Skip navigation
Sidebar -

Advanced search options →

Welcome

Welcome to CEMB forum.
Please login or register. Did you miss your activation email?

Donations

Help keep the Forum going!
Click on Kitty to donate:

Kitty is lost

Recent Posts


Rick and Morty practicall...
Today at 03:19 AM

Cowardice of Muslims
Yesterday at 10:31 PM

The New Koran
Yesterday at 08:58 PM

Very delicious
February 23, 2018, 07:05 PM

Pakistan: The Nation.....
February 23, 2018, 06:42 PM

Question-What is the best...
February 23, 2018, 06:39 PM

false?,,,,,,why?
February 23, 2018, 04:14 PM

antisemitism cause?
February 23, 2018, 01:37 PM

الحبيب من يشبه اكثر؟؟؟
by akay
February 23, 2018, 08:25 AM

Faithfreedom Forum
February 22, 2018, 07:04 PM

VeeduLive #8 Imtiaz Shams...
February 20, 2018, 10:17 PM

Random Islamic History Po...
February 20, 2018, 01:25 PM

Theme Changer

 Topic: Qur'anic studies today

 (Read 135398 times)
  • Previous page 1 ... 55 56 5758 59 Next page « Previous thread | Next thread »
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1680 - December 03, 2017, 07:00 PM



    thanks for that  link  zeca...that is a whole book ..  I like his preface  of his book
    Quote
    .............. The purpose of  this book is, therefore, neither to offend believers nor pander to non-believers, but  rather to serve as an    objective, critical, academic study to be appreciated by those of great understanding, who reflect upon the verses of the Qur’ān (Q 38:18, 29). ........

    well  there is plenty of pondering in that book for  non-believers and to those who are NOT born in Islam but become Muslims  on the way  in life for one  reason or other   but ..but..

    I wonder why it will offend the believers  and those who preach Islam??

    I am just curious here .,is he by any chance  related to  that Egyptian in Canada   Dr. Jamal Badawi

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1681 - December 07, 2017, 11:52 PM

    IQSA 2017 Annual Meeting – Conference Report: https://iqsaweb.wordpress.com/2017/12/04/iqsa-2017-annual-meeting-conference-report/amp/
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1682 - December 13, 2017, 12:41 PM

    Presentation of the "Arhruf" "Qiraat" issue for mainstream christian public by Jay Smith.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Eftyd3Sifag
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1683 - December 14, 2017, 08:25 PM

    mmmm, interesting Altara, experts, any opinion?
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1684 - December 14, 2017, 10:44 PM

    Gabriel Said Reynolds on Mustafa Akyol’s The Islamic Jesus

    https://www.firstthings.com/article/2018/01/jesus-for-muslims

    Thread: https://mobile.twitter.com/GabrielSaidR/status/941303468786180098

    Read Akyol’s introduction: http://mustafaakyol.org/images/downloads/Intro_IslamicJesus.pdf
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1685 - December 14, 2017, 11:22 PM

    Diego Sarrió Cucarella reviews Daniel Brown’s A New Introduction to Islam

    https://www.academia.edu/35385414/Review_of_Daniel_W._BROWN_A_New_Introduction_to_Islam_2nd_edition_Malden_MA_Wiley-Blackwell_2009_
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1686 - December 14, 2017, 11:38 PM

    Diego Sarrió Cucarella reviews Fred Donner’s Muhammad and the Believers

    https://www.academia.edu/876580/Review_of_Fred_M._DONNER_Muhammad_and_the_Believers_At_the_Origins_of_Islam_Cambridge_MA_and_London_Belknap_Press_of_Harvard_University_Press_2010_

  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1687 - December 14, 2017, 11:44 PM

    Uriel Simonsohn - Conversion, Exemption, and Manipulation: Social Benefits and Conversion to Islam in Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages

    https://www.academia.edu/35309026/_Conversion_Exemption_and_Manipulation_Social_Benefits_and_Conversion_to_Islam_in_Late_Antiquity_and_the_Middle_Ages_Medieval_Worlds_6_2017_196-216
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1688 - December 15, 2017, 12:28 AM

    Thread: https://mobile.twitter.com/IslamicAware/status/941250028194086912
    Quote from: Islamic Awareness
    Update of "Codex Ṣanʿāʾ I – A Qur'ānic Manuscript From Mid–1st Century Of Hijra". High resolution images of the folios from Dār al-Makhṭūtāt, Ṣanʿāʾ, are now available for download. http://www.islamic-awareness.org/Quran/Text/Mss/soth.html

  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1689 - December 15, 2017, 08:33 PM

    Peter Webb - Militant Islam between literature and pre-Islamic history

    http://www.leiden-islamblog.nl/articles/militant-islam-between-literature-and-pre-islamic-history
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1690 - December 22, 2017, 11:40 AM

    Ahmad Al-Jallad - The Word, the Blade, and the Pen: Three Thousand Years of Arabic (book preview)

    http://aljallad.nl/the-word-the-blade-and-the-pen-three-thousand-years-of-arabic-book-preview/
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1691 - December 27, 2017, 09:57 AM

    Guillaume Dye is now on twitter: https://mobile.twitter.com/GuillaumeDye
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1692 - December 27, 2017, 06:42 PM

    Peter Webb - Militant Islam between literature and pre-Islamic history

    http://www.leiden-islamblog.nl/articles/militant-islam-between-literature-and-pre-islamic-history

     Zeca Akhi, I read this blog post earlier today and felt the urge to puke violently.

    Have you any particular take on it?
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1693 - December 27, 2017, 07:01 PM

    I hadn’t really given it much thought - other than that I’d take Peter Webb to be a good guide to interpreting early Arabic literature independent of later religious or academic assumptions. From your reaction I take it you disagree with him. I’d be interested to read your reasons if you feel like giving them.
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1694 - December 27, 2017, 10:10 PM

    The Qurʾān between Judaism and Christianity – videos

    https://www.nottingham.ac.uk/theology/research/quran-lecture-videos-2016.aspx
    Quote
    What can the Qurʾān, the Holy Scripture of Islam, teach us about Judaism and Christianity? How does knowledge about Judaism and Christianity help us to understand the Qurʾān better?

    A better understanding of the past may in turn help us to reconsider the present in a more nuanced way, and to formulate answers to the challenges faced by the Muslim communities in the Western World and beyond.

    This lecture series, which ran over three sessions between September and December 2016, sought to make academic research in Islamic Studies accessible to the broader public. The speakers integrated literary and historical approaches in order to illustrate the intricate relationship between Jews, Christians, and Muslims.

  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1695 - December 28, 2017, 09:13 AM

    The Qurʾān between Judaism and Christianity – videos

    https://www.nottingham.ac.uk/theology/research/quran-lecture-videos-2016.aspx

     That is really INTELLECTUAL MASTURBATION OF ELITES ON  THE HISTORY OF RELIGIONS paid by the taxpayers money  that will not educate the faith heads  and their politics ..

    These so-called department of theologies in the educational institutes  should be renamed as Department of  History of faiths

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1696 - December 28, 2017, 09:46 AM

    Yeez - I haven’t watched any of the videos yet, but the speakers include Gabriel Said Reynolds, Emran El-Badawi, Nicolai Sinai and Holger Zellentin, all academics I’d expect to have something interesting to say. Have you watched any of these? And if you have do you have a critique of them?

  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1697 - December 28, 2017, 11:11 AM

    Very interesting interventions, thank you Zeca. The Sinai one is particularly brilliant.
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1698 - December 30, 2017, 01:09 AM

    the Omar Ali-de-Unzaga as well.
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1699 - January 02, 2018, 09:34 PM

    Ian David Morris - Mecca before Islam: 3) Dabanegoris regio

    http://www.iandavidmorris.com/mecca-before-islam-3-dabanegoris-regio/
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1700 - January 03, 2018, 05:21 PM

    Ian David Morris seems to be a great believer of the traditional account but his work at first glance rather fair, shows rather that Mecca did not exist before Islam, the probability is near zero considering the lack of sources. No Mecca, means no Prophet as they are strongly linked in the traditional account.
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1701 - January 04, 2018, 06:51 PM

    Guillaume Dye - Traces of Bilingualism/Multilingualism in Qur'anic Arabic

    https://www.academia.edu/4730102/Traces_of_Bilingualism_Multilingualism_in_Quranic_Arabic
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1702 - January 09, 2018, 06:37 PM

    Gabriel Said Reynolds - Moses, Son of Pharaoh: A Study of Qurʾān 26 and Its Exegesis

    https://www.academia.edu/35609707/_Moses_Son_of_Pharaoh_A_Study_of_Qurʾān_26_and_Its_Exegesis_Exegetical_Crossroads_ed._Tamer_et_al._2018
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1703 - January 10, 2018, 09:51 AM

    Thread: https://mobile.twitter.com/shahanSean/status/950901948047351809
    Quote from: Sean Anthony
    Very interesting graffito containing a shahādah attr. to a grandson of a Companion of Muhammad from the Zuhrah clan of Quraysh. The Companion (ʿAbdallāh b. al-Mu{ṭṭalib al-Zuhrī) was reputedly born while in Ethiopia; his parents fled from the persecution of the pagan Quraysh.

  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1704 - January 10, 2018, 09:15 PM

    Thread: https://mobile.twitter.com/phoenixnl/status/949808129507823616
    Quote from: Marijn van Putten
    ....
    Classical Arabic looks very archaic, and for a long time scholars have assumed that the Pre-Islamic Arabic was identical or very close to Classical Arabic and that all dialects must have developed from this.

    As more information about dialects has become available this has become untenable. Razihit, a tiny dialect spoken in northern Yemen is clearly Arabic, but retains several archaisms that were lost in Classical Arabic. Classical Arabic cannot possibly be its ancestor.
    ....
    Another reason why Classical Arabic was considered the ancestor of the modern varieties, was that there was little evidence for a linguistically diverse Pre-Islamic Arabic. In recent years this has changed drastically, in a large part due to good friend Ahmad Al-Jallad.

    He has shown that the Safaitic inscriptions of (primarily) Jordan, as well as inscriptions from the Nabataean kingdom are clearly closely akin to other varieties of Arabic, but also very different from Classical Arabic. His timeline is a great introduction http://aljallad.nl/the-word-the-blade-and-the-pen-three-thousand-years-of-arabic-book-preview/

    All our previous 'givens' about the history of Arabic are now up in the air. We don't know yet how modern dialects relate to the pre-Islamic varieties, but sometimes we can connect dots between them (e.g. Tihāmi and Quranic Arabic share a feature that Classical Ar doesn't have)

    The past two years I have focused to show that paying close attention to the rhyme and spelling of the Quranic text, it is clear that Quranic Arabic is not Classical Arabic at all. This was previously unthinkable, but now with new epigraphic evidence we can connect the dots.
    ...

  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1705 - January 11, 2018, 03:15 AM



    I'm born in Ethiopia as well   Cheesy I'd like to know how Sean explain that none Ethiopian sources are there to validate the "persecution" of "Meccan" people  by the "Quraysh" affirmed by the traditional account. None sources are there to validate the affirmation  by the traditional account of existence of Mecca, Medina, the Ka'ba, Zem Zem, etc. How Sean explain this ?  Yawn.
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1706 - January 11, 2018, 04:05 AM

    Quote

    I'm born in Ethiopia as well   Cheesy I'd like to know how Sean explain that none Ethiopian sources are there to validate the "persecution" of "Meccan" people  by the "Quraysh" affirmed by the traditional account. None sources are there to validate the affirmation  by the traditional account of existence of Mecca, Medina, the Ka'ba, Zem Zem, etc. How Sean explain this ?  Yawn.



    Sean story source  on that  comes from this picture



    and that image comes from

    https://mobile.twitter.com/mohammed93athar/status/950836428363231238

    and  from  here  https://mobile.twitter.com/hashtag/%D9%86%D9%82%D9%88%D8%B4_%D8%A5%D8%B3%D9%84%D8%A7%D9%85%D9%8A%D8%A9?src=hashtag_click

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DTIMmtuX4AAlC_K?format=jpg&name=small

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DTIMpdRXUAUyatV?format=jpg&name=small

    this   he said,   i say ..  you say is a serious problem  in Islamic history ..  nonsense over nonsense...


    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1707 - January 11, 2018, 05:57 AM

    It’s always struck me as super dubious, and makes little sense on its face. If the pagan Quraysh were oppressing you, why not go to Najran? Or Syria? Why pack up, somehow go across the sea, and live in Ethiopia, where you don’t even know the language? The punitive reach of the Quraysh—their alleged hostility to polytheism—was comparatively negligible in Arabic speaking lands, and for members of the Quraysh to flee to Ethiopia would be a pointlessly theatrical and ineffective solution to a relatively limited problem (compare Muhammad fleeing to Yathrib, which at least makes basic geographical sense). The fact that these events are dated so early in the prophetic biography makes them particularly hard to take seriously as more than creative storytelling.
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1708 - January 11, 2018, 04:36 PM

    It’s always struck me as super dubious, and makes little sense on its face. If the pagan Quraysh...................

    Those academic scholars ((paid by the tax payers money  and write nonsense history sitting in universities)).....  should first read Quran and hadith  and explore  their  connection  to   that early migration of  so-called sahaba to Abyssinia,

    anyways  let me add  the usual story in its entirety that we hear from ISLAMIC  INTELLECTUALS on  this  so-called  First Hijrah /migration   in Islam  to  the present Eritrea-Ethiopia  region

    Quote
    The Two Migrations of Muslims to Abyssinia (A.D. 615-616)

    Muhammad Mustafa (may God bless him and his Ahlul-Bait), shared all the sorrows and afflictions of his followers who were being persecuted for believing that “God is One”, but he had no means to protect them. When the violence of the polytheists against the Muslims didn't show any sign of de-escalating, he suggested to them to leave Makkah and to seek sanctuary in Abyssinia (Ethiopia) which was then ruled by a Christian king, well-known for being a just and God-fearing man.

    Following this suggestion, a group of Muslims, comprising eleven men and four women, left Makkah and went to Abyssinia. The group included Uthman bin Affan, a future khalifa of the Muslims; his wife, Ruqayya; and Zubayr bin al-Awwam, a cousin of the Prophet. The Prophet appointed Uthman bin Mazoon, one of his principal companions, as the leader of this group.

    Ibn Ishaq

    When the Apostle saw the afflictions of his companions and that though he escaped it because of his standing with Allah and his uncle, Abu Talib, he could not protect them, he said to them: ‘If you were to go to Abyssinia (it would be better for you), for the king (there) will not tolerate injustice and it is a friendly country, until such time as Allah shall relieve you from your distress.'

    Thereupon his companions went to Abyssinia, being afraid of apostasy and fleeing to God with their religion. This was the first hijra in Islam. (The Life of the Messenger of God)

    The first migration took place in the fifth year of the Proclamation – in A.D. 615.

    The king of Abyssinia welcomed the Muslim refugees from Makkah into his kingdom. He gave them sanctuary, and they enjoyed peace, security and freedom of worship under his aegis. About a year later, the Muslims in Abyssinia heard rumors that the Quraysh in Makkah had accepted Islam.

    If it was true then there was no reason for them to live in exile. They were homesick, and they decided to return to Makkah. But when they arrived in Makkah, they found out that not only the rumors they had heard were false, but also that the Quraysh had stepped up the persecution of the Muslims.

    They, therefore, left Makkah once again. Many other Muslims also accompanied them. This new group comprised 83 men and 18 women. Muhammad Mustafa appointed his first cousin, Jaafer ibn Abi Talib, an elder brother of Ali, as the leader of this group.

    This second migration of the Muslims to Abyssinia took place in the sixth year of the Proclamation, which corresponds to the year A.D. 616.

    The migration of the Muslims to Abyssinia, and their reception at the friendly court of that country, alarmed the Quraysh. They entertained the fear that Muslims might grow in strength, or find new allies, and then, some day, might return to Makkah to challenge them. To head off this potential threat, such as they saw it, they decided to send an embassy to the court of the king of Abyssinia to try to persuade him to extradite the Muslims to Makkah.

    The Muslim refugees who had expected to be left in peace, were surprised by the arrival, in the Abyssinian capital, of an embassy from Makkah, led by a certain Amr bin Aas. Amr had brought rich presents for the king and his courtiers to ingratiate himself with them.

    When the king gave audience to the emissary of the Quraysh, he said that the Muslims in Abyssinia were not refugees from persecution but were fugitives from justice and law, and requested him to extradite them to Makkah. The king, however, wanted to hear the other side of the story also before giving any judgment, and summoned Jaafer ibn Abi Talib to the court to answer the charges against the Muslims.

    Jaafer made a most memorable defense. Following is a summary of his speech in the court of Abyssinia in answer to the questions posed by the Christian king.

    “O King! We were ignorant people and we lived like wild animals. The strong among us lived by preying upon the weak. We obeyed no law and we acknowledged no authority save that of brute force. We worshipped idols made of stone or wood, and we knew nothing of human dignity. And then God, in His Mercy, sent to us His Messenger who was himself one of us.

    We knew about his truthfulness and his integrity. His character was exemplary, and he was the most well-born of the Arabs. He invited us toward the worship of One God, and he forbade us to worship idols. He exhorted us to tell the truth, and to protect the weak, the poor, the humble, the widows and the orphans. He ordered us to show respect to women, and never to slander them. We obeyed him and followed his teachings.

    Most of the people in our country are still polytheists, and they resented our conversion to the new faith which is called Islam. They began to persecute us and it was in order to escape from persecution by them that we sought and found sanctuary in your kingdom.”

    When Jaaffer concluded his speech, the king asked him to read some verses which were revealed to the Prophet of the Muslims. Jaafer read a few verses from Surah Maryam (Mary), the 19th chapter of Al-Qur’an al-Majid. When the king heard these verses, he said that their fountainhead was the same as that of the verses of the Evangel. He then declared that he was convinced of his veracity, and added, to the great chagrin of Amr bin Aas, that the Muslims were free to live in his kingdom for as long as they wished.

    But Amr bin Aas bethought himself of a new stratagem, which, he felt confident, would tilt the scales against Jaafer. On the following day, therefore, he returned to the court and said to the king that he (the king) ought to waive his protection of the Muslims because they rejected the divine nature of Christ, and claimed that he was a mortal like other men.

    When questioned on this point by the king, Jaafer said: “Our judgment of Jesus is the same as that of Allah and His Messenger, viz., Jesus is God's servant, His Prophet, His Spirit, and His command given unto Mary, the innocent virgin.”

    The king said: “Jesus is just what you have stated him to be, and is nothing more than that.” Then addressing the Muslims, he said: “Go to your homes and live in peace. I shall never give you up to your enemies.” He refused to extradite the Muslims, returned the presents which Amr bin Aas had brought, and dismissed his embassy.

    Washington Irving

    Among the refugees to Abyssinia, there was Jaafer, the son of Abu Talib, and brother of Ali, consequently the cousin of Mohammed. He was a man of persuasive eloquence and a most prepossessing appearance. He stood forth before the king of Abyssinia, and expounded the doctrines of Islam with zeal and power.

    The king who was a Nestorian Christian, found these doctrines so similar in many respects to those of his sect and so opposed to the gross idolatry of the Koreishites, that so far from giving up the fugitives, he took them more especially into favor and protection, and returning to Amr b. Aas and Abdullah, the presents they had brought, dismissed them from his court. (Life of Mohammed)

    Muslims spent many years in Abyssinia and lived there in peace. Thirteen years later – in 7 A.H. (A.D. 628) – they returned, not to Makkah but to Medina. Their arrival synchronized with the conquest of Khyber by the Muslims.

    Jaafer ibn Abi Talib was the leader of all those Muslims who had migrated to Abyssinia in 615 and 616. He appears to have been the only member of the clan of Banu Hashim to leave for Abyssinia with the other refugees. All other members of Banu Hashim stayed in Makkah.

    Montgomery Watt

    Apart from two exceptions all the early Muslims who remained in Mecca (and did not go to Abyssinia) belonged to a group of five clans, headed by Mohammed's clan of Hashim. This group seems to be a reconstituted form of the League of the Virtuous. It is thus the focus of the opposition to the leading merchants with their monopolistic practices. (Mohammed, Prophet and Statesman, 1961)

      
    That is  one of  the well known soap operas of  Islamic history Muslim children  learn in Islam .. But this  discussion  of first migration  of  early converts to Islam  needs its own folder  and  is a  very small story of Islam exaggerated/told /written millions of times to brain wash and impress   children  as well  as  NEW CONVERTS who also   have a brain of  a child

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1709 - January 11, 2018, 08:30 PM

    The more surprising being that Western scholars take for granted as "historical events" events whose they have not one piece of source to validate the veracity.
  • Previous page 1 ... 55 56 5758 59 Next page « Previous thread | Next thread »