Hebrews, hating (us), have deceived us, having written as from the Prophets, so that we might be destroyed.

    And again we say to them, “You say that Christ is the Word of God and the Spirit. How then do you rebuke us as ‘Associators’? For the Word and the Spirit are each of them unseparated from Him in Whom they have been born. If, therefore, in God is His Word, it is obvious he is also God. But if he is outside of God, as according to you, God is irrational (αλογος) and lifeless (απνους). Therefore, in avoiding to associate with God, you have mutilated him. But it would be better for you to say that he has an associate than to mutilate him, and represent him like a stone, or wood, or any of those insensible things. Thus, indeed, falsely accusing us, you call us ‘Associators.’ But we call you ‘Mutilators of God.'”

    They also accuse us as idolaters for reverencing the Cross, which they despise. And we say to them, “Why, therefore, do you rub yourselves against the stone by your Khabathan, and love kissing the stone?” And some of them say Abraham had relations with Hagar upon it, and others that he tied up the camel around it when about to sacrifice Isaac. And we respond to them, “The Scripture says that there was a mountain like a grove, and wood from which also Abraham cut for the whole burnt offering on which he laid Isaac, and that he left the donkeys with the servants. Therefore, from what source is your foolish saying? For there is no wood of a forest lying in that place, nor travelling by donkeys.” They are indeed ashamed. Nevertheless, they say the stone is of Abraham. Then we say, “If it is of Abraham, as you foolishly say, therefore are you not ashamed, kissing this thing only because Abraham had relations with a woman upon it, or that he tied up a camel? But you censure us because we show reverence to the Cross of Christ through which the strength of the demons and the deceit of the Accuser is destroyed?” And this thing which they say is a stone is the head of Aphrodite which they reverenced, who they also called Khabar, upon which also even up to now the shadow of an inscription appears to careful observers.

    As we have said, this Mamed composed many foolish sayings, and he laid upon each of them a title, like the writing “The Women,” in which also he plainly legislates (for a man) to take four wives and one thousand concubines if he is able, however many he might put under his hand, aside from the four wives. And he legislated to divorce whichever one he wishes, or if he wishes, also to take care of another, for this very reason: Mamed had a companion named Zeïd. This one had a beautiful wife, whom Mamed loved. Therefore, when they were sitting together, Mamed said, “Oh, by the way, God has ordered me to take your wife.” And he answered, “You are the Apostle; do as God has said to you. Take my wife.” Or rather, so we might tell it from the beginning, he said to him, “God has ordered me, that you divorce your wife” And he divorced. And after several days, he says, “But God has ordered that I will also take her.” Then he took (her) and committed adultery with her (and) made this law: “He who wills may divorce his wife, but if after divorcing, he would return to her, another must marry her; for it is not allowed to take (her back) if she has not been married by another. And even if a brother divorces, let his brother marry her, if he is willing.” And in the same writing, he transmits this message: “Plough the land which God has given to you, and beautify it” and do this, and in this way—so I might not say all the obscene things as he did.

    Again, there is the writing of the Camel of God, about which he says that there was a camel from God, and she drank a whole river, and she could not pass between two mountains through which she could not fit. Therefore, he says, a people was in that place, and indeed on one day they would drink the water and the camel on the next. And while drinking the water, she maintained (?) them by providing milk instead of water. Therefore those men, being wicked, rose up, he says, and killed the camel. But there was a small camel of her offspring which, he says, when the mother had been done away with, cried out to God, and He took her to Himself. To them we say, “From where was that camel?” And they say that it was from God. And we say, “Did any other couple with this camel?” And they say, “No.” We say, “Therefore how did she give birth? For we see you camel is without father, without mother, without genealogy. And having given birth, she suffered evil. But neither does the coupler appear, and the little camel was taken up. Therefore, why did not your prophet, to whom, as you say, God has spoken, learn about the camel: where she pastures, and if any drank milk (?) by milking this one? Or was she not at some time, like her mother having met evil men, destroyed? Or did she enter into Paradise, your forerunner, from whom is your river which you foolishly say is of milk? For you say three rivers are to flow for you in Paradise: of water, wine, and milk. If your forerunner camel is outside of Paradise, it is obvious that she has dried up from hunger and thirst, or that others are enjoying her milk. And your prophet is boasting foolishly as having spoken with God, for the mystery of the camel was not revealed to him. And if she is in Paradise, she again drinks the water, and waterless, you will dry up in the midst of the delights of Paradise. But if you desire wine from the river flowing by, since there is no flowing water, for the camel drank it all, you will be inflamed (?) drinking unmixed wine, and collapse (?) in drunkenness, and fall asleep. And also, being heavy-headed after sleep, and having a headache from the wine, you will forget the pleasures of Paradise. Therefore, why did your prophet not think of these things that might happen to you in the Paradise of delights? Nor did he consider about the camel, where she now lives. But neither did you ask him, as the dream-teller was telling you about the three rivers. But we tell you definitely, your wonderful camel has run ahead of you into the souls of donkeys, where you are soon to live like animals. And in that place is the outer darkness, and endless punishment, the roaring fire, the unsleeping worm, and demons of Tartarus.

    Mamed speaks again (in) the writing of The Table. And he says that Christ asked God for a table, and he gave it to him. For God, he says, said to him that “I have given to you and to yours an incorruptible table.”

    Again, the writing of The Cow, and some other foolish sayings worthy of laughter, I think I should skip because of their number. He legislated that they be circumcised, including the women, and also commanded not to keep the Sabbath, nor to be baptized, and to eat some of the things forbidden in the Law, and to avoid (some of) those it permitted. And he entirely forbade the drinking of wine.


    by the way there is very good debate under that article  ..worth reading..  as far as  John of Damascus on Islam    is concerned ..we have discussed  that subject ,many times

    Quote


    In fact  John of Damascus     WAS  NOT EVEN  BORN...NOT EVEN IN LIQUID FORM    Cheesy when alleged prophet of Islam died ..

     https://oca.org/saints/lives/2016/12/04/103473-martyr-john-of-damascus

    So how can I trust few words of  John of Damascus  on  Muhammad   when  he himself  heard stories of Muhammad from other people??

    with best wishes
    yeezevee

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1763 - February 17, 2018, 01:12 AM

    New book:

    Peter Schadler - John of Damascus and Islam: Christian Heresiology and the Intellectual Background to Earliest Christian-Muslim Relations

    https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=6NBCDwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover#v=onepage&q&f=false


    I need this book in PDF MP me if you can send me a copy...
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1764 - February 17, 2018, 01:40 AM

    About John Damascene .What is written about Muhammad by non Muslim is coming from the muhajirun. Nobody knew this figure before the take over of Palestine by Arabs. About John text "And there is also the up until now strong and people-deceiving superstition of the Ishmaelites..."   it seems clear that even if it looks the contrary, he never had in his hand an exemplar of the Quranic text.  How could it be possible that he do not relates the very strangeness of the text itself as related  heavily by Al Kindi (Christian Arab philosopher of the 9/10 c.) to show that this "book of God" is a non sense. That John Damascene does not tell anything about what "all" people who read the Quran realize when they read it. He had no access to the written text ; all he knows of it was recounted to him by his relations in Damascus.
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1765 - February 17, 2018, 09:43 AM

    I need this book in PDF MP me if you can send me a copy...

    There’s only the google preview unfortunately, and as it’s published by Brill it’s priced at €110. For now I think it’s for those with access to a university library.
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1766 - February 17, 2018, 01:13 PM

    There’s only the google preview unfortunately, and as it’s published by Brill it’s priced at €110. For now I think it’s for those with access to a University library.


    Well  that is because it is NOT just a  book  but a jounal.,  It is published with-in series  of volumes   as   The History of Christian-Muslim Relations  under  Middle East and Islamic Studies

    any ways.. another old book  on this subject is    Prof.  Daniel Sahas  of University of Waterloo,  



    John of Damascus on Islam: The "Heresy of the Ishmaelites."
    Daniel J. Sahas - 1972

    JOHN DAMASCENE IN CONTEXT: AN EXAMINATION OF “THE HERESY OF THE ISHMAELITES” WITH SPECIAL CONSIDERATION GIVEN TO THE RELIGIOUS, POLITICAL, AND SOCIAL CONTEXTS DURING THE SEVENTH AND EIGHTH CENTURY ARAB CONQUESTS

    that thesis is worth reading for  old references  on this subject

    Quote
    For now I think it’s for those with access to a University library.

     
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    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1767 - February 19, 2018, 10:26 AM

    Thanks to both of you.
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