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 Topic: Qur'anic studies today

 (Read 1059960 times)
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  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10620 - February 02, 2022, 04:45 PM

    I casually read through that  Eleonore's  "Sanʿaʾ Palimpsest" pub., that is a good one., thank you zeca 
     and I wonder whether you have collected list of  publications that deals with these "Sanʿaʾ Palimpsest" ? If you did., I would appreciate such list.


    I haven't done this. Some kind of bibliography would be useful but there's nothing that comes to mind.
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10621 - February 02, 2022, 05:06 PM

    Shoemaker reviews Jack Tannous: https://www.academia.edu/44442103/Review_of_Jack_Tannous_The_Making_of_the_Medieval_Middle_East_Religion_Society_and_Simple_Believers
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10622 - February 02, 2022, 05:56 PM

    Shoemaker reviews Christian Sahner: https://www.academia.edu/44165951/Review_of_Christian_C_Sahner_Christian_Martyrs_Under_Islam_Religious_Violence_and_the_Making_of_the_Muslim_World
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10623 - February 02, 2022, 11:17 PM

    I haven't done this. Some kind of bibliography would be useful but there's nothing that comes to mind.

     Well Not you., I thought you may have seen some sort of bibliography from some M. S. or Ph. D. student  that are working in the field of Islam..  This is really surprising that no one has done it.,  Well let us do it here in that Resource Center Folder  .. well let me start the folder in the Resource Center..,

    WINDS ARE SHIFTING FAST .. We need  as much information as possible ON THOSE QURAN MANUSCRIPTS before it became the present   Gobbledy Gook Book

    well as I was reading Quran chapter 41 of the book ((aka chapter 61 of revelation order ))  The Surah Ha Mim As Sajdah, also known as Surah Fussilat and its tafseers  from various folks I came across   this fool and what he says on Tafseers of Quran..

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G7M_GS9bbng

    let me see what he says on that  and I often wonder All these..... Scholars /professors/doctors/actors ........ from west  whether they actually read the whole book and Tafseers of various folks  or they are also like that joker above ??

    Do not let silence become your legacy.. Question everything   
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10624 - February 03, 2022, 08:44 PM

    Shady Nasser on Mythvision
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sI1q1WW8zZw
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10625 - February 03, 2022, 09:41 PM

    Pre-Islamic Arabia - Robert Hoyland with Apostate Prophet
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SdjjR5LHdZw
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10626 - February 09, 2022, 08:20 PM

    Syriac Christians - Michael Penn on Mythvision
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I6wZ9YmxpaQ
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10627 - February 10, 2022, 12:55 AM


    Happy new Year to Everybody
    how are you all?


    Happy new Year to you as well.

    Quote
    Zellentin article is not clear.
    Of course he somehow prises the text, but I still feel some discomfort.
    In the beginning he refers to a book as not referring explicitly to the Islamic historiography, but in the end it ends up to confirm the Islamic chronology somehow.


    GHAFFAR book is exactly what Zellentin says. Fortunately (!) he ends with the traditional narrative. It does not surprise me as GHAFFAR is Muslim, he is then stuck with the traditional narrative which is a mandatory dogma.

    Quote
    Anyway, Altara, if you had a chance to read it, what parts are more fruitful to read? Just for my non-trained prospective so I know  where may I raise my attention.

    You could check the book following the chapters indicated by Zellentin. It is what I did. Interesting things, but not so useful as it is surrounded by the frame Mecca/kaba which emerge regularly.
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10628 - February 11, 2022, 01:09 AM

    So here's Stephen Shoemaker on Derek Lambert's Mythvision podcast.


    Quote
    The oldest Islamic biography of Muhammad, written in the mid-eighth century, relates that the prophet died at Medina in 632, while earlier and more numerous Jewish, Christian, Samaritan, and even Islamic sources indicate that Muhammad survived to lead the conquest of Palestine, beginning in 634-35. Although this discrepancy has been known for several decades, Stephen J. Shoemaker here writes the first systematic study of the various traditions.

    Using methods and perspectives borrowed from biblical studies, Shoemaker concludes that these reports of Muhammad's leadership during the Palestinian invasion likely preserve an early Islamic tradition that was later revised to meet the needs of a changing Islamic self-identity. Muhammad and his followers appear to have expected the world to end in the immediate future, perhaps even in their own lifetimes, Shoemaker contends. When the eschatological Hour failed to arrive on schedule and continued to be deferred to an ever more distant point, the meaning of Muhammad's message and the faith that he established needed to be fundamentally rethought by his early followers.


    Gallez already said the same thing in 2005.
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10629 - February 14, 2022, 11:33 AM

    Shady Nasser with Apostate Prophet
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-XJ4bxYYPVE
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10630 - February 16, 2022, 07:34 AM

    Marijn van Putten:

    "So I propose to instead focus on what we can derive from the one portion of the text that we can reliably date to the very earliest period, namely the consonantal text. Examining the linguistic features of its orthography, rhyme and structure, we can compare this against what, for example, we find in pre-Islamic Arabic as well as what the medieval grammarians report for the different dialects. Doing so a strikingly consistent picture emerges: in virtually all its linguistic features the Quran reflects a Hijazi dialect.
    This is not surprising, the Quran comes from the Hijaz. And this functions as extra evidence for that.

    However what is surprising is that you would not get that result if you would go from the Quranic reading traditions, which contain many non-Hijazi features.
    Thus there seems to have been a movement from the Hijazi origins of the Quranic language towards the language of the reading traditions which (artificially) incorporated all kinds of non-Hijazi features. The last chapters search for traces of this "Classicization" of the readings"

    I haven't read van Putten's book and am not able to evaluate it. He writes that the Quran comes from Hijaz. Does his work once and for all put an end to "revisionist" ideas that it emerged further north?

    https://twitter.com/PhDniX/status/1493634254332473347?s=20&t=gbrgwUyUq7FbxJmeKK0E2g
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10631 - February 16, 2022, 10:57 AM

    Here's the book. It's open access.

    Marijn van Putten - Quranic Arabic from its Hijazi Origins to its Classical Reading Traditions

    https://brill.com/view/title/61587
    Quote
    What was the language of the Quran like, and how do we know? Today, the Quran is recited in ten different reading traditions, whose linguistic details are mutually incompatible. This work uncovers the earliest linguistic layer of the Quran. It demonstrates that the text was composed in the Hijazi vernacular dialect, and that in the centuries that followed different reciters started to classicize the text to a new linguistic ideal, the ideal of the ʿarabiyyah. This study combines data from ancient Quranic manuscripts, the medieval Arabic grammarians and ample data from the Quranic reading traditions to arrive at new insights into the linguistic history of Quranic Arabic.

  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10632 - February 16, 2022, 11:12 AM

    I haven't read van Putten's book and am not able to evaluate it. He writes that the Quran comes from Hijaz. Does his work once and for all put an end to "revisionist" ideas that it emerged further north?


    I suppose this depends where the 'Hijazi' dialect is actually from and what evidence there is to connect it to a particular region. The Hijaz itself covers a big area and there wasn't necessarily just one dialect spoken there.
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10633 - February 16, 2022, 01:00 PM

    Quote
    Quranic Arabic
    From its Hijazi Origins to its Classical
    Reading Traditions


    Well, what is the Hijaz?
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10634 - February 16, 2022, 01:26 PM

    Well, what is the Hijaz?

    Oh my goodness .. that is a great Question   Cheesy Cheesy

    Marijn van Putten - BOOK LINK .....May be  that Leiden University   Marijn van Putten -  DOES NOT KNOW WHERE THAT HIJAZ REGION IS/WAS.  .. here is the map for him



    Did Quran come from that green place??

     Nonsense... 

    yes.. yes some words and some statements might have been added from there.. 

    Who knows Allah knows the best

    And HOW ARE YOU DOING DEAR ALTARA?? and here is the map for Marijn van Putten...


    Do not let silence become your legacy.. Question everything   
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10635 - February 16, 2022, 01:46 PM

    Hythem Sidky on Mythvision
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=neo3kxf0pCI
    Quote
    Dr. Sidky explains what the "qira'ah" reading traditions are as well as who determined what the canonical readings. Is there any truth to the idea that the companion of the prophet Muhammad, Ibn Mas'ud opposed the standard text of Uthman and continued to teach his own reading? What about evidence for resistance against Uthman's standard text from other companions or in other regions?

    https://chicago.academia.edu/HythemSidky

  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10636 - February 16, 2022, 02:10 PM

    Michael Penn - When Christians first met Muslims
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kzJojqPy7NQ
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10637 - February 16, 2022, 06:08 PM

    https://www.baytalfann.com/post/discovering-quranic-manuscripts-dr-éléonore-cellard
    Quote
    Dr. Eléonore Cellard is a specialist in Qur’ānic manuscripts. Her work incorporates fascinating Islamic scholarly traditions like traveling in search of knowledge "rihla fi talab al-‘ilm," and the spiritual power felt through working with relics and decoding what they symbolize.

    We talk to Eleonore about how her connection to Qur’anic studies began and an insight into a world of Qur'anic manuscripts.

  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10638 - February 17, 2022, 05:57 AM


    Hythem Sidky Is a great guy with great background...  More important than watching that video is   READING HIS PUBLICATIONS   Any one who is interested in origins of Quran and origins of Islam And Origins Islamism/Islamic political system (THESE THREE ARE DIFFERET THING.. DIFFERENT BEASTS)  must read these pubs from him...
     
    1. On the Regionality of Qurʾānic Codices

    2. One Muhammad or Many Muhammads? What Stylometry Can and Can't Tell Us About Quranic Authorship

    Most unfortunate thing is .. It appears he moved out of Science .. and  My strong suggestion to him  is .. DO NOT LEAVE YOUR OLD SUBJECT .. what you used to do....


    Do not let silence become your legacy.. Question everything   
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10639 - February 18, 2022, 12:13 AM

    Tommaso Tesei - Echoes of Pseudepigrapha in the Qur'ān

    https://www.academia.edu/45649786/_Echoes_of_Pseudepigrapha_in_the_Qurān_uncorrected_proofs_
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10640 - February 18, 2022, 12:36 AM

    Peter von Sivers - Islamic Origins: Anti-Theopaschism and Trisagion in the Near East in the early 600s

    https://www.academia.edu/48780282/Islamic_Origins_Anti_Theopaschism_and_Trisagion_in_the_Near_East_in_the_early_600s
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10641 - February 18, 2022, 12:43 AM

    Tommaso Tesei - Echoes of Pseudepigrapha in the Qur'ān

    Quote
    From the general (and incomplete) overview that I attempted to provide
    in this article it appears that stories, motifs, and possibly even books from
    the corpus of pseudepigraphical literature were known in the social and
    cultural context(s) from which the Qur’ān emerged.


    Yes. Therefore who knew that stuff ?

    Quote
    At the present stage of the investigation, determining how traditions from
    the pseudepigraphical corpus reached the original Qur’ān’s cradle is an
    unsolvable question.


    Nope. Suffice just to set aside the Muslim narrative and read the sources.

  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10642 - February 18, 2022, 12:50 AM

    Robert Hoyland- Sebeos, the Jews and the Rise of Islam
    https://www.academia.edu/3187911/Sebeos_the_Jews_and_the_Rise_of_Islam

    Interesting paper of Hoyland to which we can add all the work of Robin about Himyar.
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10643 - February 19, 2022, 01:15 AM

    New book

    Aaron Hughes - An Anxious Inheritance: Religious Others and the Shaping of Sunni Orthodoxy

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Anxious-Inheritance-Religious-Shaping-Orthodoxy-ebook/dp/B09QD2FKM2/ref=sr_1_10?qid=1645233121&refinements=p_27%3AAaron+W.+Hughes&s=books&sr=1-10
    Quote
    An Anxious Inheritance reveals the tensions between the early framers of Islam and the ever-expandable category of non-Muslims. Examining the encounter with these religious others, and showing how the Qur'an functioned as both a script to understand them and a map to classify them, this study traces the key role that these religious others played in what would ultimately emerge as (Sunni) orthodoxy. This orthodoxy would appear to be the natural outgrowth of the Prophet Muhammad's preaching, but it ultimately amounted to little more than a retroactive projection of later ideas onto the earliest period.

    Non-Muslims (among them Christians, Jews, Zoroastrians) and the "wrong" kinds of Muslims (e.g., the Shi'a) became integral--by virtue of their perceived stubbornness, infidelity, heresy, or the like--to the understanding of what true religion was not and, just as importantly, what it should be. These non-Muslims were rarely real individuals or groups; rather, they functioned as textual foils that could be conveniently orchestrated, and ultimately controlled, to facilitate Muslim self-definition. Without such religious others proper belief could, quite literally, not be articulated. Shedding new light on the early history of Islam, while also problematizing the binary of orthodoxy/heresy in the study of religion, An Anxious Inheritance makes significant contributions to a number of diverse academic fields.

  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10644 - February 19, 2022, 02:46 PM

    Robert Hoyland- Sebeos, the Jews and the Rise of Islam
    https://www.academia.edu/3187911/Sebeos_the_Jews_and_the_Rise_of_Islam

    Interesting paper of Hoyland to which we can add all the work of Robin about Himyar.

    Hello Alatra.. just curious., are you talking about this Christian Julien Robin work    from this book  ??



     7. THE JUDAISM OF THE ANCIENT KINGDOM OF ḤIMYAR IN ARABIA: A DISCREET CONVERSION
    Christian Julien Robin (CNRS, Membre de l’Institut)

    Do not let silence become your legacy.. Question everything   
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10645 - February 19, 2022, 09:08 PM

    Among other things. Check his Academia account.
    You can read the paper here :
    https://books.openedition.org/obp/19970?lang=fr
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10646 - February 20, 2022, 12:07 PM

    Thread from MVP: https://twitter.com/PhDniX/status/1495144534229065729?cxt=HHwWgoC5qYiC6b8pAAAA
    Quote
    Now that my monograph that I've worked on for the past years is finally out (and free for anyone to download!: https://brill.com/view/title/61587 ). I thought it would be nice to do a series of threads, writing accessible summaries on what my book is actually about. Today Chapter 1!

    So the main question my book sets out to answer is: "What is the language of the Quran?"
    There's an easy but unhelpful answer: "the language that you find in the Quran."
    But what kind of language is that? Obviously Arabic. What kind of Arabic? What were its linguistic features?

  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10647 - February 21, 2022, 08:41 AM

    Thread: https://twitter.com/sanawbar13/status/1495452923115020293
    Quote
    The book by the amazing @PhDniX has been released. check it out, it's open access!

    Since the book discusses old Hijazi, I feel it's appropriate for me to provide an introduction to modern Hijazi Arabic. because I rarely see it being mentioned.

    First, modern Hijazi Arabic isn't a single dialect, but a group of dialects that share a common geography (the Hijaz region) and it can be split into two types:

    1. Bedouin
    2. Sedentary (urban)

    The Bedouin type is comprised of multiple dialects that are part of a dialect continuum. The Sedentary type is spoken only in the cities of Mecca, Medina, Jeddah and to a smaller extent Taif.

    The speakers of the urban variety come from diverse backgrounds due to the long history of Muslim immigration to the holy cities. The origins of the urban variety is unclear.

    but it appears to be a form of different Arabic dialects mixing together, as it shares features and vocabulary found in Egyptian and Levantine Arabic.

    It is worth to point out that Modern Hijazi doesn't seem to share more features with Old Hijazi when compared to other Arabic dialects. Most of the old Hijazi features seem to have been lost due to time and immigration.

    https://twitter.com/PhDniX/status/1495458538352689158
    Quote from: MVP
    It's so mysterious to me how certain hijazi features so typical and central to the literary language like ذلك have totally disappeared not just from Hijazi but every single spoken dialect.

  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10648 - February 21, 2022, 09:22 PM

    Thread from MVP: https://twitter.com/PhDniX/status/1495859227495174144
    Quote
    To celebrate my book having come out last week, I'm doing somewhat less technical summaries as thread here on Twitter. Today we'll focus on Chapter 2: What is the ʿArabiyyah?

  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #10649 - February 22, 2022, 02:06 PM

    Al-Jallad
    The Damascus Psalm Fragment (the earliest Arabic text written in Greek letters)
    Free book
    https://www.academia.edu/43189829/Al_Jallad_2020_The_Damascus_Psalm_Fragment_Middle_Arabic_and_the_Legacy_of_Old_%E1%B8%A4ig%C4%81z%C4%AB_w_a_contribution_by_R_Vollandt

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