Skip navigation
Sidebar -

Advanced search options →

Welcome

Welcome to CEMB forum.
Please login or register. Did you miss your activation email?

Donations

Help keep the Forum going!
Click on Kitty to donate:

Kitty is lost

Recent Posts


NayaPakistan...New Pakist...
Yesterday at 09:36 PM

'Islamic State' a.k.a. IS...
by zeca
Yesterday at 07:47 PM

Freely down loadable Boo...
Yesterday at 06:55 PM

Qur'anic studies today
Yesterday at 06:47 PM

Catalan protests
Yesterday at 06:06 PM

Excellence and uniqueness
Yesterday at 12:15 PM

Neo prounouns & facism
October 13, 2019, 10:35 PM

New tunisian prez
October 13, 2019, 09:24 PM

Kyrgyzstan and islamisati...
October 13, 2019, 01:36 PM

Kashmir endgame
October 12, 2019, 11:24 AM

5 strongest arguments aga...
October 11, 2019, 08:47 AM

The Battle for British Is...
October 11, 2019, 12:34 AM

Theme Changer

 Topic: 'Islamic State' a.k.a. ISIL

 (Read 229408 times)
  • Previous page 1 ... 13 14 1516 17 ... 78 Next page « Previous thread | Next thread »
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #420 - July 24, 2014, 09:39 PM

    with respect Nergal, that kind of conspiracy theorising about Obama being Muslim is absurd

    "we can smell traitors and country haters"


    God is Love.
    Love is Blind. Stevie Wonder is blind. Therefore, Stevie Wonder is God.

  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #421 - July 24, 2014, 09:42 PM

    That's right. He's a secret jew, which we know because he hasn't sent in the troops to overthrow Israel and help the Palestinians. Silly people thinking he's a secret muslims for not sending troops to overthrow ISIS.

    `But I don't want to go among mad people,' Alice remarked.
     `Oh, you can't help that,' said the Cat: `we're all mad here. I'm mad.  You're mad.'
     `How do you know I'm mad?' said Alice.
     `You must be,' said the Cat, `or you wouldn't have come here.'
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #422 - July 24, 2014, 09:52 PM

    Life in a Jihadist Capital: Order With a Darker Side

    Quote
    In a Syrian City, ISIS Puts Its Vision Into Practice

    RAQQA, Syria — When his factory was bombed in the northern Syrian city of Aleppo, the businessman considered two bleak options: remain at home and risk dying in the next airstrike, or flee like hundreds of thousands of others to a refugee camp in Turkey.

    Instead, he took his remaining cash east and moved to a neighboring city, Raqqa, the de facto capital of the world’s fastest growing jihadist force. There he found a degree of order and security absent in other parts of Syria.

    “The fighting in Syria will continue, so we have to live our lives,” said the businessman, who gave only a first name, Qadri, as he oversaw a dozen workers in his new children’s clothing factory in Raqqa.

    Long before extremists rolled through Iraq and seized a large piece of territory, the group known as the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria, or ISIS, took over most of Raqqa Province, home to about a million people, and established a headquarters in its capital. Through strategic management and brute force, the group, which now calls itself simply the Islamic State, has begun imposing its vision of a state that blends its fundamentalist interpretation of Islam with the practicalities of governance.

    In time, it has won the surprising respect of some war-weary citizens, like Qadri, who will accept any authority that can restore a semblance of normal life. Rebel-held areas of Aleppo, by comparison, remain racked with food shortages and crime. But there is a darker side to Islamic rule, with public executions and strict social codes that have left many in this once-tolerant community deeply worried about the future.

    In the city of Raqqa, traffic police officers keep intersections clear, crime is rare, and tax collectors issue receipts. But statues like the landmark lions in Al Rasheed Park have been destroyed because they were considered blasphemous. Public spaces like Al Amasy Square, where young men and women once hung out and flirted in the evenings, have been walled off with heavy metal fences topped with the black flags of ISIS. People accused of stealing have lost their hands in public amputations.



    “What I see in Raqqa proves that the Islamic State has a clear vision to establish a state in the real meaning of the word,” said a retired teacher in the city of Raqqa. “It is not a joke.”

    How ISIS rules in Raqqa offers insight into what it is trying to do as it moves to consolidate its grip in territories spanning the Syrian-Iraqi border. An employee of The New York Times recently spent six days in Raqqa and interviewed a dozen residents. The employee and those interviewed are not being identified to protect them from retaliation by the extremists who have hunted down and killed those perceived as opposing their project.

    To those entering Raqqa, ISIS makes clear, immediately, who is in charge.

    At the southern entrance to the city, visitors were once greeted by a towering mosaic of President Bashar al-Assad and Haroun al-Rasheed, the caliph who ruled the Islamic world from Raqqa in the ninth century. Now there is a towering black billboard that pays homage to ISIS and to the so-called martyrs who died fighting for its cause.

    Raqqa’s City Hall houses the Islamic Services Commission. The former office of the Finance Ministry contains the Shariah court and the criminal police. The traffic police are based in the First Shariah High School. Raqqa’s Credit Bank is now the tax authority, where employees collect $20 every two months from shop owners for electricity, water and security. Many said that they had received official receipts stamped with the ISIS logo and that the fees were less than they used to pay in bribes to Mr. Assad’s government.

    “I feel like I am dealing with a respected state, not thugs,” said a Raqqa goldsmith in his small shop as a woman shopped for gold pieces with cash sent from abroad by her husband.

    Raqqa is a test case for ISIS, which imposed itself as the ultimate authority in this city on the Euphrates River early this year. The group has already proved its military prowess, routing other militias in Syria as well as the Iraqi military. But it is here in this agricultural hub that it has had the most time to turn its ideology into reality, a project that appears unlikely to end soon given the lack of a military force able to displace it.

    An aid worker who travels to Raqqa said the ranks of ISIS were filled with volatile young men, many of them foreigners more interested in violence than governance. To keep things running, it has paid or threatened skilled workers to remain in their posts while putting loyalist supervisors over them to ensure compliance with Islamic rules.

    “They can’t fire all the staff and bring new people to run a hospital, so they change the manager to someone who will enforce their rules and regulations,” the aid worker said, speaking on the condition of anonymity so as not to endanger his work.

    Raqqa’s three churches, once home to an active Christian minority, have all been shuttered. After capturing the largest, the Armenian Catholic Martyrs Church, ISIS removed its crosses, hung black flags from its facade and converted it into an Islamic center that screens videos of battles and suicide operations to recruit new fighters.

    The few Christians who remain pay a minority tax of a few dollars per month. When ISIS’s religious police officers patrol to make sure shops close during Muslim prayers, the Christians must obey, too.

    The religious police have banned public smoking of cigarettes and water pipes — a move that has dampened the city’s social life, forcing cafes to close. They also make sure that women cover their hair and faces in public.

    A university professor from Raqqa said ISIS gunmen recently stopped a bus heading to Damascus when they found one woman on board insufficiently covered. They held the bus up for an hour and a half until she went home and changed, the professor said.

    More pragmatically, ISIS has managed to keep food in markets, and bakeries and gas stations functioning. But it has had more trouble with drinking water and electricity, which is out for as much as 20 hours a day.

    Perhaps realizing that the young extremists most attracted to its sectarian violence lack professional skills, the leader of ISIS, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, asked in a recent audio address for doctors and engineers to travel to places like Raqqa to help build his newly declared Islamic State. “Their migration is an obligation so that they can answer the dire need of the Muslims,” Mr. Baghdadi said.

    Hints of this international mobilization are already apparent in Raqqa, where gunmen at checkpoints are often Saudi, Egyptian, Tunisian or Libyan. Raqqa’s emir of electricity is Sudanese, and one hospital is run by a Jordanian who reports to an Egyptian boss, according to Syrians who work under them.

    After ISIS’s advance into Iraq last month, the Jordanian went to Mosul to help organize a hospital there before returning to Raqqa.

    “He talked with an eager shine in his eyes, saying that the caliphate of the Islamic State that began in Raqqa would spread over the whole region,” one of his employees said.


    `But I don't want to go among mad people,' Alice remarked.
     `Oh, you can't help that,' said the Cat: `we're all mad here. I'm mad.  You're mad.'
     `How do you know I'm mad?' said Alice.
     `You must be,' said the Cat, `or you wouldn't have come here.'
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #423 - July 24, 2014, 10:10 PM

    After being the majority in Levant and forming significant portion of Iraq and Egypt, I believe eastern Christianity is doomed. This community will be represented by monks and few people to serve the holy places, maybe some Coptics will stay in Egypt's rural areas and Maronites in Beqa' and Mt. Lebanon, the rest will go west, this was once a rich and prospering community in Aleppo, Damascus, Beirut, Cairo, Alexandria, Jerusalem, Baghdad and Haifa, blow after blow by Ottomans, British, Jewish, Christian themselves in Lebanon, and garden variety of local fundamental nuts did a great job.
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #424 - July 25, 2014, 01:53 AM

    It seems like ISIS/IS are claiming to have defeated the strongest division withing Syrian army. Any victory of theirs is a loss for minorities and women... These guys are eager to go to war but unwilling to debate evidence for or against Islam. Also when reading them online, its really gets difficult with all the beheadings, there was one picture that was so repugnant that I don't really understand the point of it. Its just absolutely sick.
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #425 - July 25, 2014, 02:06 AM

    That's right. He's a secret jew, which we know because he hasn't sent in the troops to overthrow Israel and help the Palestinians. Silly people thinking he's a secret muslims for not sending troops to overthrow ISIS.


    I thought he was Illuminati. Because he never talks about them. What is he hiding?

    Don't let Hitler have the street.
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #426 - July 25, 2014, 02:26 AM

    It's starting to make sense. Oh, that sneaky illuminati jewish muslim rat! Probably an atheist as well. Only atheists would encourage America to be ruled by sharia.

    `But I don't want to go among mad people,' Alice remarked.
     `Oh, you can't help that,' said the Cat: `we're all mad here. I'm mad.  You're mad.'
     `How do you know I'm mad?' said Alice.
     `You must be,' said the Cat, `or you wouldn't have come here.'
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #427 - July 25, 2014, 02:58 AM

    If he listens to polka, it is all over. Nothing is as it seems.

    Don't let Hitler have the street.
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #428 - July 25, 2014, 03:36 PM

    How could you forget to mention his socialism? He even admitted it!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WPwsdGBqQpI
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #429 - July 25, 2014, 03:40 PM

    Quote
    An aid worker who travels to Raqqa said the ranks of ISIS were filled with volatile young men, many of them foreigners more interested in violence than governance. To keep things running, it has paid or threatened skilled workers to remain in their posts while putting loyalist supervisors over them to ensure compliance with Islamic rules.


    Quote
    Perhaps realizing that the young extremists most attracted to its sectarian violence lack professional skills, the leader of ISIS, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, asked in a recent audio address for doctors and engineers to travel to places like Raqqa to help build his newly declared Islamic State. “Their migration is an obligation so that they can answer the dire need of the Muslims,” Mr. Baghdadi said.

    Who would've thought deranged sociopaths who rushed to a war zone hungry for martyrdom and the heads of infidels would have trouble actually governing?
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #430 - July 29, 2014, 01:34 AM

    http://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/news/world-news/syrian-and-turkish-kurds-unite-we-shoot-isis-fighters-like-sheep-but-next-day-double-the-number-return-30466358.html

    Kurdistan has become the wall. I heard Obama denied a request from Kurds for assistance. Why does the US shower Kurdistan with promises of aid in good times and when their backs are to the wall they refuse everything? This is my general impression.

    Don't let Hitler have the street.
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #431 - July 29, 2014, 10:15 AM

    Perhaps they don't want to alienate Turkey? The U.S. has a history of stabbing the Iraqi Kurds in the back. 
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #432 - July 29, 2014, 11:38 AM

    Turkey is going to have to get over it, now. PKK is defending their border.

    Don't let Hitler have the street.
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #433 - July 30, 2014, 08:51 AM

    Quote
    SYDNEY: Australia has issued arrest warrants for two men suspected of fighting alongside militants in Iraq and Syria, police said Wednesday, including one who reportedly posed with severed heads.

    The Australian Federal Police said warrants had been issued for two former Sydney men, Mohamed Elomar and Khaled Sharrouf, who have reportedly joined the Islamic State (IS) jihadist group fighters. “The warrants relate to alleged terrorism related activity,” a police spokeswoman said.

    "Should Sharrouf or Elomar return to Australia, these warrants authorise law enforcement to arrest them immediately."

    The federal police said they were unable to comment further, given the matter was yet to be tested in court.

    But reports said that Elomar had posted photos of himself online posing with the severed heads of Syrian government soldiers thought to have died in recent fighting in the northern province of Raqa, where militants from IS seized an army base.

    "Those photographs, if they were authentic, were of course abominable," Attorney-General George Brandis told the Australian Broadcasting Corporation late Tuesday.

    "If they were authentic what they demonstrated was this man's participation in, and in fact promotion of violent crimes, probably war crimes."

    Australia has expressed deep concern that about 150 Australians, some of them dual nationals, were learning the “terrorist trade” fighting alongside Sunni militants in Iraq and Syria.

    The government has confirmed that two Australians, including an 18-year-old, have already been behind deadly suicide bombings in the Iraq and Syria conflicts, without providing further details.

    “The one thing no Australian should ever think is that this is a problem that exists on the other side of the world,” Brandis said Tuesday.

    "Because while it may take shape on the other side of the world, the number of Australians who are participating in this war fighting in Syria and Iraq shows that this is a problem that exists and germinates within our suburbs, within the suburbs of Sydney and Melbourne and Brisbane."

    Prime Minister Tony Abbott Wednesday issued a warning against citizens going abroad “to fight in other people's wars”.

     that is what news says at http://www.dawn.com/news/1122351/arrest-warrants-for-australian-militants-suspected-of-joining-is

    and these are the heroes of Islam


    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #434 - July 30, 2014, 09:39 AM

    It's like Muslims are slowly starting to realise that the global jihad is their biggest enemy but simply can't accept that their oppressors are Muslims motivated by Islamic ideology. They stick their fingers in their ears and yell "it's all a foreign infidel plot!". 
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #435 - July 30, 2014, 09:45 AM

    Well that's good news.

    Quote from: ZooBear 

    • Surah Al-Fil: In an epic game of Angry Birds, Allah uses birds (that drop pebbles) to destroy an army riding elephants whose intentions were to destroy the Kaaba. No one has beaten the high score.

  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #436 - July 30, 2014, 09:49 AM

    Foreign plot is exactly how I see it as an Iraqi, hate seeing how they're destroying local beautiful buildings. If they're so brave, go to Palestine and help your brothers instead of bombing Iraqi mosques. Go to Gaza you cowards.

    Quote from: ZooBear 

    • Surah Al-Fil: In an epic game of Angry Birds, Allah uses birds (that drop pebbles) to destroy an army riding elephants whose intentions were to destroy the Kaaba. No one has beaten the high score.

  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #437 - July 30, 2014, 10:02 AM

    Well yeah, "foreign" in the sense that they're a band of nutters from outside Iraq/Syria (Chechnya, Europe, Libya, KSA, etc). They don't recognise borders, nationalities, etc. It's all "ard-ullah". Not "foreign" as in infidels. 
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #438 - July 30, 2014, 10:10 AM

    Yeah I see it from the eyes of an actual Iraqi. Which makes me hate even more the perspective that non Iraqi muslims have that Iraq would make a good Muslim nation. No, take your Muslim nation and shove it. It's a personal matter for me.

    Quote from: ZooBear 

    • Surah Al-Fil: In an epic game of Angry Birds, Allah uses birds (that drop pebbles) to destroy an army riding elephants whose intentions were to destroy the Kaaba. No one has beaten the high score.

  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #439 - July 30, 2014, 10:18 AM

    I can understand that. I'd be raging too. The videos I've seen of the stuff these crackpots do to native Syrian fighters/civilians gave me the feeling that they're essentially a foreign invading army there. It's Islamist imperialism.

    I still remember Baghdadi's statement the day the caliphate was declared that "Syria doesn't belong to the Syrians. Iraq doesn't belong to the Iraqis". Fucking arseholes. 
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #440 - July 30, 2014, 11:14 AM

    Yeah I see it from the eyes of an actual Iraqi. Which makes me hate even more the perspective that non Iraqi muslims have that Iraq would make a good Muslim nation. No, take your Muslim nation and shove it. It's a personal matter for me.


    I read a report on ISIS fighters from Europe in Syria last year some time. The Syrian people already having to face the horrors of Assad now had to put up with these jihadis. Basically these British and European jihadis treated Syrians as ungrateful peasants, who should be thankful to them for coming all the way to rescue them from their godlessness. The attitude was complete arrogance and imperialistic.

    "we can smell traitors and country haters"


    God is Love.
    Love is Blind. Stevie Wonder is blind. Therefore, Stevie Wonder is God.

  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #441 - July 30, 2014, 11:17 AM

    Jesus wept. British jihadi describing 'miracles' during battles

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pK82z1s1PLc&feature=youtu.be

    "we can smell traitors and country haters"


    God is Love.
    Love is Blind. Stevie Wonder is blind. Therefore, Stevie Wonder is God.

  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #442 - July 30, 2014, 11:51 AM

    Jesus wept. British jihadi describing 'miracles' during battles

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pK82z1s1PLc&feature=youtu.be


    Hmmm... did the angels defeat the enemy for them then? Apparently not. Not a particularly good miracle then - as miracles go  grin12
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #443 - July 30, 2014, 12:03 PM

    http://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/news/world-news/syrian-and-turkish-kurds-unite-we-shoot-isis-fighters-like-sheep-but-next-day-double-the-number-return-30466358.html

    Kurdistan has become the wall. I heard Obama denied a request from Kurds for assistance. Why does the US shower Kurdistan with promises of aid in good times and when their backs are to the wall they refuse everything? This is my general impression.


    It is US policy. When the sectarian violence started during the Iraq occupation the policy was to maintain the status-quo of the Iraqi nation. They bribed anyone they could, 450 million dollars worth, to side with the occupation. The government realized that there were few who supported any unified nation so they found the unknown Maliki , put him in power and crossed their fingers. Of course once the occupation ended Maliki began purging Sunni from every position of authority he could. This actually crippled the Iraqi military and we see the results of his policy. The USA is the last to admit they screwed up so it is better to beat a dead horse into action. The USA's own self-image is more important than lives lost.
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #444 - July 30, 2014, 12:26 PM

    Quote
    Jesus wept. British jihadi describing 'miracles' during battles

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pK82z1s1PLc&feature=youtu.be

    Hmmm... did the angels defeat the enemy for them then? Apparently not. Not a particularly good miracle then - as miracles go  grin12


    That rascal must have transported some drugs from  his hometown ., must be the effect of Crystal Meth from London..

    AMRIKA is smart .,  support rascals create Al Qaeda .. ISIS.. bokodokoo............ whatever....  and  and move these ISLAMIC IDIOTS  from west to those organizations .  I am sure they put the moles in  these groups also Tag them so when they come back they monitor them every day..

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #445 - July 30, 2014, 02:15 PM

    I don't think it would've been feasible for the U.S. to split Iraq. Most Iraqis were (are?) firmly against partition. It would've led to accusations of colonialist divide and conquer strategies being implemented by the U.S. And the Sunnis -- the most violent and reactionary of the three blocs -- would've ended up with no oil. That wouldn't have ended well. 

    They should've just stayed the fuck out of Iraq, lifted most of the sanctions (should never have implemented the most prohibitive ones at all) by the time the military and the Iraqi state had been sufficiently weakened and covertly supported (or at least paid lip service to) secular democratic groups. Of course, I'm basing this strategy on the laughable assumption that America is actually interested in democracy in the Middle East, and that Iraqi lives were worth more to Cheney and co. than assorted corporate interests that profited from the war. 
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #446 - August 01, 2014, 02:00 PM

     At least 10 people were killed and 29 wounded Friday in bomb blasts that struck two districts of Baghdad says news..

    Off course they are Shia districts



    Quote


    BAGHDAD: At least 10 people were killed and 29 wounded Friday in bomb blasts that struck two districts of Baghdad, police and hospital sources said.

    The deadliest was a car bomb in the northern Shia neighbourhood of Sadr City, which has been frequently targeted and where security is usually heightened ahead of Friday prayers.

    At least seven people were killed and 21 wounded in the explosion that rocked one of the large neighbourhood's main streets, a police colonel and hospital sources said.

    Three roadside bombs also went off almost simultaneously near a Shia mosque close to the central Kholani square, killing three people and wounding eight, two police officers said.

    Jihadist group the Islamic State seized large parts of Iraq's west and north in June, before stopping its offensive a few dozen kilometres from Baghdad.

    But it has continued to wreak havoc in the capital, mainly with suicide attacks, car bombs and improvised explosive devices targeting security forces.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AdDhdffjS0A

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IL4Iekppj3M

    well that number of deaths went up to 21...

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #447 - August 01, 2014, 02:22 PM

    I don't think it would've been feasible for the U.S. to split Iraq. Most Iraqis were (are?) firmly against partition. It would've led to accusations of colonialist divide and conquer strategies being implemented by the U.S. And the Sunnis -- the most violent and reactionary of the three blocs -- would've ended up with no oil. That wouldn't have ended well. 

    They should've just stayed the fuck out of Iraq, lifted most of the sanctions (should never have implemented the most prohibitive ones at all) by the time the military and the Iraqi state had been sufficiently weakened and covertly supported (or at least paid lip service to) secular democratic groups. Of course, I'm basing this strategy on the laughable assumption that America is actually interested in democracy in the Middle East, and that Iraqi lives were worth more to Cheney and co. than assorted corporate interests that profited from the war. 



    It was lack of political parties that were in line with American policy. From their point of view it was already divided into 3 political groupings. The pay offs turned a lot of the radical militia groups into visible power groups which increased their political control over time. Maliki was seen as the only secular candidate.

    1. Pay off groups you shouldn't
    2. Provide arms to groups you shouldn't
    3. Turn above groups into political powers
    4. Shoot self in foot
    5. Hold elections
    6. Realize you shot your foot
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #448 - August 01, 2014, 03:52 PM

    Aussies seem to be competing with the UK for generating jihadis.

    http://mobile.news.com.au/national/nsw-act/mohamed-moey-elomar-goes-from-celebrated-boxing-champion-to-wanted-terrorist/story-fnj3rq0y-1227007611035

    from boxing champion down under to jihadi in Syria.


    "we can smell traitors and country haters"


    God is Love.
    Love is Blind. Stevie Wonder is blind. Therefore, Stevie Wonder is God.

  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #449 - August 01, 2014, 04:08 PM

    I read somewhere that Australia produced the highest number of Western jihadis in Syria per capita. Depressing and very surprising. I had no idea we had such a large jihadi element here wacko
  • Previous page 1 ... 13 14 1516 17 ... 78 Next page « Previous thread | Next thread »