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 Topic: Qur'anic studies today

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  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #7560 - September 12, 2019, 12:04 PM

    Quote
    You are focussing very much on 2:127.


    Not really. I focused here because of you and Marc Wink I have already (at length!) explained how I come to remember what Gallez had written because I had come to the same idea by another path. What Gallez wrote, was, for me, a confirmation of what I thought. But! Gallez or not, I would have not change my mind. And I did not see (yet) arguments which might convinced me that I'm wrong on this. I'm waiting.

    Quote
    Do you read the verse in the traditional way:
    And [mention] when Abraham was raising the foundations of the House and [with him] Ishmael, [saying], "Our Lord, accept [this] from us. Indeed You are the Hearing, the Knowing.
    Or do you read it differently? Something like:
    And then, Abraham will rebuild the foundations of the temple with Ismael...


    It does not change anything (for me...) Gallez feels compelled to change the tense, why not, I do not need that, I already explained why : imitation.Especially since that Arabs did not build with the Jews or Gallez 's Judeonazareans as they are sons of Abraham and Ishmael. they did not need it Wink
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #7561 - September 12, 2019, 12:48 PM

    ...........................Especially since that Arabs did not build with the Jews or Gallez 's Judeonazareans as they are sons of Abraham and Ishmael. they did not need it Wink

    In recent times that word is horribly misrepresented  with reference to Quran and origins of Islam...., many use that word in a hand waving way  keeping  present times Arabia and Islam .. but they use it in the same way for  ancient times  also..

    Who was Arab? who was NOT arab during OT, NT & even in Quran times??

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #7562 - September 12, 2019, 01:08 PM

    Quote
    Especially since that Arabs did not build with the Jews or Gallez 's Judeonazareans as they are sons of Abraham and Ishmael. they did not need it Who was Arab? who was NOT arab during OT, NT & even in Quran times??



    Considering they had not literature, one knows relatively well the Arabs of the 5,6,7th c.
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #7563 - September 13, 2019, 09:54 AM

    New book

    John Tolan - Faces of Muhammad: Western Perceptions of the Prophet of Islam from the Middle Ages to Today

    https://press.princeton.edu/titles/13520.html

    Read the introduction: http://assets.press.princeton.edu/chapters/i13520.pdf

    Tom Holland’s review: https://www.spectator.co.uk/2019/06/hostility-to-islam-has-disguised-a-host-of-other-prejudices/

    John Tolan on twitter: https://mobile.twitter.com/johnvtolan
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #7564 - September 13, 2019, 10:08 AM


    Considering they had not literature, one knows relatively well the Arabs of the 5,6,7th c.

    I am NOT sure about that ., There must be Arabic literature before Quran... Quran itself  tells us indirectly that there were Arabic poets before Islam... I mean before 5, 6, 7th century

    Quote
    Nay! say they: Medleys of dreams; nay! he has forged it; nay! he is a poet; so let him bring to us a sign as the former were sent ..............Al-Anbiyaa,  Verse #5

    And to say: What! shall we indeed give up our gods for the sake of a mad poet?.......As-Saaffaat,  , Verse #36

    Or do they say: A poet, we wait for him the evil accidents of time......... At-Tur,  Verse #30

    And it is not the word of a poet; little is it that you believe;............Al-Haaqqa, Verse #41


    those words from quran tells me indirectly Arabic script was there before Quran...  It is different if those Islamic heroes  burned  much of  Arabic prose and poetry ..literature  that was there before Islam...

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #7565 - September 13, 2019, 10:45 AM

    Quote
    I am NOT sure about that

    .

    I am. Wink

    Quote
    , There must be Arabic literature before Quran.


    Nope.
    Quote
      Quran itself  tells us indirectly that there were Arabic poets before Islam... I mean before 5, 6, 7th century ;  It is different if those Islamic heroes  burned  much of  Arabic prose and poetry ..literature 


    1/That there were Arabic poets before Islam, before 5, 6, 7th century seems clear.
    2/ One have no attestation of this "Arabic prose and poetry ..literature" from contemporary sources which knows relatively well the Arabs since the 4th c.
    " This "Arabic prose and poetry" is oral, not written down, therefore it is not literature. That's what makes the difference between an oral and literate culture.
    Poetry was  written down after Islam. Muslim historiographers (9th c. and later) said it was poetry before Islam.I'm not really sure of that, rather contemporaneous poetry.

  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #7566 - September 15, 2019, 09:31 AM

    New book

    Sean Anthony - Muhammad and the Empires of Faith

    https://www.academia.edu/40350641/Muhammad_and_the_Empires_of_Faith_Berkeley_University_of_California_Press_2020_
    Quote
    “Sean Anthony has written a marvelous book: deeply learned and engaging, it advances and deepens the discussion of how we should think about the ways Muslims remembered Mu?ammad and the relationship of the stories they told to the broader world in which Islam developed. I couldn’t put it down.”—Jack Tannous, author of The Making of the Medieval Middle East: Religion, Society, and Simple Believers

    In Muhammad and the Empires of Faith, Sean W. Anthony demonstrates how reading non-Muslim and Muslim sources in tandem with a critical eye can breathe new life into the historical study of Muhammad and the world that his message transformed. By placing these sources within the intellectual and cultural world of Late Antiquity, Anthony offers a fresh assessment of the earliest sources for Muhammad’s life, taking readers on a grand tour of the available evidence, and suggests what new insights stand to be gained from the techniques and methods pioneered by countless scholars over the decades in a variety of fields. Muhammad and the Empires of Faith offers both an authoritative introduction to the multilayered traditions surrounding the life of Muhammad and a compelling exploration of how these traditions interacted with the broader landscape of Late Antiquity.

  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #7567 - September 15, 2019, 09:45 AM

    Nope.
    1/That there were Arabic poets before Islam, before 5, 6, 7th century seems clear.
    2/ One have no attestation of this "Arabic prose and poetry ..literature" from contemporary sources which knows relatively well the Arabs since the 4th c.
    " This "Arabic prose and poetry" is oral, not written down, therefore it is not literature. That's what makes the difference between an oral and literate culture.


    Why should outside sources have paíd any attention to the existence of literature in Arabic before the conquests? How do we know that poetry wasn’t copied from written sources that haven’t survived?
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #7568 - September 15, 2019, 11:55 AM

    Quote
    Newly discovered early Islamic inscription that includes a prayer for "Āʾisha, Wife of the Prophet" (zawj al-nabī). To date, this may be the only known epigraphic reference to one of the Prophet Muḥammad's wives.

    https://mobile.twitter.com/azforeman/status/1173074924497440768
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #7569 - September 15, 2019, 12:07 PM

    Quote
    The beginning of wisdom in Qur'anic studies is acknowledgement of the fact that the Qur'an is an odd book about whose real textual history and production we know almost nothing.

    https://mobile.twitter.com/azforeman/status/1172816978081386497
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #7570 - September 15, 2019, 12:23 PM

    Quote
    Why should outside sources have paíd any attention to the existence of literature in Arabic before the conquests?

    Interesting question...
    Because (for me...) the world (Egypt to the Tigris) of this time is (full) of literature which frame the life of all in a different way that it was before the  (official) Christianization of Orient. Christianization (after the 4th c.) has paid attention to what it was written because of its general heresiological preoccupation. Considering this, there is therefore a natural specific attention to what it is written and by whom.
    On the other hand,  when one sees the different devices of Arabic script used in inscriptions, it is rather difficult to imagine that a literature could have been emerged before the Quran. Is Arabic (whatever the script used) inscriptions, literature? I do not think so but in the same time Arabic culture was not a "pure" oral culture due to those ones. The entering in a literary culture as one understand it is posterior to the emergence of the Quran (unless one finds something of course...)

    Quote
    How do we know that poetry wasn’t copied from written sources that haven’t survived?


    One does not know it. But (to my knowledge...) the 9th c. and later historiographers does not say it. They insists to the "pure" orality of it. One does understand very well why. The contrary might have mean that the Quran could have been written and not proclaimed as they say it (and especially as the Quran itself induces it, therefore what those historiographers will say, as the Quran is the book of God, whatever it says, is true.).
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #7571 - September 15, 2019, 12:31 PM



    Well... Wink  He will give his scenario... not so far of the narrative...
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #7572 - September 15, 2019, 12:41 PM

    The beginning of wisdom in Qur'anic studies is acknowledgement of the fact that the Qur'an is an odd book about whose real textual history and production we know almost nothing.

    Yes.
    That is why one should start to work.
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #7573 - September 15, 2019, 01:01 PM

    well here I take the fight

    I am. Wink

    No you are Not sure about THAT.............you are NOT certain about THAT..........

    Quote
    Nope.

    You are wrong., You must be wrong here.,  YES..........,  QURAN CAN NOT BE THE FIRST ARABIC MANUAL.. there must be some writings in Arabic before the present book .. It is just simple logic ...

    Quote
    1/That there were Arabic poets before Islam, before 5, 6, 7th century seems clear.

    I agree with that
    Quote
    2/ One have no attestation of this "Arabic prose and poetry ..literature" from contemporary sources which knows relatively well the Arabs since the 4th c.

    I do not agree with that ... Arabic language ..scripts.. alphabets evolved .. A language or any language  evolves with time ., Arabic is no exception to that rule  and Quran  is no exception to that simple rule .,,So ..A  book like Quran with wonderful Arabic  prose and poetry can not be the first book ., there must have been some writings in Arabic before Quran

    Quote
    " This "Arabic prose and poetry" is oral, not written down, therefore it is not literature. That's what makes the difference between an oral and literate culture.

    Quran before it became a book.. it itself was oral .therefore  Quranic poetry and prose must have been there before it became a book.. The book didn't fall from the sky..

    Quote
    Poetry was  written down after Islam. Muslim historiographers (9th c. and later) said it was poetry before Islam.I'm not really sure of that, rather contemporaneous poetry.

    by that you are indirectly saying Quran also was written by Muslim or Non Muslim historiographers  9th c. and later....

    Now the ball is in your court Altara..

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #7574 - September 15, 2019, 01:05 PM



    Well Sean Anthony  is late and  he is still going on the same ooooollllld path.. The new song  that Altara is singing on Mecca/Medina/Muhammad/Zam zam has lot more weight


    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #7575 - September 15, 2019, 01:42 PM

    Evidence of the existence of written literature can be elusive. Take Caucasian Albanian for example: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caucasian_Albanian_script
    Quote
    The first literary work in the Caucasian Albanian alphabet was discovered on a palimpsest in Saint Catherine's Monastery on Mount Sinai in 2003 by Dr. Zaza Aleksidze; it is a fragmentary lectionary dating to the late 4th or early 5th century AD, containing verses from 2 Corinthians 11, with a Georgian Patericon written over it.

    So it looks like literature in Caucasian Albanian existed for centuries but is only known from one manuscript.
    (Edit: actually two manuscripts: http://evangelicaltextualcriticism.blogspot.com/2009/08/caucasian-albanian-palimpsests-of-mt.html )

    How much can really be deduced from the absence of pre-Islamic manuscripts in Arabic?
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #7576 - September 15, 2019, 06:16 PM

    Philip Wood revíews Jack Tannous: https://brill.com/view/journals/me/25/3/article-p293_4.xml

    preview: https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=gViYDwAAQBAJ&pg=PA33&lpg=PA33&dq=jack+tannous+pdf&source=bl&ots=WGEVSmCYPE&sig=ACfU3U0I5lN0J_pkh2G9qx8pXEAmzP5j5g&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwiD4-SvuNPkAhVLBWMBHSSZDHY4FBDoATANegQIBRAB#v=onepage&q=jack%20tannous%20pdf&f=false
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #7577 - September 15, 2019, 09:36 PM

    Robin on written literature versus orality in Arabic (2000):

    from page 557:
    https://www.jstor.org/stable/4057669?read-now=1&refreqid=excelsior%3A177dd3b50b67d44762c771d7a90f3195&seq=49#page_scan_tab_contents

    Robin argues that there is plenty of evidence on "simple" written texts having existed, but probably no literary text since the pre-islamic script was simply not  adapted for that.
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #7578 - September 15, 2019, 10:35 PM

    Quote
    Evidence of the existence of written literature can be elusive.


    It can, yes. But generally it is not. This case seems  an exception which confirms the rule.Especially since, as you have remarked, that this literature recovered is Christian and the script used seems to be of Christian origin. Before the recovering of these mss one knew that it seemed that a Christian monk had created a script for Albanians and Armenian.
    Quote
    How much can really be deduced from the absence of pre-Islamic manuscripts in Arabic?

    I do think that Albanian situation has nothing to see with the Arab one, that is why one have recovered nothing. There is no Christian Arabic literature nor poetry literature, only inscriptions.
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #7579 - September 15, 2019, 11:42 PM

    Robin on written literature versus orality in Arabic (2000):

    from page 557:
    https://www.jstor.org/stable/4057669?read-now=1&refreqid=excelsior%3A177dd3b50b67d44762c771d7a90f3195&seq=49#page_scan_tab_contents

    Robin argues that there is plenty of evidence on "simple" written texts having existed, but probably no literary text since the pre-islamic script was simply not  adapted for that.

    Interesting paper of Robin.
    I consider the Quranic script as an evolution of the 512 Zebed inscription, confirmed by the 568 Harran inscription. Robin seemed persuaded (p.564) that it was impossible to write literature due to the highly defective script, only narrow topics because said he "it is even likely that certain passages could be interpreted in different ways" . He does not realize that it was what happened with the Quran ! It did not prevent it to be written Hahaha!  There was dozens of  qiraat... The other way to explain its existence then, is the "oral" proclamation written down. In his last paper, MVP establishes that all the mss one have are copied not from oral proclamation to the scribe, but from an exemplar to the scribe. There is no orality, there is a text that must be completed (homograph letters to be distinguished, vowels invented, etc) : the result was the (countless) qiraat the political power has retained 14. How much they were, 200, 400? one does not know : 14 have been kept at the end.
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #7580 - September 16, 2019, 06:17 AM

    On Robin and Arabic literature:

    Quote
    Robin seemed persuaded (p.564) that it was impossible to write literature due to the highly defective script, only narrow topics because said he "it is even likely that certain passages could be interpreted in different ways" .


    Quote
    He does not realize that it was what happened with the Quran ! It did not prevent it to be written Hahaha!  There was dozens of  qiraat..


    I think it is a natural evolution for people using a language in a limited way (for Arabic that seems to be administrative and short practical uniformed texts) to expand to a more intellectual use of the language. Probably the Quran was the first example and test of this expansion for Arabic. On top of that the reading difficulty might have been wished for since apparently for more than a century it has remained defective. Techniques to vocalize were plentiful in other semitic languages. It is not that difficult to do. And yet, the Quranic copyists didn't do it. It can't be out of ignorance.

    If we compare how the Germanic languages came out of the shadow of Latin we do see a different parcours. There first seemed to be a Latin administration with Latin literature. Slowly (with growing middle class?), the Germanic languages took over in all domains.

    For Arabic there first seems to have been a limited Arabic administration (also in trade?) and no Arabic (religious) literature. Then all of a sudden, Arabic took over the religious realm although technically it wasnt prepared for it.

    Was it because the neighboring semitic languages were quite close to the Arabic mother tongue? So unlike the Germanic speakers who didnt understand a jota of the Latin texts without a thorough education, the Arabic speakers managed quite well with the Aramaic and Geez texts?
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #7581 - September 16, 2019, 08:15 AM

    Here is a new video with Al Fadi and Jay Smith. Earlier I have pointed to them that Van Putten wrote that the variations in Qurans of today are mostly due to scribal errors and reflect the different readings. It seems as Fadi and Smith now respond to this and they say in this video that at least the corrections made in old Qurans have nothing to do with the different readings, but are such as standardization (mostly to Hafs) or changing the meaning of the text for political or other reasons.
    Under the video, they have written what their meanings are.
    When I am listening to Al Fadi and Jay Smith, it seems to me that Van Putten is trivializing the challenges with lots of corrections and why we today have at least 30 different Qurans, with thousands of variations.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-Qsf2Zfyx8w
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #7582 - September 16, 2019, 12:11 PM

    Quote
    I think it is a natural evolution for people using a language in a limited way (for Arabic that seems to be administrative and short practical uniformed texts) to expand to a more intellectual use of the language


    The point of Robin is about script, not language.You confuse the two.

    Quote
    Probably the Quran was the first example and test of this expansion for Arabic.


    I do think it is.
    Quote
    On top of that the reading difficulty might have been wished for since apparently for more than a century it has remained defective.


    I do not think that "wished" is the word. For me the text have been written like this, as a rasm, because there was no other way to write it as there was no diacritic and vowels; this was done after by people who own the text; each group has made his own version claiming that it was the "real" version of the "Prophet" ; they retained 14.
    Quote
    Techniques to vocalize were plentiful in other semitic languages. It is not that difficult to do. And yet, the Quranic copyists didn't do it. It can't be out of ignorance.


    It might be difficult to decide to borrow (the diacritical dots are syriac) from people (Christians) who are depicted as bad people by the text.  
    Quote
    If we compare how the Germanic languages came out of the shadow of Latin we do see a different parcour. There first seemed to be a Latin administration with Latin literature. Slowly (with growing middle class?), the Germanic languages took over in all domains.


    It is not an issue of language in the Arabic case, but script. Germans have adopted the Roman script without difficulties as they had not one before.
    Situations are not comparable.

    Quote
    For Arabic there first seems to have been a limited Arabic administration (also in trade?) and no Arabic (religious) literature. Then all of a sudden, Arabic took over the religious realm although technically it wasnt prepared for it.


    I (personally) do not know any "limited Arabic administration". There is no need of an "administration" for trade, only organisation.  Arabs spoke  their Arabic dialects and work with the defective script they had. You call this "administration" I do not.There was no Arab state. Arabization of  administration was made up by Abd al Malik (685-705). Before, it was a Roman one since the shifting of the power to Arabs (634-36). They had to learn "administration", it took them 50 years to learn it and then fired the Romans and replaced them by Arabs. Diacritical point was already used since 640 (PERF 558)

    Quote
    Then all of a sudden, Arabic took over the religious realm although technically it wasn't prepared for it.


    The assumption of Robin (technically Arabic script wasn't prepared for writing literature as the Quran ) is inexact. He is totally lost.
    I consider that the Quran is a text and not an oral "proclamation" written down as it is induced by the text itself (!).
    Dye was relatively embarrassed when he more or less says the same thing : that he doubts that the Quran is an oral "proclamation" Wink
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u8aIOYq5UwY
    Listen to him carefully...(59min)  : "I'm not at all convinced by this things' description..." (Hahaha!!!)
    I never was... Wink

    Quote
    Was it because the neighbouring Semitic languages were quite close to the Arabic mother tongue? So unlike the Germanic speakers who didn't understand a jota of the Latin texts without a thorough education, the Arabic speakers managed quite well with the Aramaic and Geez texts?


    1/ Yes.
    2/ Not comparable situation
    3/ Possibly.





  • Re: Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #7583 - September 16, 2019, 01:37 PM

    Robert Hoyland - The Jewish and/or Christian Audience of the Qur'an and the Arabic Bible

    https://www.academia.edu/38828301/The_Jewish_-_Christian_Audience_of_the_Quran_and_the_Arabic_Bible


    Hoyland on whether there was Christian literature in Arabic, page 37 onwards.
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #7584 - September 16, 2019, 01:50 PM



    that Question statement  in the first paragraph ".....or should we conclude some  familiarity with textual sources is necessary  to write......." can easily be answered from   the stories of  Bible in Quran... in some verses it is "WORD TO WORD" copy/pasting".,  taht  speaks volume of who wrote Quran and why? 

    Now that doesn't mean all the stories of  Quran are copy/pasted .,  A simple comparative reading of  bible verses from Luke 1-25  and Quran  verses from MARYAM 1-25 tells to any high school drop out .. they both tell exactly same stories

    That is  the reason why I often say Quran had multiple authors ., and Muhammad is multiple personalities from hadith stories...

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #7585 - September 16, 2019, 02:17 PM

    Altara,

    I am not confusing Arabic script with language here. We have not found pre-islamic Arabic literary texts written in another script either.
    The point is that no evidence exists of literary Arabic in whatever script. But there is ample evidence that there was more formular, limited use of Arabic, written in Arabic script or maybe other scripts.
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #7586 - September 16, 2019, 02:30 PM



    Manuscript Cultures: Mapping the Field (Studies in Manuscript Cultures)

    that is good book edited by by Dmitry Bondarev, Alessandro Gori , Lameen Souag., on the  origins of language and their scripts

    Quote
    Five Theories on the Origins of Language

    What was the first language? How did language begin—where and when? Until recently, a sensible linguist would likely respond to such questions with a shrug and a sigh. As Bernard Campbell states flatly in Humankind Emerging (Allyn & Bacon, 2005), "We simply do not know, and never will, how or when language began."

    It's hard to imagine a cultural phenomenon that's more important than the development of language. And yet no human attribute offers less conclusive evidence regarding its origins. The mystery, says Christine Kenneally in her book The First Word, lies in the nature of the spoken word:

    "For all its power to wound and seduce, speech is our most ephemeral creation; it is little more than air. It exits the body as a series of puffs and dissipates quickly into the atmosphere... There are no verbs preserved in amber, no ossified nouns, and no prehistorical shrieks forever spread-eagled in the lava that took them by surprise."
    The absence of such evidence certainly hasn't discouraged speculation about the origins of language. Over the centuries, many theories have been put forward—and just about all of them have been challenged, discounted, and often ridiculed. Each theory accounts for only a small part of what we know about language..............


    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #7587 - September 16, 2019, 02:32 PM

    Altara,

    I am not confusing Arabic script with language here. We have not found pre-islamic Arabic literary texts written in another script either.
    The point is that no evidence exists of literary Arabic in whatever script. But there is ample evidence that there was more formular, limited use of Arabic, written in Arabic script or maybe other scripts.

    according to experts on origins of Arabic language/script there were  30 or more Arabic scripts around 2-6 century BC..

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #7588 - September 16, 2019, 03:37 PM

    Ronny Vollandt - Arabic Versions of the Pentateuch A Comparative Study of Jewish, Christian, and Muslim Sources

    See chapter 3 for discussion of the possibility of earlier translations.
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #7589 - September 16, 2019, 05:50 PM

    Hoyland on whether there was Christian literature in Arabic, page 37 onwards.


    The evidence for a pre-Islamic Arabic Bible is indeed mostly circumstantial and relies on two key points.

    What does that mean?



    Secondly, there is the fact that a distinctively Arabic script began
    to be used by Arabophone Christian communities in Yemen and Syria 17
    from the late fifth century onwards, as is attested by a number of surviving
    inscriptions 18


    Ch.J. Robin, 2014: “Inscriptions antiques de la region de Najrān”, Académie des Inscriptions et Belles-Lettres: Comptes Rendus de l’année 2014, p. 1033-1128

    Yes it is the same script (Proto Quranic script) 100km North-East of Najran region ().  : Robin : "It seemed useful to mention the following graffiti, discovered in November 2014 and still insufficiently studied, because it illustrates a widespread use of Arabic writing on the eve of Islam." p.1111.
    Clearly it is Proto Quranic script, same as Zebed and Harran.

    In any case it would seem to be agreed by all that Biblical and quasi-
    Biblical narratives were circulating in Arabic

    Of course, but not in a translated written texts.

    whether only in oral form or in both oral and written form.

    Nope. He does not bring any evidence of a written form of "quasi-
    Biblical narratives."

    Although much of this material may have been spread orally, some of the allusions to the Bible in the Qu’rān are suggestive of a written context.

    Muhammad knew reading then, and was a specialist of Judaism and Christianity? Wink
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