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Theme Changer

 Topic: 'Islamic State' a.k.a. ISIL

 (Read 227633 times)
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  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #780 - August 21, 2014, 01:44 PM

    I'm not surprised by the MCB's response, they only exist to serve Islamists and provide for them. Ironic that they blame the media for glamorising events, yet, I'm sure most of them (if not all) romanticise and glorify the caliphate, sharia etc.

    "Is God willing to prevent evil, but not able? Then he is not omnipotent.
     Is he able, but not willing? Then he is malevolent.
     Is he both able and willing? Then whence cometh evil?
     Is he neither able nor willing? Then why call him God." - Epicurus
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #781 - August 21, 2014, 01:54 PM

    well US of  A apparently paid the ransom in some cases..  I am curious about the list of people they released and the amount of money these rogues got paid..  is there any such published list? 


    No idea Yeezy, all I know is precedented cases I have seen in the news such as the Chandlers who were kidnapped by Somali Pirates.
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #782 - August 21, 2014, 02:16 PM

    Here is an interview from yesterday with Maajid Nawaz on CNN. It starts with a quote from MCB regarding the beheading of Foley. He talks about the UK situation.

    Clicky for video

    Danish Never-Moose adopted by the kind people on the CEMB-forum
    Ex-Muslim chat (Unaffliated with CEMB). Safari users: Use "#ex-muslims" as the channel name. CEMB chat thread.
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #783 - August 21, 2014, 02:29 PM

    Here is an interview from yesterday with Maajid Nawaz on CNN. It starts with a quote from MCB regarding the beheading of Foley. He talks about the UK situation.

    Clicky for video

     well  Maajid did a good job there..

    So where is that  Baby faced old lady  Baroness   who said  that David Cameron Government is in trouble because he is not supporting Minority view on some problem around the globe such as  somewhere in Gaza, Egypt, Somalia, Kashmir.. Baluchistan .. whatever ..... stupid bum..     She was  Baroness  for what   5?? 6 years??   DID SHE ANY TIME VISIT GAZA OR WEST BANK?

    Is she still  Baroness cashing monthly salary?? perks??

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #784 - August 21, 2014, 02:34 PM

    Here is an interview from yesterday with Maajid Nawaz on CNN. It starts with a quote from MCB regarding the beheading of Foley. He talks about the UK situation.

    Clicky for video


    Good man!

    Maajid is an amazing person!
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #785 - August 21, 2014, 02:40 PM

    And here in BBC some Crowley guy writes some nonsense with this heading   James Foley video not intended for US

    Quote
    As propaganda, the video seems to reinforce our understanding of the brutal protagonist now at the centre of the conflicts in Iraq and Syria. But the broader message the video delivers has potential strategic significance....

    But the video's primary target is actually the Muslim world, those who already explicitly or tacitly support the Islamic State or those, particularly westerners, who may be attracted to join the twin conflicts. The narrator (who has a British accent) says their group has been accepted by a larger number of Muslims worldwide.

    Crowley guy is using HIS CROW BRAIN TO WRITE THAT rubbish.. what Muslim world are you talking??  Muslim world in AMRRIKA and LONDON?  

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #786 - August 21, 2014, 04:24 PM

    *Behead unarmed journalist like a little bitch*
    *U.S. plans 12 more bombing runs*  dance
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #787 - August 21, 2014, 11:33 PM

    Saying "I f**king hate them" won't do any good.

    Man up, grab a gun and hold the line. If you don't, they will and don't think for once that wouldn't put 2 in your chest, and 1 in your dead if given the chance. The Yazidis and the Kurds have learned that the hard way.


    ^Is that what you are doing?

    Don't you hate what these lot stand for as well?

    Surely I can express my opinion? Yes you can call me a 'keyboard warrior' if you like. I am not a soldier, we have a professional army that takes care of our interests. If 'they' (ISIS) ever get here and our lives and security are in danger, then we all might have to pick up a rifle, but until then, I will have to leave it to brave and tough people like the Kurds who are better at this than I. What if I was a young woman or an old man, would I not be able to state my dislike unless I could go and 'do something about it'?


    I am better than your god......and so are you.

    "Is the man who buys a magic rock, really more gullible than the man who buys an invisible magic rock?.......,...... At least the first guy has a rock!"
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #788 - August 22, 2014, 12:55 AM

    ^ Mr. Superhero here is obviously already fighting with the Peshmerga.


    and you have a better idea? Tell us oh enlightened one.
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #789 - August 22, 2014, 12:56 AM

    ^Is that what you are doing?

    . I am not a soldier, we have a professional army that takes care of our interests.



    If everyone relies on someone else to take care of the problem, then there is no one left to actually solve the problem. You'd think if the Kurds relied on others, they'd still be alive today?
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #790 - August 22, 2014, 01:09 AM

    The Kurds are still in Northern Iraq because of the no fly zone, which threw a wrench into Anfal, which was going along swimmingly per Saddam's instructions. We have an entire generation of Kurds in that spot for whom oppression is a story their parents tell them.
    The Kurdish government admits when they need help, and they ask for it. This is a good trait. They are stretched too thin, even if they were fully armed. Their unsurpassed expertise cannot hold back ISIS. If it could, they would have just done it, and not asked for assistance at all. 
    Don't claim the Kurds have survived all alone. It is true that they are tenacious and resourceful and strong, but they have suffered horribly under oppressive regimes for many, many years, and also endured ghastly infighting that devastated their resources and domestic politics. They need support at times, as we all do.
    The world is interconnected. We all rely on each other, and no one knows this better than the Kurds, who are Sunni, Shia, Yezdi, Jewish and Atheist, and live under four governments in their homelands.

    Don't let Hitler have the street.
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #791 - August 22, 2014, 01:30 AM



    If everyone relies on someone else to take care of the problem, then there is no one left to actually solve the problem. You'd think if the Kurds relied on others, they'd still be alive today?


    Yes you are absolutely right, those who actually go and make the effort, risking their lives, are the ones who make the difference, and I admire them, they are doing something I am unable to, I cannot disagree with you.

    I don't know you personally or where you are right now, so it is possible that you are fighting ISIS and defending Erbil right now, and if you are then I fully respect you for your bravery and valour, and you would have, at the very least, my moral support.

    But even so, I can still hate what these zombies stand for, even if I am not actively involved in stopping it, I guess if my life depended on it, I would have to bite the bullet, but does that necessarily mean that everyone in the whole world have to pick up a rifle and trudge to Iraq in order to be justified in condemning the actions of these monsters?

    Anyway let's not make this thread a ding-dong between us two.There are much bigger matters under discussion.


    I am better than your god......and so are you.

    "Is the man who buys a magic rock, really more gullible than the man who buys an invisible magic rock?.......,...... At least the first guy has a rock!"
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #792 - August 22, 2014, 10:27 AM



    Quote
    US Launches New Barrage Of Airstrikes Against ISIS In Iraq Following Beheading Of American Journalist

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The United States launched a new barrage of airstrikes Wednesday against the Islamic State extremist group that beheaded American journalist James Foley and that has seized a swath of territory across Iraq and Syria. President Barack Obama vowed relentless pursuit of the terrorists and the White House revealed that the U.S. had launched a secret rescue mission inside Syria earlier this summer that failed to rescue Foley and other Americans still being held hostage.....


    Quote
    U.S. General Says Raiding Syria Is Key to Halting ISIS

    WASHINGTON — The Islamic State in Iraq and Syria cannot be defeated unless the United States or its partners take on the Sunni militants in Syria, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff said Thursday.

    “This is an organization that has an apocalyptic end-of-days strategic vision that will eventually have to be defeated,” said the chairman, Gen. Martin E. Dempsey, in his most expansive public remarks on the crisis since American airstrikes began in Iraq. “Can they be defeated without addressing that part of the organization that resides in Syria? The answer is no.”

    But General Dempsey and Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel, who both spoke at a Pentagon news conference, gave no indication that President Obama was about to approve airstrikes in Syria.

    Quote
    U.S. Drops Leaflets on Iraq's Mosul Urging Fight Against ISIS

    U.S. jets dropped leaflets on the militant-held Iraqi city of Mosul urging residents to stand up extremist fighters who overran it last month, an eyewitness told NBC News on Thursday. A photograph of one of the leaflets – written in Arabic and stamped by Iraq's Ministry of Defense – was also posted on two Twitter accounts believed to be linked to Iraqi authorities. They contained a message urging citizens to support security forces against the Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS), which was described as an "ignorant atheist expansion." The leaflets also said it was "time that we all stand together on the land of our sacred city."


    Hmmm., ......."ignorant atheist expansion." .........  But I like that LEAFLET WARS over those real wars..... anyways that is today's news....  and   this  http://www.washingtonpost.com/posteverything/wp/2014/08/21/even-islamist-fighters-in-syria-and-iraq-are-obsessing-over-ferguson/   is interesting....

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #793 - August 22, 2014, 01:54 PM

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TYvBpU_UwzI

    Dog! Traitor! - Islamists' Debate on ISIS and Hamas Turns into Exchange of Insults

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3BgCL6V32ZU

    ISIS is no one's representative, 15 July 2014   

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #794 - August 22, 2014, 02:54 PM

    At least 30 killed in attack on mosque in Iraq

    Quote
    BAGHDAD: At least 30 people were killed when a Muslim militia opened fired inside an Iraqi Sunni mosque in the country's eastern Diyala province on Friday, an Iraqi security source said. The security source said at least 30 bodies had arrived at the hospital in the city of Baquba in Diyala province.

    Witnesses said the death toll from the attack was higher, but it was not immediately possible to verify the reports. Such sectarian violence could hurt efforts by Iraq's new prime minister, moderate Shia Haider al-Abadi, to form a government that can unite Iraqis against Islamic State, the Sunni militants who have seized large parts of the country.

    Ambulances transported the bodies to the town of Baquba, the main town in Diyala province, where militias are powerful and act with impunity. Attacks on mosques are acutely sensitive and have in the past unleashed a deadly series of revenge killings and counter attacks in Iraq,

    That is the news today.. kill everyone and kill everywhere

    On that same news,  this news from aljazeera.com   August 22, 2014 8:15AM ET  says

    Quote
    At least 73 people have been killed after a Shia Muslim armed group opened fired inside an Iraqi Sunni mosque in the country's eastern Diyala province, medical sources have said.

    A security source said bodies had been arriving at the hospital in the city of Baquba in Diyala province on Friday.

    This is Shia thugs killing Sunnis in Mosques..

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #795 - August 22, 2014, 03:20 PM

    That should make the Sunnis opposed to ISIS feel safe or something...

    Danish Never-Moose adopted by the kind people on the CEMB-forum
    Ex-Muslim chat (Unaffliated with CEMB). Safari users: Use "#ex-muslims" as the channel name. CEMB chat thread.
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #796 - August 22, 2014, 03:30 PM

    *Behead unarmed journalist like a little bitch*
    *U.S. plans 12 more bombing runs*  dance


    I don't even understand what ISIS was thinking with the journalist's speech/execution. When have we ever even hesitated when there were hostages in Iraq? All that did was confirm that the involvement, though minor, was working. Of course we're going to come back harder once they held up that sign of weakness. What a foolish move on their part. The fact that they thought anyone would buy that speech, not to mention be swayed by it, is just a sign of their complete immaturity
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #797 - August 22, 2014, 04:06 PM

    http://www.niqash.org/articles/?id=3521&ang=en
    Quote
    On August 10 at around noon, an older woman arrived at a market in the centre of Mosul. She had bad back pain and it was also extremely warm. A bearded, heavily armed man got her attention and then asked her why she was not wearing a niqab, the traditional veil that covers almost the whole face, leaving only the eyes visible.
     
    “I tried but I just about suffocated in the summer heat,” the old lady said, not hiding her sarcasm.
     
    “So you will wear it in winter then?” the bearded man asked her, raising his voice because he thought she couldn’t hear him properly.
     
    “Is Daash even still going to be here in winter?,” the old lady asked, using the Arabic acronym for the Sunni Muslim extremist group formerly known as the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria, or ISIS – the group took control of the northern city in early June this year. She was making a joke – but her question also reflects the fact that the extremists, who now call themselves simply the Islamic State, or IS, are being forced to fight to maintain the territory they control.
     
    This story has been repeated often around Mosul – it’s considered a kind of peaceful popular protest against the restrictions that the IS group have put upon local women. Among other things, the IS fighters have forced women to completely cover themselves up. They must wear gloves and the niqab, rather than just a headscarf or hijab. Married women are supposed to wear a black niqab and unmarried women must wear a white niqab. Additionally women have been banned from working outside their homes – the only exceptions are obstetricians and nurses.
     
    Women were also instructed not to leave the house alone unless it was an emergency or they were accompanied by a male relative. The extremist group banned mixed classes at schools and universities and said that any violations of any of these rules were punishable by flogging.
     
    Most of the rules were part of Article 4 of the city charter the extremists formulated and distributed in Mosul. And the extremist group’s morality patrols, known as the Hisba Diwan, were responsible for ensuring that the rules were not violated. 
     
    The IS rules have seen women all but disappear from Mosul’s daily life. Their faces and voices have disappeared from schools, banks, government departments and from the city’s cultural, artistic and sporting life, as if they had never existed in a society that had always treated women with respect.
     
    A cloth merchant in Mosul told NIQASH that sales of his black and white fabric have increased dramatically. A lot of women are buying this cloth but generally they are not happy about it, the merchant, Ammar Abdullah, noted. “After buying fabric for herself and her three daughters, I heard one woman saying that no matter what they do, Daash will never turn Mosul into a village,” he said. By this she meant that villagers were backward and accepted the curtailment of women’s freedoms more readily whereas people in a big city like Mosul were better educated and more cosmopolitan.
     
    Over the past weeks, the IS group has set up checkpoints for vehicles travelling in the city. Part of their mission is to check that women are wearing the niqab. If a woman in any car is not, then the driver’s papers are confiscated and the driver must report to a building, formerly the headquarters of the local Youth and Sports department, in the Tayaran area of Mosul, where they would be investigated.
     
    Eye witnesses say they have also heard IS group members verbally abusing women who are not fully covered as they have instructed. Iraqi media, broadcasting from outside Mosul, have carried reports of this as well as reports that many local women are waiting for verdicts from the courts that the IS group has set up to carry out Sharia, or religious, jurisprudence.
     
    The niqab remains controversial in religious scholarship, with some saying it is prescribed by the Koran – even within various different sects there are several different descriptions of how women should cover themselves - and others saying it was a cultural adaptation in certain Islamic societies.
     
    “In Iraq, the niqab started to become more popular as a result of Saddam Hussein’s ‘Faith Campaign’,” says religious researcher, Mohammed Hashem. Hussein’s campaign really hit its stride in the mid-1990s when international sanctions on Iraq were at their worst. “In the 1960s and ‘70s, older women would cover their faces with a light veil but most of the younger women did not.”
     
    Hashem himself believes that the Koran never explicitly asks women to cover their faces. In fact, he says, during pilgrimage many female pilgrims do not cover their faces – and if this was a generally accepted custom, then surely, of all places, the women on pilgrimage would be asked to cover their faces. But, he argues, they are not. In fact Hashem believes that the IS group’s ruling about niqab in Mosul is a violation of the teachings of Islam.
     
    The wearing of the niqab is a product of male-dominated and regressive society, local writer Ahmad Hamadoun, argues. The niqab has existed for generations and it comes from an uncivilized, tribal way of thinking.
    Hamadoun also says he can’t rule out the fact that the IS fighters might use the niqab themselves as a disguise, when they feel their lives are at risk.
    Obviously the IS group is keen to maintain a good image. They quickly denied reports that they had ordered female genital mutilation on women in the areas they control in Iraq and Syria and they’ve accused secular media and individuals of trying to spread rumours about them.
     
    The IS group insist that having girls and boys mix at school is against their religion as is having women leave their homes unaccompanied, without a niqab on. They also deny that they would attack women for not adhering to their rules and beliefs.
     
    However realities on the ground indicate otherwise. The fate of a large group of women from the Yazidi ethno-religious group that IS fighters abducted remains unknown. And there has also been at least one woman attacked in Mosul.
     
    On August 13, a well-known female gynaecologist, Ghada Shafiq, who worked at Mosul’s General Hospital, was attacked by armed men as she left her home in the Tayaran neighbourhood that evening. She was stabbed to death.
     
    No motives for the attack have been declared. But the doctor’s colleagues say that she was targeted by the IS group because of an open letter she had allegedly written. The letter explained a strike that Mosul’s female doctors had been on since August 11.
     
    “Female doctors have continued to work in order to aid the sick and injured of Mosul, a city that is in a critical condition because of the IS’ control over the city, aerial bombardment and the fact that no salaries have been paid for weeks,” the letter, which was seen by NIQASH, said. “Those doctors could have left the city in order to protect their own lives and their families.”
     
    But they didn’t.
     
    Yet in return, the letter said, “the IS group has imposed the niqab on female doctors in hospitals, with fighters at hospital entrances in order to stop any female doctors coming or going unless they’re wearing the niqab and gloves. When women doctors tried to convince them that they couldn’t do their jobs and treat patients dressed like this, the IS men abused the doctors verbally and began threatening them.”
     
    The letter warned against yielding to these kinds of decisions made by the IS group because accepting their rules was the top of a slippery slope – it meant possible acceptance of later decisions that might be made by the IS leaders, such as those concerning genital mutilation and forced marriages to fighters.
     
    The insistence on things like the niqab was in order to degrade women and that is why the doctors had started their strike, the letter explained: so that women’s voices would be heard. “Does Islam require believers to abuse and harass women in the streets?” the letter asked. “Is this behaviour part of the teachings of Islam?”
     
    For asking those questions, the doctor paid with her life.

  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #798 - August 22, 2014, 04:09 PM

    good article

    The Fathers of ISIS

    Quote
    The organization abbreviated as ISIS (Islamic State in Iraq and Syria) is not new in the region, nor is it a newfound expression of the crises afflicting Arab societies at a moment of profound transformations, initiated by 2011 revolutions.
    To the contrary, ISIS is the offspring of more than one father, and the product of more than one longstanding and widespread sickness. The organization’s explosive growth today is in fact the result of previously existing, worsening conflicts that were caused by the different fathers.

    ISIS is first the child of despotism in the most heinous form that has plagued the region. Therefore, it is no coincidence that we see its base, its source of strength concentrated in Iraq and Syria, where Saddam Hussein and Hafez and Bashar Al-Assad reigned for decades, killing hundreds of thousands of people, destroying political life, and deepening sectarianism by transforming it into a mechanism of exclusion and polarization, to the point that injustices and crimes against humanity became commonplace.

    ISIS is second the progeny of the American invasion of Iraq in 2003, both the way in which it was initially conducted and the catastrophic mismanagement that followed. Specifically, it was the exclusion of a wide swath of Iraqis from post invasion political processes and the formation of a new authority that discriminated against them and held them collectively at fault for the guilt of Saddam and his party, which together enabled groups (such as those first established by Abu Musab al-Zarqawi) whose activities have been resumed by ISIS to get in touch with some parts of Iraqi society and to establish itself among them.

    ISIS is third the son of Iranian aggressive regional policies that have worsened in recent years — taking Iraq, Lebanon, and Syria as its backyard, feeding (directly or indirectly) confessional divisions and making these divides the backbone of ideological mobilization and a policy of revenge and retaliation that has constructed a destructive feedback loop.



    ISIS is fourth the child of some of the Salafist networks in the Gulf (in Saudi Arabia and other states), which emerged and developed throughout the 1980s, following the oil boom and the “Afghan jihad”. These networks have continued to operate and expand throughout the last two decades under various names, all in the interest of extremism and obscurantism.

    ISIS is fifth the offspring of a profound crisis, deeply rooted in the thinking of some Islamist groups seeking to escape from their terrible failure to confront the challenges of the present toward a delusional model ostensibly taken from the seventh century, believing that they have found within its imaginary folds the answer to all contemporary or future questions.

    ISIS is sixth the progeny of violence, or of an environment that has been subjected to striking brutality, which has allowed the growth of this disease and facilitated the emergence of what could be called “ISISism”. Like Iraq previously, Syria today has been abandoned beneath explosive barrels to become a laboratory, a testing ground for violence, daily massacres and their outcomes.

    ISIS, an abominable, savage creature, is thus the product of at least these six fathers. Its persistency depends on the continuation of these aforementioned elements, particularly the element of violence embodied by the Assad regime in Syria. Those who think that they should be impartial toward or even support tyrants like Assad in the fight against ISISism fail to realize that his regime is in fact at the root of the problem.

    Until this fact is recognized — that despotism is the disease and not the cure — we can only expect more deadly repercussions, from the Middle East to the distant corners of the globe…

    http://vendredis-arabes.blogspot.co.uk/2014/08/fathers-of-isis.html?spref=tw



    "we can smell traitors and country haters"


    God is Love.
    Love is Blind. Stevie Wonder is blind. Therefore, Stevie Wonder is God.

  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #799 - August 22, 2014, 04:13 PM

    Ghada Shafiq - You brave woman!

    Amazing story and such an inspiration.

    The sods are the ones that killed her!

    Quote
    The insistence on things like the niqab was in order to degrade women and that is why the doctors had started their strike, the letter explained: so that women’s voices would be heard. “Does Islam require believers to abuse and harass women in the streets?” the letter asked. “Is this behaviour part of the teachings of Islam?”


    Good questions and I hope it strikes debate in Muslim communities across the world!
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #800 - August 22, 2014, 04:28 PM

    No end in sight for Islamic State’s attack on Iraq

    Quote
    The conflict in Iraq is usually depicted as exclusively involving the Shiite government and Sunni armed groups. However, this stereotype is shattered when observing the situation of Sunnis in areas controlled by the Islamic State (IS).

    One quarter of Mosul’s residents have fled the Sunni-dominated city. Moreover, hundreds of Sunnis were killed by IS. Considering this, the conflict can be seen in a different way, since these practices are equally carried out in the Syrian and Iraqi areas controlled by IS.

    In the Syrian city of Deir ez-Zor, adjacent to the Iraqi border, the organization has killed in the past two weeks more than 700 individuals belonging to a Sunni tribe, the majority of whom were civilians. The Syrian Observatory for Human Rights announced that 17 fighters of other Sunni opposition factions were beheaded at the hands of IS in the village of Akhtarin, which fell under the control of the organization.

    In Iraq, the Sunni town of Haditha in Anbar has been fighting off the successive attacks of IS for more than a month. A source in the city told Al-Monitor by phone: “The residents of Haditha are moderate and do not agree with the terrorist doctrine of IS. They are sacrificing all they have to preserve their cities from the monsters of this organization.”

    It seems to be a trend. Upon entering a city, IS looks for Sunni oppositionists and exterminates them. This includes whoever works or cooperates with Sahwa (Awakening) and state forces, in addition to clerics, preachers and imams who prohibit the joining of the organization and consider its practices to be religiously illegitimate.

    Such aggressive behavior is based on the extremist Salafist doctrine of the organization that does not differentiate between Shiites and Sunnis who do not abide by the Salafist school of thought. Both, according to this narrow vision, are considered apostates. Even other Salafist doctrines, such as Wahhabism, which is Saudi Arabia’s dominant faith, fall under this category. IS believes that Wahhabism has deviated from the right path of Salafism, and that the political and religious rules in Saudi Arabia are illegitimate. This is why Saudi Arabia’s Grand Mufti Sheikh Abdulaziz Al al-Sheikh issued a statement on Aug. 9 branding the “Islamic State and al-Qaeda apostates,” and calling on all Muslims to unite to fight this extreme doctrine.

    Many displaced Sunnis have found refuge in Shiite cities in southern Iraq. The city of Nasiriyah hosted scores of Sunni families that came from Mosul after it fell under the control of IS. A Red Crescent source in the city told Al-Monitor: “The displaced belong to different religions, sects and ethnic groups. So, their belonging is not the reason behind their displacement and it does not affect the services provided to them by governmental and civil organizations. All Iraqis are threatened by the most dangerous terrorist organization in the world.”

    Al-Monitor spotted Sunni Iraqis performing their daily prayers in the Shiite holy shrines of Karbala and Najaf. This is considered normal in these areas, in which religious tolerance prevails. Many families in the Shiite cities that are close to Sunni areas, like Karbala and Najaf, are related to Sunnis in Sunni areas like Anbar.

    Iraq is witnessing a crime against humanity performed by an international terrorist organization against all Iraqi components, including the Sunnis who historically do not follow the extremist Salafist doctrine. Regional and international political circles, in their attempts to carry out political agendas in Syria and Iraq, offered broad aid to IS, contributing to the inception and empowerment of this terrorist organization. IS has thus become a regional and international threat putting every country at risk. With the indecisive stance of the international community toward fighting IS, the likelihood of its remaining in the region for a long time is high. Therefore, crimes and massacres against religious minorities, as well as other components, will continue uninterrupted.


    Danish Never-Moose adopted by the kind people on the CEMB-forum
    Ex-Muslim chat (Unaffliated with CEMB). Safari users: Use "#ex-muslims" as the channel name. CEMB chat thread.
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #801 - August 22, 2014, 04:31 PM

    Ghada Shafiq - You brave woman!

    Amazing story and such an inspiration.

    The sods are the ones that killed her!

    Good questions and I hope it strikes debate in Muslim communities across the world!


    To me it seems like the common Muslims are big on that it all is a Zionist/Western conspiracy to control the Arabs and make Islam and Muslims look bad. Everyone knows that Al-Baghdadi is a Jew named Shimon Elliott. Edward Snowden said that. It is on the Internet. That BBC and CNN don't write it just proves it is true.

    Danish Never-Moose adopted by the kind people on the CEMB-forum
    Ex-Muslim chat (Unaffliated with CEMB). Safari users: Use "#ex-muslims" as the channel name. CEMB chat thread.
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #802 - August 22, 2014, 04:48 PM

    Are you being serious Nikolaj?
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #803 - August 22, 2014, 04:55 PM

    Depends on what part you mean Tongue

    I just see that conspiracy theory that ISIS is created by Israel often with the addition that Al-Baghdadi either was trained by Israel OR that he is actually a Jew named Shimon Elliott being shared on the Internet again and again by Muslims.

    It was also repeated by another ethnic Dane I spoke to at the anti-ISIS march last Sunday.

    I get worried when I meed conspiracy theories from the Internet offline idiot2

    I don't believe any of that, of course.

    Danish Never-Moose adopted by the kind people on the CEMB-forum
    Ex-Muslim chat (Unaffliated with CEMB). Safari users: Use "#ex-muslims" as the channel name. CEMB chat thread.
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #804 - August 22, 2014, 06:41 PM

    Are you being serious Nikolaj?


    Here is one link that makes that claim.

    http://aanirfan.blogspot.co.uk/2014/08/isis-run-by-simon-elliot-mossad-agent.html

    Just check out those eyebrows in the photo. Photoshopped?  Huh?

    I am better than your god......and so are you.

    "Is the man who buys a magic rock, really more gullible than the man who buys an invisible magic rock?.......,...... At least the first guy has a rock!"
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #805 - August 22, 2014, 07:13 PM

    I don't know if this is actually true, sounds a bit iffy to me, and it could be Western counter-propaganda, but nothing surprises me these days.

    "In Raqqa, Syria, (where ISIS are in charge) at livestock markets, the hindquarters of goats and sheep must be covered in order to prevent men from viewing their genitalia and having uncomely thoughts."


    http://www.spiegel.de/international/world/how-islamic-state-fighters-pose-a-threat-to-the-world-a-986632.html

    WTF?Huh?!!!!!!  Huh?

    I am better than your god......and so are you.

    "Is the man who buys a magic rock, really more gullible than the man who buys an invisible magic rock?.......,...... At least the first guy has a rock!"
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #806 - August 22, 2014, 07:22 PM

    Here is one link that makes that claim.

    http://aanirfan.blogspot.co.uk/2014/08/isis-run-by-simon-elliot-mossad-agent.html

    Just check out those eyebrows in the photo. Photoshopped?  Huh?


    ISIS IS RUN BY SIMON ELLIOT, A MOSSAD AGENT


    Quote
    Simon Elliot, aka Al-Baghdadi, son of Jewish parents, Mossad agent.

    According to Edward Snowden, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, the boss of ISIL (aka ISIS),  is a Jewish actor named Simon Elliot.

    French Report ISIL Leader Mossad Agent / Simon Elliot, alias Al-Baghdadi, de père et mère juifs

    Simon Elliot (aka Elliot Shimon aka Al-Baghdadi) has Jewish parents.

    Simon Elliot, having been recruited by Mossad, was trained in espionage and psychological warfare.

    The best known examples of Jews running 'Moslem' terror organisations are Osama bin Laden and Ayman al-Zawahiri.


    Not just Simon Elliot, aka Al-Baghdadi, ., All Muslim of Middle east should know that they were once   son/daughters of Jews....

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #807 - August 22, 2014, 07:43 PM

    Here is one link that makes that claim.

    http://aanirfan.blogspot.co.uk/2014/08/isis-run-by-simon-elliot-mossad-agent.html

    Just check out those eyebrows in the photo. Photoshopped?  Huh?


    Dunno, he kind of does look like him a bit.

    I am better than your god......and so are you.

    "Is the man who buys a magic rock, really more gullible than the man who buys an invisible magic rock?.......,...... At least the first guy has a rock!"
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #808 - August 22, 2014, 07:44 PM

    ISIS IS RUN BY SIMON ELLIOT, A MOSSAD AGENT
    (Clicky for piccy!)

    Not just Simon Elliot, aka Al-Baghdadi, ., All Muslim of Middle east should know that they were once   son/daughters of Jews....


    Does it look like someone snorting cocaine in the bottom left corner of that photo?

    I am better than your god......and so are you.

    "Is the man who buys a magic rock, really more gullible than the man who buys an invisible magic rock?.......,...... At least the first guy has a rock!"
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #809 - August 22, 2014, 07:50 PM

    Nah just looks like someone holding a cig

    My mind runs, I can never catch it even if I get a head start.
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