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 Topic: Qur'anic studies today

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  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #6330 - March 27, 2019, 08:54 PM


    Essentially  Brother Michel-Marie  ...lol.. says.....  WHOLE STORY OF PROPHET OF ISLAM "MUHAMMAD"IS FAKE... .. I wonder what he will say how much of Christ story we know  is fact...real fact??


    The (very) big difference is that Jesus is never said (contrariwise to the Quran says) to be the Gospel(s) producer.
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #6331 - March 27, 2019, 08:56 PM

    Looking forward to this book. Looks very promising. Just look at that table of contents.


    Part I: The State of Qur'anic Studies
    1: Academic Scholarship and the Qur'an, Andrew Rippin
    2: Modern Developments in Qur'anic Studies, Oliver Leaman
    3: Islamic Origins and the Qur'an, Herbert Berg X
    4: Qur'anic Studies: Bibliographical Survey, Anna Akasoy
    Part II: The Historical Setting of the Qur'an
    5: Late Antique Near Eastern Context: Social and Religious Aspects, Muntasir F. al-Hamad and John F. Healey
    6: Arabian Context of the Qur'an: History and the Text, Harry Munt
    7: The Linguistic Landscape of pre-Islamic Arabia: Context for the Qur'an, Ahmad Al-Jallad
    8: Qur'anic Exempla and Late Antique Narratives, Marianna Klar X
    9: The Qur'an and Judaism, Reuven Firestone
    10: The Qur'an and Christianity, Neal Robinson
    Part III: The Qur'an: Textual Transmission, Codification, Manuscripts, Inscriptions and Printed Editions
    11: The Manuscript and Archaeological traditions: Physical Evidence, François Déroche X
    12: The Form of the Qur'an: Historical Contours, Yasin Dutton
    13: The Corpus of Qur'anic Readings (qirā'āt): History, Synthesis and Authentication, Mustafa Shah X
    14: Glorifying God's Word: Manuscripts of the Qur'an, Sheila S. Blair
    15: Inscribing God's Word: Quranic texts on Architecture, Objects, and Other Solid Supports, Sheila S. Blair
    16: A History of Printed Editions of the Qur'an, Efim A. Rezvan
    Part IV: Structural and Literary Dimensions of the Qur'an
    17: Language of the Qur'an, A. H. Mathias Zahniser X
    18: Vocabulary of the Qur'an: Meaning in Context, Mustafa Shah
    19: Qur'anic Syntax, Michel Cuypers X
    20: Rhetorical Devices and Stylistic Features of Qur'anic Grammar, Muhammad Abdel Haleem
    21: Inner-Qur'anic Chronology, Nicolai Sinai X
    22: The Structure of the Qur'an: The Inner Dynamic of the Sūra, Mustansir Mir
    23: Discussions of Qur'anic Inimitability: The Theological Nexus, Ayman A. El-Desouky
    24: The Qur'an and the Arabic Medieval Literary Tradition, Geert Jan van Gelder
    25: The Qur'an and Arabic Poetry, Stefan Sperl
    Part V: Topics and Themes of the Qur'an
    26: Revelation and Prophecy in the Qur'an, Ulrika Mårtensson
    27: Doctrine and Dogma in the Qur'an, Stephen Burge
    28: Law and the Qur'an, Joseph Lowry
    29: Qur'anic Ethics, Ebrahim Moosa
    30: Eschatology and the Qur'an, Sebastian Günther X
    31: Prophets and Personalities of the Qur'an, Anthony H. Johns
    32: Politics and the Qur'an, Stefan Wild
    33: Jihad and the Qur'an: Classical and Modern Interpretations, Asma Afsaruddin
    34: Women and the Qur'an, Asma Afsaruddin
    35: (yawn...) X
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #6332 - March 27, 2019, 09:01 PM

    ................(yawn...)...........

     Cheesy Cheesy    Altara  yawning at all these scholars of that "old man _ young man  _  Mustafa Shah _ Abdel Haleem  " book  

     oh common  we didn't even read the book ., it is not even out Altara .,,

    none of these guys are good ?  not even one chapter nothing new in Islam from whole book .. let me list them and please select few authors for me to read..

    Quote

    1:  Andrew Rippin
    2:  Oliver Leaman
    3:   Herbert Berg
    4:  Anna Akasoy
    5:  , Muntasir F. al-Hamad and John F. Healey
    6:  Harry Munt
    7:  Ahmad Al-Jallad
    8:  Marianna Klar
    9: , Reuven Firestone
    10: Neal Robinson
    11:  François Déroche
    12:  Yasin Dutton
    13:  Mustafa Shah
    14:, Sheila S. Blair
    15: Sheila S. Blair
    16:  Efim A. Rezvan
    17:  A. H. Mathias Zahniser
    18: Mustafa Shah
    19: Michel Cuypers
    20:  Muhammad Abdel Haleem
    21: Nicolai Sinai
    22: Mustansir Mir
    23:  Ayman A. El-Desouky
    24:  Geert Jan van Gelder
    25:  Stefan Sperl
    26: Ulrika Mårtensson
    27: Stephen Burge
    28: Joseph Lowry
    29:   Ebrahim Moosa
    30:  Sebastian Günther
    31:  Anthony H. Johns
    32:   Stefan Wild
    33:   Asma Afsaruddin
    34:  Asma Afsaruddin


    So dear Altara out of those 30 or so folks .. WHOM SHOULD  I READ??  i selected 25:  Stefan Sperl ...

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #6333 - March 27, 2019, 09:04 PM

     YEEZ ! I put X at the end of line to mark what is (for me...) interesting!
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #6334 - March 27, 2019, 09:07 PM

    The (very) big difference is that Jesus is never said (contrariwise to the Quran says) to be the Gospel(s) producer.


    Oh well that also goes to Muhammad and Moses dear Altara....neither of them said OT or Quran  were produced by them..  So...What OT books have or what Quran has in it is very little to  do with what Prophet of Islam or Prophet of Judaism  said/did  (ASSUMING THEY WERE REAL)

    The fact is in all these  faiths people wrote as if these prophets said/wrote those faith books..

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #6335 - March 27, 2019, 09:09 PM

    YEEZ ! I put X at the end of line to mark what is (for me...) interesting!

    oh i see i did't put attention to that  "X" mark.. thanks i will read them....

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #6336 - March 28, 2019, 09:23 PM

    I mostly agree with Altara's list. I would only add one or two more articles to my interest list.
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #6337 - March 29, 2019, 10:15 AM

    I mostly agree with Altara's list. I would only add one or two more articles to my interest list.

    Hello Mahgraye...    Altara's list  consist of the works of these  guys....

    Quote
    3:   Herbert Berg X
    8: , Marianna Klar X
    11:  François Déroche X
    13: Mustafa Shah X
    17: A. H. Mathias Zahniser X
    19:  Michel Cuypers X
    21: Nicolai Sinai X
    30: Sebastian Günther X
    35: (yawn...) X

    i DON'T KNOW WHO THE HELL IS THAT "YAWN"GUY is  ...  but i read some of those 8guys..  So Mahgraye  you wanted me to read another two guys who are those two that are not listed by Altara ??

    with best regards'
    yeezevee


    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #6338 - March 29, 2019, 10:28 AM

    Oliver Leaman - Modern Developments in Qur'anic Studies

    Harry Munt - Arabian Context of the Qur'an: History and the Text

    Ahmad Al-Jallad - The Linguistic Landscape of pre-Islamic Arabia: Context for the Qur'an

    Reuven Firestone - The Qur'an and Judaism

    Neal Robinson - The Qur'an and Christianity

    Yasin Dutton - The Form of the Qur'an: Historical Contours

    Sheila S. Blair - Glorifying God's Word: Manuscripts of the Qur'an

    Ayman A. El-Desouky - Discussions of Qur'anic Inimitability: The Theological Nexus

    Geert Jan van Gelder - The Qur'an and the Arabic Medieval Literary Tradition

    Stefan Sperl - The Qur'an and Arabic Poetry

    Asma Afsaruddin - Jihad and the Qur'an: Classical and Modern Interpretations

    I have no idea what Altara meant by this yawn.
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #6339 - March 29, 2019, 11:32 AM

    Hello Mahgraye...    Altara's list  consist of the works of these  guys....
    i DON'T KNOW WHO THE HELL IS THAT "YAWN"GUY is  ...


    Hahaha!
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #6340 - March 29, 2019, 07:44 PM

    Here is a video I found with Rober Hoyland and Stephen Shoemaker from 2016.
    Shoemaker says that we should not search for the origins of Islam in a singel source tradition.
    He also says that there is no bases for a non- trinitarian Christian group that could inspire the formation of Islam.

    Is he correct? Are there no reason to believe that the first Muslims developed from non- trinitarian Christianity ?
    https://vimeo.com/148186511
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #6341 - March 29, 2019, 07:46 PM

    Seen the clip. Shomaker, like most scholars, does not believe that there survived any Jewish-Christians groups after the fourth century. This premise has been challenged, of course, but it still remains a matter of how one interprets the data. Read Guillaume Dye's contribution to the same volume for a critique of the Jewish-Christians hypothesis.

    For a different view, read Gallez, de Blois, Gnilka, Amir-Moezzi, Pines, Moussali,
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #6342 - March 29, 2019, 07:56 PM

    Zellentin (2019) - The Qur'an's Reformation of Judaism and Christianity

    Description:

    Quote
    This volume explores the relationship between the Qur’an and the Jewish and Christian traditions, considering aspects of continuity and reform. The chapters examine the Qur’an’s retelling of biblical narratives, as well as its reaction to a wide array of topics that mark Late Antique religious discourse, including eschatology and ritual purity, prophetology and paganism, and heresiology and Christology.

    Twelve emerging and established scholars explore the many ways in which the Qur’an updates, transforms, and challenges religious practice, beliefs, and narratives that Late Antique Jews and Christians had developed in dialogue with the Bible. The volume establishes the Qur’an’s often unique perspective alongside its surprising continuity with Judaism and Christianity. Chapters focus on individual suras and on intra-Qur’anic parallels, on the Qur’an’s relationship to pre-Islamic Arabian culture, on its intertextuality and its literary intricacy, and on its legal and moral framework. It illustrates a move away from the problematic paradigm of cultural influence and instead emphasizes the Qur’an’s attempt to reform the religious landscape of its time.

    The Qur'an's Reformation of Judaism and Christianity offers new insight into the Islamic Scripture as a whole and into recent methodological developments, providing a compelling snapshot of the burgeoning field of Qur’anic studies. It is a key resource for students and scholars interested in religion, Islam, and Middle Eastern Studies.


    Table of Contents:

    Quote
    Notes on contributors 1. The Qur’an and the reformation of Judaism and Christianity Holger M. Zellentin Part I: The Qur’an, the Bible, and the Islamic tradition 2.What would Ibn Taymiyya make of intertextual study of the Qur’an? The challenge of the isrāʾīliyyāt Jon Hoover 3. Prophecy and writing in the Qur’an, or why Muhammad was not a scribe Islam Dayeh 4. A "Religious Transformation in Late Antiquity": Qur’anic refigurations of pagan-Arab ideals based on biblical models Angelika Neuwirth 5. Meccan Gods, Jesus’ divinity: an analysis of sura 43 (al-Zukhruf) Walid A. Saleh Part II: The Qur’an and the Bible 6. Gentile purity law from the Bible to the Qur’an: the case of sexual purity and illicit intercourse Holger M. Zellentin 7. David and Solomon: antecedents, modalities and consequences of their twinship in the Qur’an Geneviève Gobillot Part III: The Qur’an and Judaism 8. Pharaoh’s submission to God in the Qur’an and in rabbinic literature: a case study in Qur’anic intertextuality Nicolai Sinai 9. The eschatological counter-discourse in the Qur’an and in the Babylonian Talmud, Sanhedrin, 90b-91a Mehdi Azaiez Part IV: The Qur’an and Christianity 10. Thrice upon a time: Abraham’s guests and the study of intra-Qur’anic parallels Joseph Witztum 11."Killing the prophets and stoning the messengers": two themes in the Qur’an and their background Gerald Hawting 12. On the Qur’an and Christian heresies Gabriel Said Reynolds 13. Reflections on the Qur’an, Christianity, and intertextuality Mary B. Cunningham Index of Qur'anic references


    Another promising looking book. It is nice that Gobillot and Azaiez's works are included in English.
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #6343 - March 29, 2019, 08:11 PM

    Mahgraye, thanks for your response. Uoy wrote that most scholars agree with Shoemaker, but what kind of explanation do they support?
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #6344 - March 29, 2019, 08:11 PM

    Yes.
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #6345 - March 29, 2019, 08:13 PM

    However, the prospect of a Jewish-Christian influence on the Quran and early Islam has become increasingly popular among scholars. According to Guy Stroumsa (if I remember correctly), a scholar who is not an adherent to the Jewish-Christian hypothesis, that most scholars think, or will think, that there was a Jewish-Christian influence on the Quran and early Islam.
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #6346 - March 29, 2019, 08:20 PM

    But where did that  nontrinitarianism come from, if it was not common around the 7th century?
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #6347 - March 29, 2019, 08:22 PM

    I do not know. The most recent discussion on the matter is Carlos Segovia's 2018 monograph The Quranic Jesus. But the possibility of a Jewish-Christian influence, here thinking specifically of Gallez's Judeo-Nazarene hypothesis, is especially tempting, and, dare I say, somewhat convincing. At the very least, it is attractive.
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #6348 - March 29, 2019, 10:09 PM

    Al-Naṣārā in the Qurʾān
    A hermeneutical reflection
    Sidney H. Griffith
    In Gabriel Said Reynolds (ed.), New Perspectives on the Qurʾān: The Qurʾān in its Historical Context 2 (London & New York: Routledge, 2011), pp. 301-322.
    [...]
    Who are the Qurʾān’s Nazoreans?
    Heretofore researchers have identified a number of different Christian communities as the likely Christians whose views they have found reflected in the Qurʾān’. For the most part, their methodology has been first to articulate what they take to be the Qurʾān’s own Christology, and consequent theology, and then to match it with the creedal formulae and reports of the beliefs of some historically attested earlier Christian community, usually much earlier than the seventh century and usually not otherwise known to have been in the Arabic-speaking milieu of the Qurʾān’s own day. The problem for these scholars has then been to advance a rationale for how the chosen community could have been present to the nascent Islamic community, whose scripture then, on the usual hypothesis, adopted the chosen Christian community’s Christological and theological position. Currently,  the two most frequently proposed groups are the Jewish-Christians, represented by the Nazarenes described in Epiphanius of Salamis’s Panarion,1 and a more*312 recently postulated group of Arabized, Syriac-speaking upholders of a supposed, pre-Nicene, Syrian theology. 2
    From the historical point of view, a significant problem for the suggestion that the Qurʾān’s Christology derives from a group of Jewish Christians, and specifically the Nazarenes in its milieu is, as Rémi Brague has pointed out most succinctly, “Nous n’avons pas de traces d’un lien direct entre le groupe judéo-chrétien expulsé de Jerusalem vers 66 et les événements situes six siècles plus tard.”3 It is a problem that caused François de Blois to be somewhat circumspect in phrasing his conclusion that “There was a community of Nazorean Christians in central Arabia, in the seventh century, unnoticed by the outside world.”4 As for Joachim Gnilka’s hypothesis that Jewish Christianity more broadly speaking was the point of contact between Christianity and the Qurʾān, the well-marshaled evidence he puts forward to support the hypothesis consists mainly of the “interesting parallels between the Koran and Jewish Christianity,”5 which parallels he finds in texts, many of which, he says, “are of Jewish Christian origin.”6 But the problem here is that many if not most of these texts, and especially the Diatessaron, along with motifs otherwise found in apocryphal Gospels, had a long life in the Syriac literature of the decidedly non-Jewish Christian churches, mostly “Jacobite” and “Nestorian,” actually known to have been actively present in the Arabic-speaking milieu in the seventh century. There is a similar problem with Karl-Heinz Ohlig’s suggestion that there was some sort of pre-Nicene, Syrian theology current among some Arabized, Syriac-speaking communities in the Qurʾān’s immediate milieu. As we shall see, all the actual traces of Syriac speaking Christianity an1ong the Arabic-speaking peoples reflect language and lore otherwise found only in texts by resolutely Nicene Syriac writers, such as Ephraem the Syrian or Jacob of Sarug. In addition to their inability to find immediate historical evidence for stipulating the presence of Jewish Christians, Nazarenes or pre-Nicene, Syriac speaking Christians, be it in Arabia or elsewhere in the seventh or eighth centuries, a further problem with these hypotheses, articulated solely on the basis of the historical-critical method’s search for sources, is that their proponents ignore the contextual method’s complementary attention to the canonical Qurʾān’s own rhetorical strategy to engage in a polemical characterization of the positions of its religious adversaries. It is the burden of the present undertaking to argue that taking the controversial intent and the polemical cast of the Qurʾān’s language into account supports the hypothesis that the Christians and their doctrines that are in the Islamic scripture’s purview, and which the Qurʾān criticizes, are none other *313  than those of the mainline “Melkites,” “Jacobites” and ‘’Nestorians” of the seventh and eighth centuries, whose presence and whose language and lore can actually be shown to have been present both in Arabia and in the greater Syro-Palestinian-Mesopotamian milieu from at least the sixth century onward, well into early Islamic times.
    The Nazoreans
    According to the Qur’an, al-naṣārā say, “The Messiah is the son of God,” a statement, the text goes on to say, in which “they emulate the language of the unbelievers of yore” (al-Tawba [9] 30). This Qurāʾnic critique is at variance with what is reported of either the Panarion’s Nazarenes or most other Jewish Christian groups,7 none of whom explicitly confess that the Messiah is the Son of God.8 Contrariwise, that Jesus, the Messiah, is the Son of God, and therefore God in person, is a basic creedal affirmation of each of the mainline, Nicene Christian communities actually contemporary with the Qurʾān, albeit that their differing Christologies prevented their ecclesial communion with one another. The Qur’an not only does not affirm what these Qurāʾnic al-naṣārā affirm; it explicitly rejects their common creed and engages in polemical attacks against it!
    So why would the Qur’an call the mostly “Jacobite” and “Nestorian,” Syriac and Arabic-speaking Christians in its environs al-naṣārā? Perhaps because, as the Qur’an itself says, the Christians say, “We are naṣārā” (al-Maʾida [5] 14 & 82). But given the whiff of ancient heresy attached to the name, and its limited usage in Christian parlance, why would the Christians in the Qurʾān’s milieu have called themselves by this name? Perhaps they did so just because the Muslims of Yathrib/ Medina called them naṣārā, the name for Christians that their own texts reported as being not infrequently applied to them by other non-Christians, most notably, in Syriac texts, by Persian officials.
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #6349 - March 29, 2019, 10:31 PM

    Yes. There are other, reasonable ways to interpret the Nazarene's in the Quran. I agree. And I am not saying that you are wrong, Altara. Only that in some ways, the other hypothesis is possible, and attractive, and does explain some aspects. For another criticism, see Dye.
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #6350 - March 29, 2019, 10:35 PM

    But it does seem that Griffith misunderstands de Blois' actual position on the Nazarenes. De Blois does that think that the Quranic Nazarenes believe that Christ is the son of God. Q 9:30 is not at variance with de Blois' article.
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #6351 - March 29, 2019, 10:39 PM

    As we have seen above, the Arabic name naṣārā, as we have it in the Qur’an, is etymologically in all probability a calque on the Syriac name naṣārā, which in Syriac texts, as in Greek in Acts 24:5 and elsewhere, occurs mainly as a name used for Christians by non-Christian adversaries. And as Jerome said, the others called Christians “Nazoreans” “quasi pro obprobrio.”In other words, the name has an anti-Christian ring to it. So why would Arabic-speaking Christians have said, “We are naṣārā,” as the Qur’an reports? Or did they? One can only speculate in reply. Whereas in general the Qurʾān’ displays a high quotient of awareness of * 314 contemporary Christian language and lore, and a considerable amount of biblical savvy that allows it to comment on, critique and amplify earlier scriptural narratives, the composer of the Qurʾān’ was probably also well aware of the connotations of the name al-naṣārā among Christians and for this very reason uses the name in its text, even putting it into the mouths of the Christian interlocutors themselves, rhetorically precisely because of its potential for suggesting disapproval
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #6352 - March 29, 2019, 10:49 PM

    Thanks.
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #6353 - March 29, 2019, 10:57 PM

    Yes. There are other, reasonable ways to interpret the Nazarene's in the Quran. I agree. And I am not saying that you are wrong, Altara. Only that in some ways, the other hypothesis is possible, and attractive, and does explain some aspects. For another criticism, see Dye.


    For any people knowing Syriac, (90% of the pop.) in  Syria-Palestine-Iraq,  in reading Q 9,30 in the 6/7 th c. the characterization has no doubt. It deals about institutionalized Nicene Christians whatever they are (Catholics, Jacobites, Nestorians) who say exactly what Q 9,30 say , they continue the phrase automatically in their mind : Q 9,30+ "and God" because being the son of God is being God in institutionalized Christian theology.
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #6354 - March 30, 2019, 08:57 AM

    Concerning Nazarenes:

    Dye says that an existing judeo-christian sect is not necessary to come to the Quranic christology of the beginning of the 7th C. It could be something created on the spot out of the existing ideologies. Just an extra heresy or whatever.

    I don't see why what the author(s) of the Quran have penned down must be the result of a centuries old evolution of a certain ideology thaat was popular in a substantially large group. It looks like these author(s) indeed made up something quite new. Here again I come to the secret societies of which we have evidence in Judaism. We see that such societies are from all times. So why not some "brothers"versed in different faiths coming together, electing a prophet (not necessarily Mohammed), penning down their ideology in a semi secret language (Quranic rasm). This all under the patronage of a rich mecenas.

    When spoils were readily available they raised a mercenary army (not meant pejoratively) of people of all faiths, but (ideological) control was kept by the "secret society".

    I think this scenario would explain quite a lot!
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #6355 - March 30, 2019, 09:22 AM

    ...............

    When spoils were readily available they raised a mercenary army (not meant pejoratively) of people of all faiths, but (ideological) control was kept by the "secret society".

    I think this scenario would explain quite a lot!


    Go back to  Islam say 7th century or even 6th century(if there was Islam in 6th century+}
     and give me examples of that AND THE REASONS  FOR  PEOPLE OF ALL FAITHS  to  convert in to Islam dear  mundi .   

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #6356 - March 30, 2019, 09:39 AM

    Zellentin (2019) - The Qur'an's Reformation of Judaism and Christianity

    Description:

    Table of Contents:

    Another promising looking book. It is nice that Gobillot and Azaiez's works are included in English.

    Mahgraye  says that as A PROMISING BOOK   ...  let me look in to it..



    The Qur'an's Reformation of Judaism and Christianity  &  Return to the Origins

    Edited By Holger M. Zellentin

    Hmm ....  Return to the Origins  ....  Return to the Origins??   Very  very CATCHY TITLE   for an edited book...  it is not even his book..

    Quote
    This volume explores the relationship between the Qur’an and the Jewish and Christian traditions, considering aspects of continuity and reform. The chapters examine the Qur’an’s retelling of biblical narratives, as well as its reaction to a wide array of topics that mark Late Antique religious discourse, including eschatology and ritual purity, prophetology and paganism, and heresiology and Christology.

    Twelve emerging and established scholars explore the many ways in which the Qur’an updates, transforms, and challenges religious practice, beliefs, and narratives that Late Antique Jews and Christians had developed in dialogue with the Bible. The volume establishes the Qur’an’s often unique perspective alongside its surprising  gives continuity to Judaism and Christianity. Chapters focus on individual suras and on intra-Qur’anic parallels, on the Qur’an’s relationship to pre-Islamic Arabian culture, on its intertextuality and its literary intricacy, and on its legal and moral framework. It illustrates a move away from the problematic paradigm of cultural influence and instead emphasizes the Qur’an’s attempt to reform the religious landscape of its time.

    The Qur'an's Reformation of Judaism and Christianity offers new insight into the Islamic Scripture as a whole and into recent methodological developments, providing a compelling snapshot of the burgeoning field of Qur’anic studies. It is a key resource for students and scholars interested in religion, Islam, and Middle Eastern Studies.

    I guess dr, Holger M. Zellentin   IS LOOKING & READING FEW SELECTIVE VERSES IN QURAN not reading it in its totality 


    Quote
    2017. Judaeo-Christian Legal Culture and the Qur’ān. In: HILALI, A. and BURGE, S., eds., Contemporary Qur’anic Studies Oxford University Press.
    ZELLENTIN, H. M., 2016. In: REYNOLDS, G, AZAIEZ, M., TESEI, T. and ZAFER, H.M., eds., The Qurʾan Seminar Commentary: A Collaborative Analysis of 50 Select Passages De Gruyter. 44-452 (In Press.)
    ZELLENTIN, H.M., 2016. Aḥbār and Ruhbān: Religious Leaders in the Qur’ān in Dialogue with Christian and Jewish Literature. In: NEUWIRTH, A., ed., Qur’anic Studies at the University of Chicago Routledge. 258-89 (In Press.)
    ZELLENTIN, H.M., 2016. Jewish Dreams Between Roman Palestine and Sasanian Babylonia: Cultural and Geographic Borders in Rabbinic Discourse (yMa‘aser Sheni 55c, 15-22 and bBerakhot 56a-b). In: WEISSENRIEDER, A., ed., Borders: Terms, Performances and Ideologies Mohr Siebeck. 419-57 (In Press.)
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    ZELLENTIN, H.M., 2016. Review of Christoph Ochs, Matthaeus Adversus Christianos Journal of Ecclesiastical History. 67, 148-51
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    ZELLENTIN, H.M., 2009. Review: The Origins of Judaism: From Canaan to the Rise of Islam (Robert Goldenberg) Henoch: Studies in Judaism and Christianity from Second Temple to Antiquity. 39, 430-2
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    ZELLENTIN, H. M., 2013. The Qur’ān’s Legal Culture: The Didascalia Apostolorum as a Point of Departure Mohr Siebeck.

    well that is an interesting paper to read...

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #6357 - March 30, 2019, 09:44 AM

    Yeez,

    Quote
    AND THE REASONS  FOR  PEOPLE OF ALL FAITHS  to  convert in to Islam dear  mundi .


    I did not say people converted to Islam. Contrary. I say they fought in the army of "the secret society". And these people fought or allied with them because they were paid. That would take into account Donner's evidence of a multi-faith army.
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #6358 - March 30, 2019, 09:50 AM

    Yeez,

    I did not say people converted to Islam. Contrary. I say they fought in the army of "the secret society". And these people fought or allied with them because they were paid. That would take into account Donner's evidence of a multi-faith army.

    Oh  that is a very good point and distinction mundi...  Now  let us take some examples of that on countries/cultures that converted in to Islam   say from 9th century to  18th century and reasons for that ...  I think there must be SOME GOOD REASONS for people to convert in to Islam


    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #6359 - March 30, 2019, 09:55 AM

    Quote
    9th century to  18th century


    That is not the period we are looking at. That period is not relevant for early 7th C.
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