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Theme Changer

 Topic: Qur'anic studies today

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  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #630 - December 21, 2015, 12:33 AM

    A new article from Segovia

    Carlos Segovia - The Jews and Christians of pre-Islamic Yemen (Ḥimyar) and the Elusive Matrix of the Qur’ān's Christology

    https://www.academia.edu/14840043/The_Jews_and_Christians_of_pre-Islamic_Yemen_Ḥimyar_and_the_Elusive_Matrix_of_the_Qur_āns_Christology_2015_Awarded_Conference_Paper_-_Upcoming_Book_Chapter
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #631 - December 21, 2015, 12:50 AM

    A long article from Guillaume Dye in French

    Guillaume Dye - Pourquoi et comment se fait un texte canonique? Quelques réflexions sur l’histoire du Coran

    https://dipot.ulb.ac.be/dspace/bitstream/2013/208040/3/HERESIES_DYE.pdf
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #632 - December 21, 2015, 01:01 AM

    A new article by Guillaume Dye, presented at the same conference as the Segovia article

    Guillaume Dye - Jewish Christianity, the Qur’ān, and Early Islam: some methodological caveats

    https://www.academia.edu/16774708/Jewish_Christianity_the_Qur_ān_and_Early_Islam_some_methodological_caveats
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #633 - December 21, 2015, 01:20 AM

    There should also be papers from that conference by Shoemaker, Hoyland and Zellentin but they don't seem to have been published yet.
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #634 - December 21, 2015, 09:14 PM

    Part 2 of the Mizan Project forum on conflict and convergence in late antiquity

    http://www.mizanproject.org/forum-conflict-and-convergence-in-late-antiquity-part-2/
    Quote from: Michael Pregill
    This is the second part of our forum on “Conflict and Convergence in Late Antiquity,” dedicated to exploration of the intersections of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam reflected in the Qur’an, understandings of the career of Muhammad, and the formation of Muslim identity, community, and tradition.

    The title of this forum was selected deliberately. Islam was born out of the imperial struggles of Late Antiquity, a period during which claims of political authority were commonly intertwined with assertions of religious truth. Islam was unusual in this period in that it recognized the partial authenticity of the Jewish and Christian messages while asserting its superiority as the final revelation to humanity, as well as establishing a world empire aiming to restore God’s rule on earth. The narrative of Muhammad’s Night Journey and Ascension (the Isrāʾ and Miʿrāj) epitomizes the tension between Islam’s acknowledgment of its continuity and compatibility with Judaism and Christianity and its supersessionist appropriation of the symbols and traditions of its predecessors. Muhammad miraculously travels to Jerusalem, where he meets the Israelite prophets; they not only recognize him and welcome him into their fellowship, but acknowledge him as their leader. Formative Islam thus embraces Jews and Christians as fellow members of a family of religions tracing their lineage back to ancient Israel – the  “People of the Book” – yet tacitly positions itself as superior, the culmination and perfection of what went before.

    Like the seven scholars who contributed to the first part of the forum, the five scholars whose work is represented here all explore the complex social, political, and religious factors that inform the intersections of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam in this period. Their subject matter ranges from the coevolution of Bible and Qur’an as intertwined genres to Muslim historians’ understanding of Islam’s origins to Jewish narratives of the influence of “Jewish Muslims” on the Qur’an. Read together, both parts of our forum demonstrate the breadth, sophistication, and diversity of contemporary scholarly approaches to the rise of Islam in the late antique milieu.

    The first part of this collaborative forum may be found here.


    Ulrika Mårtensson - The meaning of the Abrahamic election  according to some classical Muslim authors

    John Reeves - Con-‘text’-ualizing Bible in/and/with Qur’an

    Mehdy Shaddel - Food, identity and ‘third-way’ groups in late antiquity and at the origins of the Qur’an

    Stephen Shoemaker - Biblical criticism and the Qur’an: the hour has drawn nigh

    Liran Yadgar - Jewish accounts of Muhammad and his apostate informants
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #635 - December 26, 2015, 04:33 PM

    Ian David Morris on Islam as a post-conquest identity: https://mobile.twitter.com/iandavidmorris/status/680743070787305472
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #636 - December 27, 2015, 06:05 PM

    Ilkka Lindstedt - “New Interpretations of the Origins of Islam.” A combined review of: Maʿmar ibn Rāshid, The Expeditions: An Early Biography of Muḥammad, ed. and transl. Sean W. Anthony & David S. Powers, Zayd: The Little-Known Story of Muḥammad’s Adopted Son

    https://www.academia.edu/15465975/_New_Interpretations_of_the_Origins_of_Islam._A_combined_review_of_Maʿmar_ibn_Rāshid_The_Expeditions_An_Early_Biography_of_Muḥammad_ed._and_transl._Sean_W._Anthony_and_David_S._Powers_Zayd_The_Little-Known_Story_of_Muḥammad_s_Adopted_Son
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #637 - December 27, 2015, 06:48 PM

    Aaron Hughes - Review of The Religious and Spiritual Life of the Jews of Medina by Haggai Mazuz

    https://www.academia.edu/11957727/_Review_of_The_Religious_and_Spiritual_Life_of_the_Jews_of_Medina_by_Haggai_Mazuz_
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #638 - December 27, 2015, 07:47 PM

    Tommaso Tesei - The barzakh and the Intermediate State of the Dead in the Quran

    https://www.academia.edu/16294259/T._Tesei._The_barzakh_and_the_Intermediate_State_of_the_Dead_in_the_Quran_in_C._Lange_ed._Locating_Hell_in_Islamic_Traditions._Leiden_Brill_2015_29-55._Open_access_http_booksandjournals.brillonline.com_content_books_9789004301368_
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #639 - December 27, 2015, 07:57 PM

    Chase Robinson - History and Heilsgeschichte in early Islam: Some observations on prophetic history and biography

    http://chaserobinson.net/files/2014/03/HeilgeschichteMarch2014.pdf
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #640 - December 31, 2015, 04:43 PM

    Stephen Shoemaker - In Search of ʿUrwa’s Sīra: Some Methodological Issues in the Quest for "Authenticity" in the Life of Muḥammad

    https://www.academia.edu/1057322/In_Search_of_ʿUrwa_s_Sīra_Some_Methodological_Issues_in_the_Quest_for_Authenticity_in_the_Life_of_Muḥammad
    Quote
    This article raises important critical questions about efforts to reconstruct the “sīra” of ʽUrwa ibn al-Zubayr using the methods of isnād criticism, particularly as recently proposed by Gregor Schoeler and Andreas Görke. While al-Zuhrī and occasionally other authorities of his generation can often be persuasively linked with the traditions in question, the reach back to ʽUrwa is generally not convincing (and even less so, the occasional invocation of ʽĀ'isha and claims of “authenticity”). The primary difficulty is that the data of the biographical traditions generally cannot meet the demanding requirements of common-link analysis: their networks of transmission usually are not dense enough to establish sufficiently meaningful patterns beyond the early second century. Moreover, the arguments for ʽUrwa's authorship often require a great deal of optimism regarding the accuracy of certain isnāds and an occasional willingness to accept hypothetically reconstructed lines of transmission or to overlook difficulties in the recorded patterns of transmission. Equally significant is the failure so far of this arduous method to reveal anything particularly “new” about the “historical Muḥammad” that could not otherwise be determined using simpler approaches.


    Andreas Görke, Harald Motzki, Gregor Schoeler - First Century Sources for the Life of Muhammad? A Debate

    http://www.research.ed.ac.uk/portal/files/12692843/First_Century_Sources_for_the_Life_of_Muhammad_a_debate.pdf
    Quote
    Abstract: In a recent issue of Der Islam, Stephen R. Shoemaker has contributed an extensive article in which he challenged the processes and findings of a number of studies conducted by Gregor Schoeler, Harald Motzki, and Andreas Görke.1 The following article offers a response to his findings. Whereas the three authors argued the case for the possibility that authentic traditions of the first century of the Hijra can be reconstructed, Shoemaker holds the contrary point of view, as already stated in the abstract of his study: “While az-Zuhr\ and occasion- ally other authorities of his generation can often be persuasively linked with the tradition in question, the reach back to ^Urwa is generally not convincing ...” Yet he is not entirely consistent in his views. In his study several statements are to be found that in fact support the views of the authors whose studies he critically examines. Overall, Shoemaker makes more concessions towards the possible authenticity of some of the material traced back to the first century than any “sceptic” prior to him. Unfortunately, Shoemaker’s criticism and rendering of the three authors’ studies is fraught with misunderstandings and inconsistencies. They are the focus of attention in this critical review. In addition, hitherto unknown traditions as well as sources that Shoemaker mentions without quoting or paraphrasing them will be presented. This material also challenges a number of Shoemaker’s key conclusions.


    (link from here: https://mobile.twitter.com/iandavidmorris/status/682576038103281664)
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #641 - December 31, 2015, 06:12 PM

    Updated version of Klingschor article - Identifying the Quranic Milieu ("Where Was the Koran Written?")

    http://research-islam.blogspot.com.au/2015/01/the-quranic-milieu-where-was-koran.html
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #642 - January 01, 2016, 08:44 PM

    "Sahih International shouldn’t slip words into the translation like this...."

    "I do wonder whether the legends about Gabriel’s role in Muhammad’s revelation are partly inspired by a reappropriation of this verse."

    https://mobile.twitter.com/iandavidmorris/status/682941761480712192

    "Quick thread (I hope) explaining why I think the qur’anic Night Journey (Isrā’) referred originally to Moses’ flight from Egypt. "

    https://mobile.twitter.com/iandavidmorris/status/682949124208095232
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #643 - January 03, 2016, 04:21 AM

    That's the subject of my recent article      whistling2

    https://www.academia.edu/17318352/Mu%E1%B8%A5ammad_s_Night_Journey_in_its_Palestinian_Context_a_Perfect_Solution_to_a_Forgotten_Problem_Q_17_1_

    Morris is certainly correct that Q 17:1 *originally* referred to the exodus of Moses --- but the far more interesting and complex question is why the verse was later interpolated to assert the journey to 'masjid al aqsa'!
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #644 - January 03, 2016, 06:52 PM

    Uri Rubin - ‘Become you apes, repelled!’ (Quran 7:166): The transformation of the Israelites into apes and its biblical and midrashic background

    https://www.academia.edu/11529528/_Become_you_apes_repelled_Quran_7_166_The_transformation_of_the_Israelites_into_apes_and_its_biblical_and_midrashic_background._

    Other articles by Uri Rubin

    https://telaviv.academia.edu/UriRubin


    Does anyone have any opinions on Rubin's scholarship?

  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #645 - January 03, 2016, 09:23 PM

    Rubin is an impeccable traditionalist scholar ... one of the last of the Orientalist old guard.  His analysis pushes up against the limits of the older paradigms that interpret the Qur'an within the confines of the traditional prophetic biography.

    Very much worth reading, but behind the times from a methodological perspective.

    You can see that I cite him fairly extensively in the Surat al Isra article above, but then proceed to apply a more modern analytical approach.
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #646 - January 03, 2016, 09:25 PM

    Thanks Zaotar.
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #647 - January 10, 2016, 05:16 PM

    Quote from: Ian David Morris
    Thanks to @Klingschor, I read a fun article on the origins of Sunnism last night. Shall we have a look?

    Let’s read Matthew J. Kuiper (Notre Dame), “The Roots and Achievements of the Early Proto-Sunni Movement: A Profile and Interpretation”...

    https://mobile.twitter.com/iandavidmorris/status/686211960661241860
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #648 - January 16, 2016, 12:44 AM

    Forthcoming book

    Peter Webb - Imagining the Arabs: Arab Identity and the Rise of Islam

    http://www.euppublishing.com/book/9781474408264
    Quote
    A new interpretation of Arab origins and the historical roots of Arab identity

    Who are the Arabs? When did people begin calling themselves Arabs? And what was the Arabs’ role in the rise of Islam? Investigating these core questions about Arab identity and history through close interpretation of pre-Islamic evidence and the extensive Arabic literary corpus in tandem with theories of identity and ethnicity prompts new answers to the riddle of Arab origins and fundamental reinterpretations of early Islamic history.

    It is revealed that the time-honoured stereotypes depicting Arabs as ancient Arabian Bedouin are entirely misleading: the essence of Arab identity was in fact devised by Muslims during the first centuries of Islam. Arab identity emerged and evolved as groups imagined new notions of community to suit the radically changing circumstances of life in the early Caliphate. The idea of ‘the Arab’ was a device used by Muslims to articulate their communal identity, to negotiate post-Conquest power relations, and to explain the rise of Islam. Over Islam’s first four centuries, political elites, genealogists, poetry collectors, historians and grammarians all participated in a vibrant process of imagining and re-imagining Arab identity and history, and the sum of their works established a powerful tradition that influences Middle Eastern communities to the present day.

    Key features

    The first sustained analysis of Arab identity through the stages of its formation and maintenance in early Islam

    Draws upon the full array of available Arabic language sources to illustrate Arab ethnogenesis – poetry, Qur’an, hadith, akhb?r history, chronicles, adab, exegesis and grammatical texts

    Contents

    Acknowledgements; Note on the Text; Introduction; Part 1: The Rise of Arab Communities; 1. The Rise of Arab Communities; I. Arabs and pre-Islamic Textual Traditions; II. Arabs in Arabia: ethnogenesis, interpretations and problems; III. An Arabness pretence: pre-Islamic ‘Arab’-cognates reconsidered; 2. Pre-Islamic ‘Arabless-ness’: Arabian Identities; I. The Arabic Language: a signpost to Arabness?; II. The search for Arabs in pre-Islamic poetry; III. Contextualising the ‘Arabless’ Poetry: ethnic boundaries in pre-Islamic Arabia; IV. The rise of ‘Arab’ poetry; V. Transition from ‘Ma?add’ to ‘Arab’: case study of Dh? Q?r; VI. Pre-Islamic Arabian identity: conclusions; 3. Arabness from the Qur’an to an ethnos; I. ‘Arab’: an ethnonym resurrected?; II. The Qur’an and Arabness; III. Early Islam and the genesis of Arab identity; Part Two: The Changing Faces of Arabness in Early Islam; 4. Interpreting Arabs: defining their name and constructing their family; I. ‘Arab’ defined; II. Arabness and contested lineage; III. Arab genealogy reconsidered: kinship, gender and identity; IV. The creation of ‘traditional’ Arab genealogy; V. Defining Arabs: conclusions; 5. Arabs as a people and Arabness as an idea: 750-900 CE; I. Arabs in the early Abbasid Caliphate (132-193/750-809); II. Forging an Iraqi ‘Arab Past’; III. al-J?hiliyya and imagining pre-Islamic Arabs; IV. Arabs and Arabia: changing relationships in the third/ninth century; 6. Philologists, ‘Bedouinisation’ and the ‘Archetypal Arab’ after the mid-third/ninth century; I. Philologists and Arabness: changing conceptions of Arabic between the late second/eighth and fourth/tenth centuries; II. The transformation of Arabness into Bedouin-ness; III. Bedouin Arabness and the emergence of a J?hiliyya archetype; IV. Conclusions; Imagining and Reimagining the Arabs: Conclusions; Bibliography.

  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #649 - January 16, 2016, 04:50 PM

    Forthcoming book

    The Qur’an Seminar Commentary: A Collaborative Study of 50 Qur’anic Passages by Azaiez Mehdi, Reynolds Gabriel S., Tesei Tommaso, Zafer M. Hamza -eds- (June 2016)

    http://www.mehdi-azaiez.org/The-Qur-an-Seminar-Commentary-Le-Qur-an-Seminar-A-Collaborative-Study-of-50-Qur?lang=en
    Quote
    The Qurʾan Seminar Commentary is an unprecedented work of collaboration in the field of Qurʾanic Studies, involving the insights of 27 different scholars on 50 different Qurʾanic passages. These scholars represent a diverse range disciplinary backgrounds (Arabic language, comparative Semitic linguistics, paleography, epigraphy, history, rhetorical theory, hermeneutics, and Biblical studies) and provide readers with unique insight into the latest trends of research in the Qurʾan. The Qurʾan Seminar Commentary will be a useful and illuminating reference work for students and scholars alike in the field of Qurʾanic Studies.

    The starting point of this work was a series of five international conferences on the Qurʾan at the University of Notre Dame over the academic year 2012-13, although the commentaries contributed during those conferences have been carefully edited to avoid repetition. Readers of The Qurʾan Seminar commentary will find that the 50 passages selected for inclusion in this work include many of the most important and influential elements of the Qurʾan, including...

  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #650 - January 16, 2016, 05:07 PM

    Ian David Morris - Ali as Muhammad's brother? https://mobile.twitter.com/iandavidmorris/status/688325977529806849
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #651 - January 17, 2016, 12:16 AM

    Jeremy Johns - The "House of the Prophet" and the Concept of the Mosque

    https://www.academia.edu/6014749/The_House_of_the_Prophet_and_the_Concept_of_the_Mosque

    Ian David Morris comments: https://mobile.twitter.com/iandavidmorris/status/688433968451055616
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #652 - January 17, 2016, 02:16 AM

    from the tweet - Johns: Muhammad, asked why he didn’t give his mosque a permanent roof: "The end of the world is coming too soon for that"
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #653 - January 20, 2016, 03:29 PM

    Klingschor - The Legacy of "Hagarism" (Crone & Cook)

    http://research-islam.blogspot.com.au/2016/01/the-legacy-of-hagarism-crone-cook.html

    Ian David Morris comments: https://mobile.twitter.com/iandavidmorris/status/689808046231547904
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #654 - January 21, 2016, 02:43 PM

    Quote from: Ian David Morris
    Who wants to hear about the first ever mosque built on the Temple Mount—forerunner to al-Aqṣā?

    https://mobile.twitter.com/iandavidmorris/status/690170460768706561
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #655 - January 21, 2016, 05:43 PM

    I'd disagree with Morris on two points when he says that reference is the earliest use of the Arabic word "masjid," meaning mosque.  First it was used in the Qur'an prior to that time (unless you accept a very late composition approach).  Second, masjid was used in Aramaic, and Nabatean in particular, to designate a place of worship, and however you want to describe the interaction between Arabic and Aramaic, the Nabatean language massively intermeshed with Arabic, to the point where late Nabatean inscriptions are often termed Arabo-Aramaic.  Also, it was used in epigraphic South Arabian, i.e. as ms'gd (although here the underlying substratum wouldn't have been Arabic).  See Jeffery on masjid as a borrowing from the North.

    If it was used in the quasi-Aramaic inscriptions of the Arabic-speaking Nabateans, it was effectively part of the (Northern!) Arabic linguistic milieu, which did not rigidly isolate Aramaic and Arabic terms.  In the later Nabatean era, the Nabatean inscriptions are essentially true Arabic (setting aside what that means), heavily interlaced with (orthographic, semantic, etc.) Aramaicisms.  As such, the 'masjid' had centuries of pre-Islamic existence in the Aramaicized Arabic of the Nabatean region.  There was no rigid separation between written Aramaic and spoken Arabic.  It is, to my mind, useless to think of the steady importation of Aramaic religious lexicon/semantics/orthographic influence into Arabic as if such terms were only used as "foreign language" that at some point suddenly, like a light switch, became "Arabic language."

    As such, I'd agree with the traditional Islamic view that 'mosques' long predated Muhammad, both in Jerusalem and elsewhere.  While the linguistic usage and its architectural counterparts obviously evolved creatively and were heavily transformed during the early Islamic era and beyond, they didn't spring from nothing (as the Qur'an itself, of course, evidences)!
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #656 - January 22, 2016, 12:04 AM

    Irene Schneider - Freedom and slavery in early Islamic time

    http://al-qantara.revistas.csic.es/index.php/al-qantara/article/download/41/35
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #657 - January 26, 2016, 10:16 PM

    Patricia Crone - Two legal problems bearing on the early history of the Qur'an

    http://tinyurl.com/jboxqs9
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #658 - January 30, 2016, 05:24 PM

    Ian David Morris - The Temple Mount Mosque in an early Georgian source

    http://www.iandavidmorris.com/the-temple-mount-mosque-in-an-early-georgian-source/

    Quote from: Zaotar
    I'd disagree with Morris on two points when he says that reference is the earliest use of the Arabic word "masjid," meaning mosque.  First it was used in the Qur'an prior to that time (unless you accept a very late composition approach).  Second, masjid was used in Aramaic, and Nabatean in particular, to designate a place of worship, and however you want to describe the interaction between Arabic and Aramaic, the Nabatean language massively intermeshed with Arabic, to the point where late Nabatean inscriptions are often termed Arabo-Aramaic.  Also, it was used in epigraphic South Arabian, i.e. as ms'gd (although here the underlying substratum wouldn't have been Arabic).  See Jeffery on masjid as a borrowing from the North.

    Quote from: Ian David Morris
    The word for ‘mosque’ in this source is mizdgitha, which is certainly a Georgian rendering of the Arabic word masjid. This may be the earliest known reference to the Arabic word masjid for a house of prayer. (Please message me if you know of others.)

    An opportunity to comment there...
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #659 - January 31, 2016, 12:51 PM

    More about elephants

    Quote from: Ian David Morris
    I’m wondering whether the early conquest-era rulers kept menageries, and whether anyone has written about this.

    https://mobile.twitter.com/iandavidmorris/status/693577078474723328

    Quote from: Ian David Morris
    Anyone know of a reassessment of Q. 105 that steps outside the Abraha narratives? @GabrielSaidR @MehdiAzaiez

    https://mobile.twitter.com/iandavidmorris/status/693712923148050433

    Edit: also https://mobile.twitter.com/iandavidmorris/status/695295411058302977
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