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 Topic: Qur'anic studies today

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  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #9990 - March 08, 2021, 12:46 AM

    Exhausted armies :  even if the Heraclius case is less than the following (Alexander), it should be noted that there is not only war, but the Justinian  plague and the continuity of the climate catastrophe of the middle 6th c. which are at the origin of the "apocalyptic" trend in the literature (including the Quran). One have the example of the army of Alexander who complaints to go home after 10 years of fight and he is obliged to obey whereas he is in India and want to continue.
    If Heraclius had stayed in Jerusalem with a relatively fresh army after 628, he could have prevent the Arab take over, at least  delaying it.  He did not stay.
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #9991 - March 08, 2021, 06:42 AM

    Exhausted army:

    Economically we dont see a declinef irst half 7th C. The plague was from 6th C.

    The comparison with Alexander doesnt hold imo. India truly was foreign to him and his soldiers.  This was absolutely not the case for Heraclius in Egypt and Palestine/Syria.

    Maybe there is more of a cultural collaps. Heraclius did indeed not stay in Jerusalem and clearly did not find enough locals to join his army to defend it (not in Jerusalem, not in Egypt). Maybe Heraclius didnt even look for the support? Was happy in Constantinople?

    Can a comparison be seen with the 20th C collaps of the colonial world? In less than 20 years the tables were turned.
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #9992 - March 08, 2021, 09:27 AM

    https://twitter.com/bdaiwi_historia/status/1368186689051561985
    Quote
    Inscription probably dating back to first century hijri (between 620-720 AD) bearing name of Zayd b. Thabit, companion of the Prophet Muhammad. It’s remarkable how far we’ve come in terms of access to early materials. These inscriptions need to be published and studied soon.


    Thread: https://twitter.com/shahanSean/status/1367985753393860608
    Quote
    An inscription bearing the name of the Prophet Muḥammad's companion, Zayd ibn Thābit al-Anṣārī, the renowned scribe who recorded the Qurʾan codex of the caliph ʿUthmān ibn ʿAffān, the archetype for all copies thereof. Here's a translation:
    1] God, pardon Zayd, son of Thābit
    2] and whosever reads this writing
    3] and then says, “Amen”. Amen! Lord of the aeons!
    4] Lord of Moses and Aaron!
    5] In the name of God, the Merciful, the Compassionate
    6] God, listen and answer [my prayer]
    7] For you are the one who hears all, sees all

  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #9993 - March 08, 2021, 10:37 AM

    Exhausted army:

    Economically we dont see a declinef irst half 7th C. The plague was from 6th C.

    Academia is your friend about the plague and the rest.

    Quote
    The comparison with Alexander doesnt hold imo. India truly was foreign to him and his soldiers.  This was absolutely not the case for Heraclius in Egypt and Palestine/Syria.

    Exhausting have nothing to see with a "foreign" thing, it has to see with to be exhausted. But you add one more point to my point : Orient was not known at all by the (young) army  of Heraclius. Constantinople was absent of Palestine-Syria  since 602. Academia is your friend


  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #9994 - March 08, 2021, 10:39 AM

    Quote
    An inscription bearing the name of the Prophet Muḥammad's companion, Zayd


    No date.
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #9995 - March 08, 2021, 12:00 PM

    Quote
    Constantinople was absent of Palestine-Syria  since 602. Academia is your friend



    What you are saying is  Constantinople had lost the Levant already for 20 years and only reconquered it in name in 622 and de facto (but not really) with the entrance of Heraclius in 628.

    I'll have to look op why "they lost it"f rom 602 to 614, but I see sense in what you say. And it seems there was no real motivation to hold the Levant (and Egypt a bit later) firmly in 628. But the exhaustion argument simply does not fit. There was rather a disinterest. My question is why?
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #9996 - March 08, 2021, 12:56 PM

    1/ That's correct.
    2/Exhaustion of  the plague, the climate and a 30 years war,  I think it's enough.
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #9997 - March 08, 2021, 01:52 PM

    Altara,

    Exhaustion:
    -plague was there for everyone,
    -war was not total, it did not destroy the while empire (no comparison with WW destruction of Europe)
    -climate: Negev towns show no decline in agricultural production 7th C. Is the nefarious influence of climate change proven?
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #9998 - March 08, 2021, 02:12 PM

    1/ "-plague was there for everyone," 1/ Did I say the contrary? 2/ the topic is specific here: the armies.
    2/ War was exhausting for the army: I start over: Exhaustion of  the plague, the climate catastrophe and a 30 years war (which does not mean necessarily destruction): Academia is your friend.
    3/Climate : Ann Gibbons “Why 536 was ‘the worst year to be alive’” https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2018/11/why-536-was-worst-year-be-alive
    Timothy P. Newfield, “The Climate Downturn of 536–50”, in The Palgrave Handbook of Climate History, Sam White, Christian Pfister, Franz Mauelshagen (eds.), Palgrave & Macmillan, 2018, p.447-493
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #9999 - March 08, 2021, 02:28 PM

    536:

    That is 100 years later, really no explanation for what happened in 628.
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10000 - March 08, 2021, 02:48 PM

    Without doubt.
    But sufficiently, yet,  for the literature of the 6 and 7 c. be full of apocalyptic stuff. And for me it's enough to explain why Heraclius one time the Cross back in Jerusalem from Ctesiphon went back to Constantinople after a 30 years war having not see the Arab peril.
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10001 - March 08, 2021, 03:25 PM

    Altara,

    You say Levant was out of Byzantine control since 602 before Heraclius entering Jerusalem again in 628. It seems that Constantinople got used to not controlling the Levant and didnt mind that much when it happened again in 630.

    Indications are that there was an agreement, explaining the Byz. coins found in early Arab Levant.

    So again, isnt this rather an indication of a cultural collaps rather than a military collaps?
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10002 - March 08, 2021, 03:47 PM

    The question was :
    Quote
    Yarmouk:

    I still think it is relevant that non-muslim sources dont mention it. This is supposed to be a very decisive battle. How come the Roman side didnt record it?

    Quote

    Quote
    Altara
    Pub Regular

    That is the question.
    Heraclius died in 640 after a 30 years war and many events. The Arab taking over is 630 , Heraclius  was gone to Constantinople  (from Jerusalem) in 628 with an exhausted army.

    Quote
    You say Levant was out of Byzantine control since 602 before Heraclius entering Jerusalem again in 628. It seems that Constantinople got used to not controlling the Levant and didnt mind that much when it happened again in 630.


    1/ Yes.
    2/ They not controlled it because of the war vs the Persians and the troubles they got with their Arab allies in the end of the 6th c. (Greek text I posted). I'm not convincing of the Nevo thesis of the abandon of those places (Egypt and Palestine-Syria).
    Byz. coins are logically used by Arabs as those have never had any coins before:  they used the existing ones.
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10003 - March 08, 2021, 03:56 PM

    Cuypers lecture (in French) :

    Rhétorique sémitique, composition et intertextualité dans le Coran. L'exemple de la Fâtiha. Vidéo-conférence de Michel Cuypers, à l’Université El-Qaraouiyine, Dar el-hadith el-hasania, Rabat, 27-02-21 (Semitic rhetoric, composition and intertextuality in the Koran. The example of the Fâtiha. Video-conference by Michel Cuypers, at the University El-Qaraouiyine, Dar el-hadith el-hasania, Rabat, 27-02-21)

    https://www.academia.edu/video/lmabql
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10004 - March 10, 2021, 09:26 PM

    Robert Hoyland - Insider and Outsider Sources: Historiographical Reflections on Late Antique Arabia

    http://www.almuslih.com/Library/Hoyland,%20R%20-%20Historiographical%20reflections.pdf
    Quote
    In the introduction to my 2001 book on Arabia and the Arabs I made a distinction between writings by insiders and writings by outsiders, on the subject of the inhabitants of the Arabian Peninsula and its northern extension, the Syrian desert- and steppe-lands. The former are rare and consist primarily of inscriptions and, from the sixth century, poetry, whereas the latter, though fragmentary and hailing from many different sources in diverse languages, are relatively numerous. But do all the relevant texts fit neatly into one of these two categories, or should we accept that there may be degrees of insider-ness/outsider-ness and that the lines between the two categories may be blurred? And even where the distinction is clear, should we always prefer the testimony of an insider to that of an outsider? Finally, what value should we assign to Muslim sources, which, in their extant form, date no earlier than the ninth century? Do we assume that they tap directly into pre-Islamic Arab traditions and so deserve insider status, or must we posit some rupture in Arab history (occasioned, for instance, by the seventh-century Arab conquests or the eighth-century ʿAbbāsid revolution), which consigns the Muslim tradition to outsider status? In the course of this paper I will select a few pertinent examples and offer some reflections on these questions.

    Quote
    In an important recent publication on the Arab allies of the empires of the Late Antique Near East C.J. Robin raised the question of the nature of the relationship between the so-called kingdoms of Ghassān, Lakhm, and Kinda and the tribes that go by these names. His own preference was to assume very little relationship: ‘Les soi-disant royaumes de Kinda, de Ghassān et de Lakhm ne sont pas des principautés assises sur les tribus de Kinda, Ghassān et de Lakhm, comme on l’affirme fréquemment’. Rather, he says, we should distinguish between the tribes and the princely dynasties to which the empires of Rome, Persia, and Ḥimyar had delegated certain powers and awarded certain subsidies and titles. The most famous of these dynasties were the Ḥujrids of Kinda, the Jafnids of Ghassān, and the Naṣrids of Lakhm. But though they may have originated from the tribes of Kinda, Ghassān, and Lakhm, these Arab dynasts were appointed by the empires to keep control of other tribes and to provide military support from whatever tribes would join them; they were not appointed over their own tribes of origin and did not act as, or derive their support from being, leaders of a single tribe.

    F. Millar has accepted this hypothesis, but points out that the surviving contemporary documentation does not support the use of either of the two terms, the tribe or the dynasty. Thus of Ghassān he observes:

    The modern historiography of the most important group allied with Rome in the sixth century begins with a work published by the great Theodor Nöldeke in 1887, Die ghassānischen Fürsten aus dem Hause Jafna’s—hence the common use ever since of the terms ‘Ghassanids’ and (more recently) ‘Jafnids’, to denote this dynasty. But the entire contemporary evidence discussed here, literary and documentary, in Latin, Greek, Syriac, and Arabic, from within the [Roman] empire does not contain a single expression which equates to, or could properly be translated as, either ‘Ghassanid’ or ‘Jafnid’ ... Our capacity to define either a people or a dynasty by these names derives from Arabic sources written several centuries later.


  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10005 - March 11, 2021, 01:39 AM

    To find this (important) book is the issue.
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10006 - March 11, 2021, 01:50 AM

    THE PEOPLES BEYOND THE ARABIAN FRONTIER
    IN LATE ANTIQUITY: RECENT EPIGRAPHIC
    DISCOVERIES AND LATEST ADVANCES∗
    Christian Julien Robin
    Abstract
    For a century, the research on the interactions between the Roman empire
    and its neighbours on the Arabian frontier was based on texts transmitted by
    Muslim scholars. Th e gradual opening up of the vast Arabian Peninsula to
    archaeological research from the 1950s onwards has now resulted in major
    advances and radical revisions of previous views. In this paper, we shall provide
    an overview of these new developments in the fi eld, among which the multiplication
    of precise chronological and geographical data can be mentioned, owing to
    the discovery of numerous dated inscriptions that have been found in situ. As
    far as revisions are concerned, we can mention the evidence for the domination
    of the kingdom of Ḥimyar over Arabia from around 350 to 560 and the challenge
    to the ideas of the ‘migrations’ of tribes and ‘domination’ of nomads. We
    can add the new perspective on the offi cial religion of Ḥimyar, which—as now
    seems clear—consisted in a kind of monotheism inspired by Judaism, followed,
    from around 500 onwards, by Christianity. Concerning the role of Rome in the
    aff airs of Arabia, it will be argued that the existence of a real frontier in the sixth
    century can now be considered as doubtful.
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10007 - March 11, 2021, 09:50 AM

    Thomas Sizgorich - “Do Prophets Come with a Sword?” Conquest, Empire, and Historical Narrative in the Early Islamic World

    https://academic.oup.com/ahr/article/112/4/993/15908
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10008 - March 11, 2021, 10:00 AM

    Shih-Cong Fan Chiang - Urban Civilians' Experiences in the Romano-Persian Wars, 502-591 CE

    https://kclpure.kcl.ac.uk/portal/files/51216341/2015_Chiang_Shih_Cong_Fan_1043779_ethesis.pdf
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10009 - March 12, 2021, 10:05 AM

    To find this (important) book is the issue.


    which book are you talking about Altara?  the book/s from the German Scholar   Theodor Nöldeke

    Quote
    F. Millar has accepted this hypothesis, but points out that the surviving contemporary documentation does not support the use of either of the two terms, the tribe or the dynasty. Thus of Ghassān he observes:

    The modern historiography of the most important group allied with Rome in the sixth century begins with a work published by the great Theodor Nöldeke in 1887, Die ghassānischen Fürsten aus dem Hause Jafna’s—hence the common use ever since of the terms ‘Ghassanids’ and (more recently) ‘Jafnids’, to denote this dynasty. But the entire contemporary evidence discussed here, literary and documentary, in Latin, Greek, Syriac, and Arabic, from within the [Roman] empire does not contain a single expression which equates to, or could properly be translated as, either ‘Ghassanid’ or ‘Jafnid’ ... Our capacity to define either a people or a dynasty by these names derives from Arabic sources written several centuries later.


    The History of the Qurʾān.pdf certainly a wonderful book from him... but very few so-called scholars of Islam read such books and followed his investigations on the origins of Quran

    Do not let silence become your legacy.. Question everything   
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10010 - March 12, 2021, 02:26 PM

    The Second Coming of the Book: Rethinking Qur’anic Scripturology and Prophetology

    well that is some 350 pages Ph. D,  thesis by Mohsen Goudarzi Taghanaki   submitted in  2018  Harvard University., Cambridge,    Afshordi Mohsen Goudarzi [/u] is Iranian migrated to US OF A and presently  faculty member at  University of Minnesota  ., here is a link academia.edu  publications from that place

    https://umn.academia.edu/Departments/Classical_and_Near_Eastern_Studies/Documents

    Do not let silence become your legacy.. Question everything   
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10011 - March 12, 2021, 03:40 PM

    which book are you talking about Altara?


    J.H.F. Dijkstra & G. Fisher (eds), Inside and Out. Interactions
    between Rome and the Peoples on the Arabian and
    Egyptian Frontiers in Late Antiquity, LAHR 8, ISBN 978-
    90-429-3124-4
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10012 - March 12, 2021, 10:32 PM

    J.H.F. Dijkstra & G. Fisher (eds), Inside and Out. Interactions
    between Rome and the Peoples on the Arabian and
    Egyptian Frontiers in Late Antiquity, LAHR 8, ISBN 978-
    90-429-3124-4

    Each  review of that book is addressing  different aspect of interaction between Roman ruling class and those who were natives  of that  time ., which one of those review of that book you think is important to understand that Roman and Arabian native interactions/dynamics ??


    INSIDE AND OUT : INTERACTIONS BETWEEN ROME AND THE PEOPLES ON THE ARABIAN AND EGYPTIAN FRONTIERS IN LATE ANTIQUITY

    Quote
    Table of Contents:

    Machine generated contents note: Peoples beyond the Arabian Frontier in Late Antiquity: Recent Epigraphic Discoveries and Latest Advances ............... Christian Julien Robin

    A. Anthropological Approach  Meeting of the Twain: Tribe and State ............ Philip Carl Salzman

    Desert and River: Consumption and Colonial Entanglements in Roman and Late Antique Nubia..........Stuart Tyson Smith

    B. Precursors.

    Rome's Relations with the Arab/Indigenous People in the First--Third Centuries............. Ariel S. Lewin

    'Romans Go Home'? Rome and Other 'Outsiders' as Viewed from the Syro-Arabian Desert ......... Michael C.A. Macdonald

    Papyrological Evidence on 'Barbarians' in the Egyptian Eastern Desert .............Helene Cuvigny

    'Barbarian' Names on the Third-Century Ostraka from Xeron............. Helmut Satzinger

    C. 'Outside' Sources..

    Arabs, Outsiders, and Stereotypes from Ammianus Marcellinus to Theophylact Simocatta............... Conor Whately

    Writing the Histories of Romans and Arabs in the Fifth-Century Roman East .................Hugh Elton

    Procopius and Roman Imperial Policy in the Arabian and Egyptian Frontier Zones ................Geoffrey Greatrex

    D. 'Inside' Sources

    Insider and Outsider Sources: Historiographical Reflections on Late Antique Arabia ........................ Robert G. Hoyland

    State and Tribe in Late Antique Arabia: A Comparative View ........................Greg Fisher

    'I, Silko, Came to Talmis and Taphis': Interactions between the Peoples beyond the Egyptian Frontier and Rome in Late Antiquity .......................Jitse H.F. Dijkstra

    Reconstructing the Social and Cultural History of the Aksumite Kingdom: Some Methodological Reflections......................... Pierluigi Piovanelli

    E. Religious Dimension

    Christianity and the Arabs in the Sixth Century ................ Philip Wood

    Ethiopian Apocalyptic and the End of Roman Rule: The Reception of Chalcedon in Aksum and the Kebra Nagast ..............George Bevan

    F. Aftermath

    Consolidating the Conquest: Arab-Muslim Rule in Syria and the Jazirah, 630--775 ce .................. R. Stephen Humphreys

    Creating Christian Nubia: Processes and Events on the Egyptian Frontier ................ David N. Edwards.


    Review of that book by Alessandro Bausi, UniversitÃt Hamburg

    Do not let silence become your legacy.. Question everything   
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10013 - March 13, 2021, 12:46 AM

     All articles seems interesting;  I have the Robin one (https://www.academia.edu/37672125/_The_peoples_beyond_the_Arabian_frontier_in_Late_Antiquity_recent_epigraphic_discoveries_and_latest_advances_%C3%A9dd_Dijkstra_and_Fisher_Inside_and_Out_Late_Antique_History_and_Religion_8_Leuven_Peeters_2014_pp_33_79)  and Zeca posted the Hoyland one.
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10014 - March 13, 2021, 12:05 PM

    Also the Philip Wood article: https://www.academia.edu/7806301/_Christianity_and_the_Arabs_in_the_sixth_century_in_G_Fisher_and_J_Djikstra_eds_Inside_and_Out_Interactions_Between_Rome_and_the_Peoples_on_the_Arabian_and_Egyptian_Frontiers_in_Late_Antiquity_Peeters_2014_
    Quote
    The Arab peoples of the borderlands between Rome and Persia were useful allies to the Great Powers in the course of their military confrontation. Religious affiliation was an important marker of allegiance during this conflict, and we see Christianity being used in the fifth century as a sign of Roman clientage. However, the increasing importance of non-Chalcedonian confessions meant that Christianity could be de-coupled from its Roman associations, and take on other forms of political significance in the hands of both the Persian shahs and the Arab rulers themselves.

  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10015 - March 16, 2021, 11:18 AM

    Forthcoming book

    Alain George - The Umayyad Mosque of Damascus: Art, Faith and Empire in Early Islam

    https://www.gingko.org.uk/title/the-umayyad-mosque-of-damascus/
    Quote
    The Umayyad Mosque of Damascus is one of the oldest continuously used religious sites in the world. The mosque we see today was built in 705 by the Umayyad caliph al-Walid on top of a 4th-century Christian church which had been erected over a temple of Jupiter. Incredibly, in the recent war the mosque has remained almost unscathed, but over the centuries it was continuously rebuilt, after being damaged by earthquakes and fires.

    In this comprehensive biography of the Umayyad Mosque, the author, Alain Fouad George, has explored a wide range of sources to excavate the dense layers of its history and establish what the building looked like when it was first built. George has found new information in three previously untranslated poems written at the time the mosque was built, as well as in descriptions left by medieval scholars. He has also looked carefully at the many photographs and paintings made by 19th-century European travellers, particularly those who recorded the building before the catastrophic fire of 1893.


    19th century photos:

    https://www.gingko.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/UMD-page-30.pdf

    https://www.gingko.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/UMD-page-124.pdf
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10016 - March 17, 2021, 01:20 PM

    Ahmad Al-Jallad - The Religion and Rituals of the Nomads of Pre-Islamic Arabia: A Reconstruction based on the Safaitic Inscriptions

    https://www.academia.edu/s/4d2f172036

    Thread: https://twitter.com/Safaitic/status/1370769084208578571
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10017 - March 18, 2021, 03:45 PM

    Ahmad Al-Jallad - The Religion and Rituals of the Nomads of Pre-Islamic Arabia: A Reconstruction based on the Safaitic Inscriptions

    https://www.academia.edu/s/4d2f172036

    Thread: https://twitter.com/Safaitic/status/1370769084208578571

    Quote
    Traditional Arabian religion disappeared more than 1400 years ago. This is an attempt (draft) to reconstruct the beliefs and practices of the North Arabian pagans - as attested in Safaitic - based on their texts. Open for comments and discussion: https://academia.edu/s/4d2f172036?source=work



    I hope  Ahmad  does not get mad at me ..   but but I wonder whether he know  these   places ..........Mecca  and Medina .........

    Are they in  North Arabia   or southern Arabia??  or eastern Arabia or western Arabia??

    Do not let silence become your legacy.. Question everything   
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10018 - March 21, 2021, 02:58 PM

    Isaac Wilk de Oliveira - Standing under the Mountain: Jewish and Christian Threads to a Qur'ānic Construction

    https://www.academia.edu/44976276/Standing_under_the_Mountain_Jewish_and_Christian_Threads_to_a_Qurānic_Construction
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10019 - March 21, 2021, 03:07 PM

    Isaac Wilk de Oliveira - Response to Gabriel Said Reynolds, “Biblical Turns of Phrase in the Qur’ān”

    https://www.academia.edu/40629355/Response_to_Gabriel_Said_Reynolds_Biblical_Turns_of_Phrase_in_the_Qur_ān_
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