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Theme Changer

 Topic: 'Islamic State' a.k.a. ISIL

 (Read 226071 times)
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  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #480 - August 07, 2014, 09:39 PM

    Is 2nd part out?


    No, its in 5 parts, I'll post each part when they're out.

    I'm not a military strategist and I don't think we should put our soldiers boots on the ground but I think America and the UK should give arms and ammunition to the Kurds and let the Peshmerga deal with ISIS and give refuge to the Christians and Yazidis. Invest in the Kurdish economy so they can flourish too. Give them some F-16s and help them build an air force.

    "we can smell traitors and country haters"


    God is Love.
    Love is Blind. Stevie Wonder is blind. Therefore, Stevie Wonder is God.

  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #481 - August 07, 2014, 10:22 PM

    I doubt the Kurds would want to fight ISIS over areas that where Arabs, Yazidis, and Christians are the majority. It seems they are just going to defend the majority Kurdish areas.

    And ISIS for their part will not want to attack Kurdish majority areas. They know the Kurds will be ready to fight tooth and nail for those areas - whereas they were not willing to protect the areas around Mosul or the city of Qaraqosh where the Christians are or Sinjar where the Yazidis are.
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #482 - August 07, 2014, 10:33 PM

    @Abu Ali
    How do you explain why the Kurds sent a major force to protect Assyrian areas.

    Stop calling us Christians, we're Assyrians :\
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #483 - August 07, 2014, 10:34 PM

    I doubt the Kurds would want to fight ISIS over areas that where Arabs, Yazidis, and Christians are the majority. It seems they are just going to defend the majority Kurdish areas.

    And ISIS for their part will not want to attack Kurdish majority areas. They know the Kurds will be ready to fight tooth and nail for those areas - whereas they were not willing to protect the areas around Mosul or the city of Qaraqosh where the Christians are or Sinjar where the Yazidis are.


    Maybe the Christians and Yazidis could find refuge in Kurdish territory? Anyway as you say, its complex and very dispiriting.

    "we can smell traitors and country haters"


    God is Love.
    Love is Blind. Stevie Wonder is blind. Therefore, Stevie Wonder is God.

  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #484 - August 07, 2014, 11:01 PM

    @Abu Ali
    How do you explain why the Kurds sent a major force to protect Assyrian areas


    I could be wrong of course, but from the way the Kurds left Qaraqosh it doesn't look like they wanted to fight ISIS over the city. btw what Assyrian areas are the Kurds protecting?

    Stop calling us Christians, we're Assyrians :\


    OK well it's the first time I have - and I didn't known that.

    So are you saying Assyrian's don't like to identify themselves as Christians?
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #485 - August 07, 2014, 11:37 PM

    Yezdis ARE Kurds.

    Don't let Hitler have the street.
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #486 - August 07, 2014, 11:42 PM

    Yezdis ARE Kurds.


    That's true, but it's not that simple - they are a distinct group from the main Kurdish group in Iraq.
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #487 - August 07, 2014, 11:48 PM

    American Forces Said to Bomb ISIS Targets in Iraq

    Quote
    American military forces bombed at least two targets in northern Iraq on Thursday night to rout Islamist insurgents who have trapped tens of thousands of religious minorities in Kurdish areas, Kurdish officials said.
    Word of the bombings, reported on Kurdish television from the city of Erbil, came as President Obama was preparing to make a statement in Washington.


    More

    `But I don't want to go among mad people,' Alice remarked.
     `Oh, you can't help that,' said the Cat: `we're all mad here. I'm mad.  You're mad.'
     `How do you know I'm mad?' said Alice.
     `You must be,' said the Cat, `or you wouldn't have come here.'
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #488 - August 08, 2014, 12:14 AM

    Badini Kurds are not a majority. Kermanji Kurds are. Kermanji Kurds living in Badini areas are referred to as Badini by others, due to their geography. The language that Iraqis call Kurdish is actually Sorani, and not the most common Kurdish tongue at all.  
    So you have multiple distinct ethnic groups of Kurds, with their own dialect, distinct enough that people from two cities might not understand each other.
    It does not matter. Each Kurd identifies further still, they do not stop at Kurdish.
    So you have Badinis in power, who are actually Kermanjis in the North, who issue statements in Sorani.
    That is three groups, in relation to the languages Barzani himself uses.
    So the Yezdis are as unique as the others, only they are less populous. I think we can all see for ourselves right now why that is.

    Don't let Hitler have the street.
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #489 - August 08, 2014, 03:09 AM

    Obama Authorizes Limited Airstrikes in Iraq if Needed

    Quote
    President Obama said he had directed United States military forces to conduct targeted airstrikes on Islamic militants if they move to take Erbil, in northern Iraq, threatening the American citizens and military personnel there.
    And he said that, at the request of the Iraqi government, he has authorized the military to help provide humanitarian assistance to Iraqi citizens, many of them religious minorities, who are trapped on a mountain.


    More

    `But I don't want to go among mad people,' Alice remarked.
     `Oh, you can't help that,' said the Cat: `we're all mad here. I'm mad.  You're mad.'
     `How do you know I'm mad?' said Alice.
     `You must be,' said the Cat, `or you wouldn't have come here.'
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #490 - August 08, 2014, 06:22 AM

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-28700212

    Also said the US is supporting both the Iraqi and Kurdish govts. and forces.
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #491 - August 08, 2014, 07:42 AM

    US carries out air drops to help Iraqis trapped on mountain by Isis

    Quote
    US military aircraft have dropped food and water for thousands of besieged Iraqis trapped by the the Islamist militant group Isis, Barack Obama has confirmed, with the president also authorising air strikes against the insurgents if they advancde towards US forces.

    The delivery of relief took place after a day of intense debate at the White House over how to respond to an Isis army that has caused mass civilian displacement as it moves closer to previously stable Iraqi Kurdistan.

    "We need to act, and act now … today, America is coming to help," the US president said after officials announced the drop.

    The air drop was the first non-supply, non-surveillance and non-transport mission the US has flown over Iraq since the 2011 troop withdrawal. The Obama administration ordered the aid mission to help besieged religious minorities chased up a mountain by militants.

    Qaraqosh, Iraq's largest Christian city, was left all but abandoned as the jihadist group Islamic State (Isis) advanced through minority communities in the country's north-west and towards the Kurdish stronghold of Irbil. Late on Thursday night the UN security council condemned the attacks and urged international support for the Iraqi government.

    The US military is already helping the Iraqi government co-ordinate air drops of vital supplies to at least 40,000 Iraqis, mostly from the Yazidi minority, trapped on top of Mount Sinjar in the north after death threats from the Islamists who have overrun much of Sunni and northern Iraq.

    On Thursday, Pentagon officials at first repeatedly and categorically denied numerous reports claiming US air strikes or aid drops had begun, while internally the Obama administration urgently debated providing direct humanitarian air drops for Yazidis suffering without food or water, and even air strikes – a fateful step that Obama has been reluctant to take during the rise of Isis.

    "We have been working urgently and directly with officials in Baghdad and Irbil to co-ordinate Iraqi airdrops to people in need," a US defence official said on condition of anonymity.

    The official said the US was in constant co-ordination with the Iraqi government on "how we can help co-ordinate additional relief, enhance their efforts and provide direct assistance wherever possible."

    The air drop and potential strikes represent the first aerial campaign over Iraq since 2011 for a purpose beyond conducting surveillance on Isis, providing long-scheduled military sales or transporting the extra hundreds of US special operations "advisers" that Obama ordered into Iraq to help Baghdad confront the insurgency.

    At the White House, press secretary Josh Earnest said the Yazidi case, as well as the mass internal displacement of Iraqi Christians, represented an "urgent humanitarian situation". He noted that Obama launched an air war against Libya's Muammar Gaddafi in 2011 to forestall a bloodbath.

    "There are times where the president has taken military action, sometimes in consultation with our allies, to protect innocent, vulnerable civilian populations from slaughter or other dire humanitarian situations," Earnest said.

    Earnest reiterated a central contention Obama has often made about the root causes of Iraq's latest crisis – one that tacitly hinges lethal aid, which has been requested by the Iraqi government, on major Iraqi political reforms. "There are no [US] military solutions to the very difficult problems that exist in Iraq," Earnest said. "The failure of Iraq's political situation early on is what led to this situation."

    Obama's national security team considers that a guidepost for avoiding a return to a bloody entanglement in Iraq and recognising the limits of US power. His critics, and some foreign allies, consider it a signal of inaction.

    Over the past several weeks hundreds of American "advisers" – mostly elite military forces – have established joint operations centres in Baghdad and in the Kurdish regional capital of Irbil. Those operations centres host US forces capable of spotting for potential air strikes.

    One option for US air missions is to launch from Incirlik air base, which the Americans share with the Turks and Britain's RAF, just outside the city of Adana on Turkey's southern Mediterranean coastline.

    It was a vital hub in both Afghan and Iraq wars, particularly for military air cargo. Its 10,000 ft main runway can accommodate giant C17 air transport planes, which can easily cover the 435 miles to the stranded Yazidi population on Mount Sinjar. Ankara announced earlier in the day that Turkish food parcels had been air-dropped for the Yazidis by Iraqi helicopters.

    The base was important strategically during the Cold War because of its close proximity to the Soviet Union. As a hangover from those days it still houses some of the few US nuclear weapons left in Europe, B61 gravity bombs, in hardened shelters on the base.

    UN officials say an estimated 200,000 new refugees are seeking sanctuary in the Kurdish north from Islamic extremists who have pursued them since the weekend. Qaraqosh, south-east of Mosul and home to around 50,000 Christians, was the latest to fall, with most residents fleeing before dawn on Thursday as convoys of extremists drew near.

    Other Christian towns near Mosul, including Tel Askof, Tel Keif and Qaramless, have also largely been emptied. Those who remained behind were reportedly given the same stark choice given to other minorities, including Yazidis: flee, convert to Islam or be killed.

    Christians, Yazidis and Turkmen have been at the frontline of Iraq's war with Isis ever since the jihadist group stormed into Mosul and Tikrit in mid-June. The Iraqi army capitulated within hours, with at least 60,000 officers and soldiers fleeing on the first day of the assault alone.

    Ever since, the jihadists have continued to make advances, while Iraqi troops have concentrated on defending Baghdad and the Shia south, leaving the defence of minorities in the north to the Kurdish peshmurga.

    However, even the much vaunted Kurdish forces were no match for the heavy weapons wielded by the jihadists as they advanced in recent days. Peshmurga officers ordered troops to withdraw to areas administered by the Kurdish regional government – a clear sign of priorities and of where the battle lines are being drawn.

    Without any protection, Yazidis, Christians and Turkmen are being uprooted from communities they have lived in for millennia and the geo-social fabric of Iraq is being rapidly shredded.

    While those who have managed to flee the Christian areas have so far had a relatively safe passage to Irbil, the tens of thousands of Yazidis remain besieged near Sinjar, with little food or water. The UN said it was able to get some supplies overland to the stranded hordes – avoiding Isis fighters who have surrounded most of Mount Sinjar. Turkish foreign minister Ahmet Davutoglu announced that Turkish helicopters had dropped food and water on the mountain top. Iraqi helicopters have also made food drops, but stranded Yazidis say they do not have enough to survive.

    The Chaldean archbishop of Kirkuk, Joseph Thomas, described the situation in northern Iraq as "catastrophic, a crisis beyond imagination". He demanded urgent intervention to save what remained of the area's Christian heritage.

    Kurdish officials on Thursday demanded more help in catering for refugees. The Kurdish administered areas have seen staggering numbers cross their notional border since the original Isis onslaught two months ago. In the first week alone, some 500,000 people are thought to have fled towards Irbil.

    The capital of the Kurdish north is already home to a new Chaldean Christian community, which fled Baghdad in the wake of an Isis-led massacre inside a cathedral in October 2010. Many fleeing Christians have headed for the Ainkawa neighbourhood, which is home to Baghdad's Christian exiles.

    The past 11 years of war and insurrection since the US invasion have led to most of Iraq's Christians fleeing. Numbers have plummeted starkly from an estimated one million before 2003 to around 150,000 now. A large number of those who remain are now displaced.

    Miriam Dagher, 53, from Qaraqosh, said churches in the city had already been torched and religious insignia smashed. "We stayed as long as we could," she said. "But nothing could save us. This is the end of our community."

    Isis has threatened to redraw the unitary borders that were carved out of the ruins of the Ottoman empire. The group's rampant insurgency and the inability of state actors to stop it has rendered the frontier between Iraq and Syria evermore irrelevant.

    In the absence of central government authority, Shia militias are taking dominant roles, amplifying sectarian enmity between Islam's two most dominant sects.

    Iraq's beleaguered prime minister, Nouri al-Maliki, no longer has the authority to unite the country's disparate sects. Maliki, a Shia Muslim, had disenfranchised much of the country's Sunni community over the past three years, some of whom have turned to Isis as a means of reasserting themselves.

    After digging in for the past two months, Maliki now faces a desperate battle to form a government, with his key backer Iran understood to have told him that it no longer supports his bid to lead the country for a third term.

    Massoud Barazani, a Kurdish leader, has said he is moving towards holding a referendum that could pave the way for an independence bid, a move that could spell the end of Iraq, and unsettle surrounding countries, including Syria, Turkey and Iran.

    The UN security council warned that the Isis attacks could constitute crimes against humanity and that those responsible should be held accountable. "The members of the security council also urge all parties to stop human rights violations and abuses and ensure humanitarian access and facilitate the delivery of assistance to those fleeing the violence," said Britain's UN ambassador Mark Lyall Grant, reading from a statement after an emergency consultation requested by France.


    Danish Never-Moose adopted by the kind people on the CEMB-forum
    Ex-Muslim chat (Unaffliated with CEMB). Safari users: Use "#ex-muslims" as the channel name. CEMB chat thread.
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #492 - August 08, 2014, 02:22 PM

    Quote
    The UN security council warned that the Isis attacks could constitute crimes against humanity

    Could?! It's fucking blatant crimes against humanity!

    `But I don't want to go among mad people,' Alice remarked.
     `Oh, you can't help that,' said the Cat: `we're all mad here. I'm mad.  You're mad.'
     `How do you know I'm mad?' said Alice.
     `You must be,' said the Cat, `or you wouldn't have come here.'
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #493 - August 08, 2014, 02:37 PM

    Looks like flights over northern Iraq have been diverted into Iranian airspace. There are no flights over it at the moment whereas when the Malaysian flight was shot down over Ukraine there still was.

    http://www.flightradar24.com/38.59,40.4/5
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #494 - August 08, 2014, 07:33 PM

    US Airstrike Begins: 2 F/A-18 drops 500lb Laser-guided Bombs on ISIS near Erbil, Iraq   says news

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5VGpv5ezOjE

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sQE51rArV8U

    well they go back home and come back., meanwhile I am sure all those Islamic heroes from west that are in ISIS will be tagged

    http://www.bbc.com/news/world-middle-east-28709530
    Quote
    US air strike on Islamic State militants in Iraq

    The US has launched an air strike against militants from the Islamic State (IS) group in northern Iraq. The Pentagon said its aircraft attacked artillery being used against Kurdish forces defending the city of Irbil.

    The Sunni Muslim group IS, formerly known as Isis, now has control of large swathes of Iraq and Syria.

    Tens of thousands of people from minority groups have fled their homes due to the militants' advance. IS has also seized Iraq's largest dam.

    According to US officials, the dam is a vital part of Iraq's infrastructure as it controls water levels on the Tigris River and is a key source of water and electricity generation for the Iraqi people.






    That is where they hit.. they say..

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #495 - August 08, 2014, 09:29 PM

    Here is a Wahhabi-Salafi condemnation of ISIS by a Saudi scholar who lectures at the Prophet's Mosque in Madinah.

    http://www.salafibayaan.com/2014/07/05/islaamic-caliphate-iraq-isis-shaykh-saaleh-bin-sad-suhaymee/




    Interesting how he made the comparison between them and Khwaarij

    "I'm standing here like an asshole holding my Charles Dickens"

    "No theory,No ready made system,no book that has ever been written to save the world. i cleave to no system.."-Bakunin
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #496 - August 08, 2014, 09:35 PM

    Interesting how he made the comparison between them and Khwaarij



    That's the done thing now. Any group that's more strict than you/you don't like is; Khawarij.
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #497 - August 08, 2014, 09:40 PM

    I remember that they rejected stoning, that's one thing they're not more extreme at.
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #498 - August 08, 2014, 11:00 PM

    Grooming children for Jihad - part 2 of the VICE documentary on ISIS

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jzCAPJDAnQA

    "we can smell traitors and country haters"


    God is Love.
    Love is Blind. Stevie Wonder is blind. Therefore, Stevie Wonder is God.

  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #499 - August 08, 2014, 11:06 PM

    ^^^ kuffars and murtads, that's all they talk about, killing, fighting, kaffirs and murtads

    "we can smell traitors and country haters"


    God is Love.
    Love is Blind. Stevie Wonder is blind. Therefore, Stevie Wonder is God.

  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #500 - August 08, 2014, 11:11 PM

    I remember that they rejected stoning, that's one thing they're not more extreme at.

     OR it's not extreme enough for them  grin12
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #501 - August 08, 2014, 11:15 PM

    TBH that sounds more likely. They seem like the boiling in oil kinda crew.

    Devious, treacherous, murderous, neanderthal, sub-human of the West. bunny
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #502 - August 08, 2014, 11:51 PM

    if that's the case, they'd act like the ancient Assyrians  dance

    My ancient ancestors were B-RUTAL, they boiled you alive THEN skinned you alive. Not only did they do decapitations too but hand cutting, finger cutting, impalement, crucifixion, etc.

    How fucking ironic is it that Assyrians are being attacked by Arabians acting like ancient Assyrians?

    EDIT: OH SHIT HERE'S ANOTHER BRAIN-OPENER; THE ASSYRIAN KINGS ESTABLISHED THEMSELVES AS KINGS OF EARTH ESTABLISHED BY THE GODS.

    HOW IS THAT ANY DIFFERENT FROM A CALIPH?
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #503 - August 08, 2014, 11:53 PM

    Pretty slow on the karma I'd say.

    Devious, treacherous, murderous, neanderthal, sub-human of the West. bunny
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #504 - August 08, 2014, 11:54 PM

    EDIT: OH SHIT HERE'S ANOTHER BRAIN-OPENER; THE ASSYRIAN KINGS ESTABLISHED THEMSELVES AS KINGS OF EARTH ESTABLISHED BY THE GODS.

    Meh. Every bunch of kings has done that. It's pretty much their only excuse for being kings.

    Devious, treacherous, murderous, neanderthal, sub-human of the West. bunny
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #505 - August 09, 2014, 02:04 AM

    Pretty slow on the karma I'd say.


    We don't even deserve the karma, ever since the fall of the Assyrian empire, Assyrians have been stateless; mostly living under the control of the Persian empires until the Islamic invasion and even then, Assyrians had a covenant with Muhammad but the Ottomans destroyed the physical paper covenant in the 1800s.

    Anyone know how I or any Assyrian can obtain a new copy of the covenant?

    I was thinking of creating an appointment with the Ulema council of Saudi Arabia and ask for a new copy.
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #506 - August 09, 2014, 02:51 AM

    Yeah, but the Al Saud are not Hashemites, right? Maybe you have to go to Jordan for that paper. I am sure when the Saudis took power, they nullified all Hashemite agreements. If they were to honor the agreements, they would not have seized Arabistan in the first place. 

    Don't let Hitler have the street.
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #507 - August 09, 2014, 01:28 PM

    Grooming children for Jihad - part 2 of the VICE documentary on ISIS

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jzCAPJDAnQA


    What a bunch of backwards, arrogant, ignorant losers. What father deliberately brings a child to a war zone?
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #508 - August 09, 2014, 01:32 PM

    Some good news. It seems like at least some of the Yezidis trapped on Mount Shingal have been able to get out with the help of Kurdish militias and a whiff of grapeshot from the US Air Force.

    Thousands of Stranded Civilians Rescued on Mount Shingal

    Quote
    ZAKHO, Kurdistan Region—Local officials said today that 10,000 Yezidis who were stranded on Mount Shingal for one week were rescued and settled in the town of Zakho.

    Medical teams and aid organizations in Zakho have rushed in to assist the rescued families, said Rudaw reporter.

    Ashti Kocher, Zakho’s security chief said that Kurdish armed forces have opened a safe corridor for the Yezidis at Mount Shingal.

    “We have also cleared about 30 kilometers of the ISIL forces in order to open a road for those families,” said Kocher, who currently leads a Peshmerga unit at Sinune village near Shingal.

    Kocher said that the rescued civilians were transported to the Kurdistan Region through Rojava (Syrian Kurdistan) which is under the control of Kurdish forces known as the Peoples Protection Units (YPG).

    Barakat Issa, Rudaw reporter on Mount Shingal said that the number of Yezidis stranded on the mountain is higher than initially reported. He said that nearly 100,000 people are hiding on the mountain.

    Issa said that in the past few days 60 children and elderly have said of hunger and thirst while there is fear that Islamic militants controlling the town of Shingal and other villages have massacred hundreds of others.

    Ferhad Hamo, Rudaw reporter in the town of Derik in Rojava said that around 15,000 rescued Yezidis had arrived at Newroz camp in Rojava.


    Danish Never-Moose adopted by the kind people on the CEMB-forum
    Ex-Muslim chat (Unaffliated with CEMB). Safari users: Use "#ex-muslims" as the channel name. CEMB chat thread.
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #509 - August 09, 2014, 01:33 PM

    that second part of the VICE documentary was more disturbing than I thought it would be. The language they use is unremittingly hateful and dehumanising.

    "we can smell traitors and country haters"


    God is Love.
    Love is Blind. Stevie Wonder is blind. Therefore, Stevie Wonder is God.

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