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Theme Changer

 Topic: 'Islamic State' a.k.a. ISIL

 (Read 358395 times)
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  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #150 - June 24, 2014, 04:14 PM

    Convert to Islam or face the sword, Iraqi Christians told by Sunni extremists

    Quote
    ANKAWA, Iraq — Convert to Islam or face the sword.

    That was the stark message Christians in the Syrian city of Raqqa received last year when ultra-fundamentalist Sunni extremists, proclaiming themselves to be members of the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL), seized power and launched a reign of terror against Shiites and Christians that has included beheadings and at least three crucifixions.

    Aware of ISIL’s ferocious reputation for murder and mayhem, thousands of Christians who lived in Mosul and the surrounding Nineveh Plain fled in panic when ISIL rebels captured Iraq’s second largest city from government forces on June 10. Many of those who escaped have sought refuge in this Christian enclave in the Kurdish city of Irbil, only an hour’s drive away from Mosul.

    “All who are left there now are a few handicapped or sickly Christians,” said a Chaldean Catholic nun wearing a blue habit whose religious community fled Mosul on foot, walking north for four hours on June 10 along with thousands of other Christian and Muslim refugees.

    They all feared persecution at the hands of the insurgents who had suddenly arrived in their midst because they follow a harsh 7th century interpretation of the Qur’an that demands not only that women mostly stay indoors, but that church bells must never be rung, crosses must never be displayed and Christians must pay a “gold tax” in return for their lives.

    The nun pleaded repeatedly that her name and her order not be disclosed, lest the rebels read her comments on the Internet.

    “They’ve taken down every monument in Mosul, whether they depict Iraqi political figures or Catholics,” she said in impeccable French that she polished during a year studying in Montreal.

    “They removed a statue of the Virgin Mary but as far as I know they have not destroyed it.”

    About 120 parishioners attended Sunday mass at St. Elias Chaldean Catholic Church in Ankawa where Father Shahar gave a homily about the need for reconciliation. “I hope that peace will come again to Syria, to Baghdad, to Mosul and to Iraq,” was the priest’s only reference to the sectarian violence now convulsing the country.

    Fear permeated the congregation on a day when ISIL fighters claimed another border town with Syria, making it easier for them to move arms in both direction because they control a large swath of northern Syria where they have been fighting Bashar Assad’s regime.

    There have been Christians in Iraq since the 1st century when two disciples of Jesus brought the gospel here. As recently as 2003 Iraq had 1.5 million Christians. But since then there have been more than 70 attacks on churches, several priests have been murdered and the number of Christians has plummeted to less than less than 500,000. This latest spasm of sectarian violence is likely to lead to another mass exodus.

    A 72-year-old parishioner, who would only give his name as Dominique, said he had been forced to leave Mosul for Baghdad in 1960 after his father was murdered for being a Christian. When the church he attended in Baghdad was blown up a three years ago, he, his wife and their son sought sanctuary in Irbil’s Christian suburb of Ankawa.

    “To be a Christian in Iraq is to be subjected to terrorist acts,” said Dominique, who many years ago received a graduate degree in engineering from Wayne State University in Detroit. Dominique’s distant cousin, Archbishop Paulos Faraj Rahho, was kidnapped from his car and murdered in Mosul six years ago.

    “We move from city to city in Iraq because we have believed in the promises of the government and of Muslim clerics that we would be safe,” he said, adding with grim laugh, “we now believe that we have run out of places to hide.”

    Dominique’s son, Michael, who attended mass with his parents, said that although his family was safe for the moment in Iraq’s Kurdish autonomous region, “we cannot forget that Mosul collapsed in only two hours.

    “We believe that the Peshmerga (the Kurdish army) are strong and on paper the Kurds give us more rights than anywhere else,” said Michael, who has a master’s degree in computer science from a British university. “Still, we have this feeling that we are guests in our own country. We know that the common issue that binds Sunnis and Shiites is that they are Muslims.”

    While acknowledging that they had little information about Canada’s reaction to the plight of Christians in Iraq and Syria, Christians, Dominique and Michael said the perception among Iraq’s Christians was that the Canadian government was more interested in maintaining cordial relations with Muslim countries than in helping Christians in mortal peril. Nor did they feel that there was much chance that they would be allowed to settle in Britain or the U.S.

    “We see that they give passports to Muslim terrorists and accept homosexuals who say they have been discriminated against and yet they refuse us entry,” Michael said.

    The nun, Michael and his father all said in separate conversations that with Catholic, Orthodox Christian and Coptic communities also under siege in Syria and Egypt the only likely future for Christians was to leave the Middle East.

    “We are in no danger right now but who knows in this country,” the nun said. “We have no idea what they will do next. The Kurdish area is the quietest place in Iraq, but until when nobody knows.”


    `But I don't want to go among mad people,' Alice remarked.
     `Oh, you can't help that,' said the Cat: `we're all mad here. I'm mad.  You're mad.'
     `How do you know I'm mad?' said Alice.
     `You must be,' said the Cat, `or you wouldn't have come here.'
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #151 - June 24, 2014, 04:17 PM

    Apparently this story is about jihadists who raped a christian mother and daughter when they couldn't pay jizya. Can an Arabic speaker have a look?

    http://www.alghadeer.tv/news/detail/15640/

    `But I don't want to go among mad people,' Alice remarked.
     `Oh, you can't help that,' said the Cat: `we're all mad here. I'm mad.  You're mad.'
     `How do you know I'm mad?' said Alice.
     `You must be,' said the Cat, `or you wouldn't have come here.'
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #152 - June 25, 2014, 08:13 PM

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xQL2AMrFtm0

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g_4R27no8IU

    That is war within Islam..

    Do not let silence become your legacy.. Question everything   
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #153 - June 26, 2014, 03:17 AM

    Apparently this story is about jihadists who raped a christian mother and daughter when they couldn't pay jizya. Can an Arabic speaker have a look?

    http://www.alghadeer.tv/news/detail/15640/

    The title says 4 girls refused to wear hijab and were killed.

    As much as that could be real, I wouldn't read from a site like "al-ghadeer" because it would be heavily biased towards shias. Just on the side it has links to mullah crap.

    ******************************************************************

    Interesting talking points I watched on an Iraqi talk show.

    1a. Iraq's army cosists of 250k men, they can't possibly patrol a single border of 300k kilometers.

    1b. Turkey's border contains professional kurd fighters and rebels who want Iraq, Saudi Arabia's border contains links to extreme Islamic ideologies, Syria's border is an open border with hungry terrorists.

    1c. Speaker concludes: Iraq needs foreign intervention.

    2. Anti ISIS northerner speakers appealing to Iraqi nationalism: Do you really want to be ruled by Saudis, Pakistanis, Afghans, *insert a bunch of other Jihadi-sending countries* to rule you? We invented civilization, *insert nationalistic rant*.

    I think that would really appeal to most Iraqis^. Iraqis are extremely nationalistic about Iraq - and the concept of all nationalities chillin' together is one formed in Western country Islamic communities.


    Quote from: ZooBear 

    • Surah Al-Fil: In an epic game of Angry Birds, Allah uses birds (that drop pebbles) to destroy an army riding elephants whose intentions were to destroy the Kaaba. No one has beaten the high score.

  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #154 - June 26, 2014, 04:31 AM

    Cheers Jila, I'm not familiar with that site so I didn't know how reputable it was.

    `But I don't want to go among mad people,' Alice remarked.
     `Oh, you can't help that,' said the Cat: `we're all mad here. I'm mad.  You're mad.'
     `How do you know I'm mad?' said Alice.
     `You must be,' said the Cat, `or you wouldn't have come here.'
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #155 - June 26, 2014, 07:45 AM


    ............ Iraqis are extremely nationalistic about Iraq - and the concept of all nationalities chillin' together is one formed in Western country Islamic communities.

    That statement used to fit only to Baathist party in  the initial times of Saddam's regime. Also it used to fit to some extent for Syrian Baathist party.  Things have dramatically changed after Khomeini took over Iran and after AMRIKA  took over Iraq whole thing fell apart ..


    near Future map of middle east?

    Do not let silence become your legacy.. Question everything   
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #156 - June 26, 2014, 07:49 AM

    a... border of 300k kilometers.

    Long border.
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #157 - June 26, 2014, 10:31 AM

    Pan-ummahism isn't truly embraced by most Muslims. People will always have a natural affinity to their country and resist foreign occupation/invasion, even if it comes under the banner of Islam. Particularly with Easterners, nationalism is pretty strong. 

    http://www.newsweek.com/iraqs-sunnis-will-kick-out-isis-after-dumping-maliki-ex-cia-official-256270

    From the article: 
    Quote
    “ISIS...” adds Nance, “will…exact a painful level of control over the Sunni population that will make them regret the very moment they fooled themselves into believing Maliki was worse than Saddam. I was there last year for a month and all I kept hearing was that Maliki was a tyrant. They overestimate every political difficulty, but this time the Sunnis have signed their own death warrants.”


    I tend to agree with this. The first CIA guy is way too optimistic of the Sunnis ability to push ISIS out. The Sunnis made a BIG mistake in aligning themselves with ISIS. Just like the Syrians fucked up by allowing foreign jihadis to hijack their rebellion. Once these caliphate-seekers get in and take control, they're not going to leave and opposition is not tolerated. My impression is that the Iraqi Sunnis won't enjoy Taliban-style rule, and they won't be able to fight off experienced, fearless and well-armed jihadis so they'll quickly regret this stupidity. 
     
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #158 - June 26, 2014, 10:56 AM

    Pan-ummahism isn't truly embraced by most Muslims.  .........

     That is a catchy word., but out of 1.5 billion people,  If most Muslims  goes for that rubbishism  then there will clash of civilizations and wars everywhere with this Muslims-Non-Muslims  agenda..  And there would have not been any wars in the middle-east..

    Do not let silence become your legacy.. Question everything   
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #159 - June 26, 2014, 11:26 AM

    Pan-ummahism isn't truly embraced by most Muslims. People will always have a natural affinity to their country and resist foreign occupation/invasion, even if it comes under the banner of Islam. Particularly with Easterners, nationalism is pretty strong. 


    The Kurds exemplify this.


    I tend to agree with this. The first CIA guy is way too optimistic of the Sunnis ability to push ISIS out. The Sunnis made a BIG mistake in aligning themselves with ISIS. Just like the Syrians fucked up by allowing foreign jihadis to hijack their rebellion. Once these caliphate-seekers get in and take control, they're not going to leave and opposition is not tolerated. My impression is that the Iraqi Sunnis won't enjoy Taliban-style rule, and they won't be able to fight off experienced, fearless and well-armed jihadis so they'll quickly regret this stupidity. 


    A strong and secure Kurdish state is one thing we should support. The Peshmerga hate the jihadis and are motivated fighters. Maybe they could form a federation / protectorate for Christians and other minorities too?

    "we can smell traitors and country haters"


    God is Love.
    Love is Blind. Stevie Wonder is blind. Therefore, Stevie Wonder is God.

  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #160 - June 26, 2014, 11:32 AM

    That statement used to fit only to Baathist party in  the initial times of Saddam's regime. Also it used to fit to some extent for Syrian Baathist party.  Things have dramatically changed after Khomeini took over Iran and after AMRIKA  took over Iraq whole thing fell apart ..

    (Clicky for piccy!)
    near Future map of middle east?


    That's a really interesting map. A lot less straight lines in terms of borders.
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #161 - June 26, 2014, 12:13 PM

    "The West" just needs to invade and hold the entire region for a couple of hundred of years and brutally guarantee everyones personal security while the borders are redrawn mysmilie_977 The Saudis will shit themselves if they see that map.

    A strong and secure Kurdish state is one thing we should support. The Peshmerga hate the jihadis and are motivated fighters. Maybe they could form a federation / protectorate for Christians and other minorities too?

    Agree. I don't know much about the politics of Iraqi Kurdistan but I do know that PKK and BDP of Turkey are vocal supporters of both minorities' and women's rights AND empowerment and I know that Iraqi Kurdistan has been fighting things like FGM actively. Also PKK and BDP have acknowledged the role of the Kurds in the genocides of Armenians, Assyrians and Greeks.

    For Syria the Kurdish YPG militia seems to one of the best disciplined and they are known to also take in non-Kurds for their ranks.

    Danish Never-Moose adopted by the kind people on the CEMB-forum
    Ex-Muslim chat (Unaffliated with CEMB). Safari users: Use "#ex-muslims" as the channel name. CEMB chat thread.
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #162 - June 26, 2014, 12:16 PM

    Lots of Iraqi Kurds at my uni. Some of the nicest people I have ever met, don't take things too seriously and are quite free conversationally.
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #163 - June 26, 2014, 12:58 PM

    Brainfart - ignore

    Danish Never-Moose adopted by the kind people on the CEMB-forum
    Ex-Muslim chat (Unaffliated with CEMB). Safari users: Use "#ex-muslims" as the channel name. CEMB chat thread.
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #164 - June 26, 2014, 01:48 PM

    The Kurds exemplify this.

    Yep.
    A strong and secure Kurdish state is one thing we should support. The Peshmerga hate the jihadis and are motivated fighters. Maybe they could form a federation / protectorate for Christians and other minorities too?

    Yeah, I agree the Kurds are worth supporting and minorities in the KRG fare much better than minorities in the rest of Iraq. I've also read that the Syrian Kurds get along well with Christians and Arab villagers in their region, and they're holding out against Islamist militants there too.
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #165 - June 26, 2014, 04:09 PM

    Interesting article from NewScientist on the issue. Terrifying!

    http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn25722-extremists-in-iraq-now-control-the-countrys-rivers.html#.U6xDuvldWSo

    Quote
    Extremists in Iraq now control the country's rivers

    18:26 12 June 2014 by Debora MacKenzie
    Iraq has blazed its way back onto the world's front pages in the past 48 hours, with the seemingly sudden capture of the cities of Mosul and Tikrit by an extremist group. The group seems to be targeting the region's rivers: its main geostrategic vulnerability. It now controls the upper reaches of both the Tigris and Euphrates in Iraq.

    The Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) considers itself the true government of a region stretching from Israel to Iraq. It has been among the rebels fighting Syrian president Bashar al-Assad, and controls the territory in eastern Syria around Deir al-Zour.

    Despite the apparent suddenness, ISIS's assault on Iraq has been brewing for six months. Last January, ISIS started fighting its way from Syria down the Euphrates river into Iraq. In May it captured the town of Fallujah, the scene of bloody fighting during the 2003 US-led invasion of Iraq. This week, ISIS captured Iraq's second-largest city Mosul, on the Tigris river, then advanced down the Tigris to the town of Tikrit, and beyond it to the Shiite holy town of Samarra. Both Samarra and Fallujah are within striking distance of the capital Baghdad.

    It is not clear at the time of writing whether ISIS will launch a military attack on Baghdad, or even if it could take the heavily armed city in a pitched battle.

    Choke points

    But it may not need to. Iraq is ancient Mesopotamia, the once-fertile floodplain of the Tigris and Euphrates that cradled the first human civilisation. The rivers remain crucial to the farming on which most Iraqis depend, according to a report by the International Centre for Agricultural Research on the Dry Areas, which was once based in Aleppo, Syria, but has now decamped to Amman in Jordan to avoid fighting.

    ISIS now controls several major dams on the rivers, for instance at Haditha and Samarra. It also holds one 30 kilometres north of Mosul that was built on fragile rock and poses a risk of collapse. It holds at least 8 billion cubic metres of water. In 2003, there were fears Iraqi troops might destroy the dam to wipe out invading forces. US military engineers calculated that the resulting wave would obliterate Mosul and even hit Baghdad.

    (Clicky for piccy!)

    ISIS has already used water as a weapon, in a smaller way. In late April ISIS stopped flow through the relatively small Nuaimiyah dam on the Euphrates in Fallujah, reportedly with the aim of depriving Baghdad and southern Iraq of water. It could also have been to block military approaches to the town.

    Instead, the river backed up and poured into an irrigation canal, flooding the town of Abu Ghraib and dozens of surrounding villages over 200 square kilometres. Five people died, and 20,000 to 40,000 families fled to Baghdad. The water may have permanently damaged soils, and deprived farmers downstream of vital irrigation water at a critical time of year. Southern Iraq is mainly populated by Shiite Muslims, to whom ISIS and its Sunni allies are opposed.

  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #166 - June 26, 2014, 04:17 PM


     I just don't understand why this newscientist is publishing such news., Are they short of Science news?

    Do not let silence become your legacy.. Question everything   
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #167 - June 26, 2014, 04:19 PM

    Its Environmental Science Yeez. I am doing and Environmental Management MSc and there is a lot of politics and social work that goes in to tackling environmental issues as well as science science.
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #168 - June 26, 2014, 04:30 PM

    Its Environmental Science Yeez. I am doing and Environmental Management MSc and there is a lot of politics and social work that goes in to tackling environmental issues as well as science science.

    I am glad to know that you are doing  Environmental Management MSc Lilyesque.,
     
    But I am not sure how much Environmental science is there in such articles as it is mostly highlighting criminal nature but I must say here after that John Maddox left new scientist it appears that magazine has become Nuisance Science  magazine

    Do not let silence become your legacy.. Question everything   
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #169 - June 26, 2014, 04:34 PM

    NewScientist is not the same as Nature and Nature is a good magazine and journal, have a pain in the ass website to use though.
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #170 - June 26, 2014, 04:38 PM

    NewScientist is not the same as Nature and Nature is a good magazine and journal, have a pain in the ass website to use though.

    I know ..I know Lilyesqe., I published papers in Nature.. And the name I mentioned
     
    .......... but I must say here after that John Maddox left new scientist ......

     never worked for Nature..

    Do not let silence become your legacy.. Question everything   
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #171 - June 26, 2014, 04:44 PM

    Are you trying to piss me off? Huh?

    That wiki link states

    Quote
    From 1964 to 1966 he was the coordinator of the Nuffield Science Teaching Project; after which he was appointed editor of Nature, a role he held from 1966 to 1973 (and 1980–95).


    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Maddox

    http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=vPx4nIsx0EoC&pg=PA326&lpg=PA326&dq=new+scientist+maddox&source=bl&ots=WCfXDqf0Kl&sig=8IcvkteJiDk2Z0exRldh3eARoJE&hl=en&sa=X&ei=wE2sU_scpdDsBsL7gJAJ&ved=0CGEQ6AEwBQ#v=onepage&q=new%20scientist%20maddox&f=false
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #172 - June 26, 2014, 04:51 PM

    Are you trying to piss me off? Huh?

    That wiki link states

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Maddox  

     Nooo. I am sorry I am not trying to piss you off Lilyesque..
    NewScientist is not the same as Nature and Nature is a good magazine and journal, have a pain in the ass website to use though.

    I am just a hustler  Cheesy  

     when you  said "Nature is a good magazine".. I was laughing at myself for busting my ass and others to get an  article published in it .."A magazine"..  Cheesy  Sorry...

    Do not let silence become your legacy.. Question everything   
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #173 - June 26, 2014, 04:53 PM

    What happened? What field do you work in? Don't say behind Tesco's!
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #174 - June 26, 2014, 05:58 PM

    Nooo. I am sorry I am not trying to piss you off Lilyesque..I am just a hustler  Cheesy 

     when you  said "Nature is a good magazine".. I was laughing at myself for busting my ass and others to get an  article published in it .."A magazine"..  Cheesy  Sorry...

    Have you been published?

    `But I don't want to go among mad people,' Alice remarked.
     `Oh, you can't help that,' said the Cat: `we're all mad here. I'm mad.  You're mad.'
     `How do you know I'm mad?' said Alice.
     `You must be,' said the Cat, `or you wouldn't have come here.'
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #175 - June 26, 2014, 06:38 PM

    "The West" just needs to invade and hold the entire region for a couple of hundred of years and brutally guarantee everyones personal security while the borders are redrawn mysmilie_977


    This will totally work.  Roll Eyes

    how fuck works without shit??


    Let's Play Chess!

    harakaat, friend, RIP
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #176 - June 26, 2014, 06:47 PM

    I think he's being sarcastic?
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #177 - June 26, 2014, 07:00 PM

    What happened? What field do you work in? Don't say behind Tesco's!

    I did publish in it Lilyesque .. And field is Biology/Chemistry interface.. with bit of Evolution added to it.. 

    Anyways stop that and go back to the thread  " ISIS take Mosul "

    well   "Syrian Air force is  Bombing AMRIKA NO FLY ZONE"

    Do not let silence become your legacy.. Question everything   
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #178 - June 26, 2014, 07:17 PM

    Yup. It's got/is getting really complicated politically around there. Some sides together fighting against other sides yet those same sides fighting against their allies and the US, UK and EU generally being like we don't like the Syrian govt. but we don't like ISIS more.
  • ISIS take Mosul
     Reply #179 - June 26, 2014, 11:26 PM

    Just in
    http://www.aina.org/news/20140626144612.htm
    50,000 Assyrians Flee Fighting in North Iraq

    (AINA) -- Nearly all of the population of Qaraqosh, 50,000 Assyrians, has fled the city amid fighting between ISIS and Kurds. Syrian Catholic Archbishop Mar Youhana Boutros Moshe attempted to negotiate with ISIS and the Kurds to convince them to leave the city, but the negotiations failed. ISIS and the 'Revolutionary Tribes' (Sunnis) are set to storm the city.

    According to Bishop Yousif Habash of the Syriac Orthodox Church in New Jersey, Qaraqosh (also known as Baghdede) is now almost completely abandoned. A source reporting from Qaraqosh told AINA the population has fled to Arbel, Dohuk, Alqosh, Tel Kepe, Telsqop and Ankawa. Monasteries and churches are filled with displaced Christian refugees from Baghdede. There is an urgent need for food, water, medical aid and blankets.

    Kurdish forces and ISIS pounded each other with mortars. The Kurds have positioned themselves on the east of Qaraqosh, ISIS and the 'Revolutionary Tribes' have stationed themselves on the west and south side, near the villages of Tawajna and Qurtaba-Arab and south of Balawat.

    ISIS has given the Kurdish forces an ultimatum to leave by 7 P.M. else face an attack.

    The city is known by three names: Baghdede or ܒܓܕܝܕܐ in Assyrian, Hamdaniya in Arabic and Qaraqosh in Turkish.
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