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 Topic: Sisi elected Egypt president by landslide says news

 (Read 10016 times)
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  • Sisi elected Egypt president by landslide says news
     OP - May 30, 2014, 12:08 PM

    Sisi elected Egypt president by landslide


    Quote
    Former army chief wins presidential vote with an overwhelming 93 percent, as opposition candidate concedes defeat. Former army chief Abdel Fattah el-Sisi has won a landslide victory in the Egyptian presidential election, securing 93.3 percent of the votes cast, judicial sources have said.


    93 percent   errrrrr    I don't want to read any thing.,  THAT IS A JOKE and that turncoat Sisi is  a joker who sent Egypt back to 1990s..  And It could get worse ..

     well read it all at the link.. and here http://www.bbc.com/news/world-middle-east-27614776

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Sisi elected Egypt president by landslide says news
     Reply #1 - May 30, 2014, 01:06 PM

    It's embarrasing.... 93 % ..... finmad

    "The healthiest people I know are those who are the first to label themselves fucked up." - three
  • Sisi elected Egypt president by landslide says news
     Reply #2 - May 30, 2014, 08:37 PM

    Back to the status quo I guess. Sad to see rigged elections are back.
  • Sisi elected Egypt president by landslide says news
     Reply #3 - June 21, 2014, 05:06 PM

    News Says Large Scale death sentences to Muslim Brotherhood  A Sisi Court confirms from ...Egypt  


     Egyptian Muslim Brotherhood leader Mohammed Badie gesturing as he shouts from inside the defendants cage during his trial in the capital Cairo, 7 June 2014
    Quote
    An Egyptian court has confirmed death sentences for 183 Muslim Brotherhood supporters accused of a 2013 attack on a police station, lawyers say. A judge had recommended the death penalty for the 683 defendants, in a widely-criticised mass trial in April. Muslim Brotherhood leader Mohammed Badie is facing execution after two separate trials

    Mohammed Badie, leader of the banned group, was among those whose sentences were upheld. Appeals are now likely. The military-installed government has sentenced hundreds of its opponents since December.

    Authorities have cracked down harshly on Islamists since former President Mohammed Morsi, who belongs to the Muslim Brotherhood, was removed by the military in July 2013 following mass protests.

    Quote
    Saturday's verdict was delivered by a court in the town of Minya, south of Cairo. Four of the defendants were given sentences of 15-25 years in jail and the rest were acquitted.

    The defendants were accused of involvement in the murder and attempted murder of policemen in Minya province on 14 August 2013, the day police killed hundreds of Muslim Brotherhood supporters in clashes in Cairo.  



    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZPu3CjP7BT8

    That is after last Friday Prayers in the Cairo neighborhood

    I am not sure who is advising him, but This FOOL Sisi  digging his own grave and others around him  including taking down whatever bit good that is there in Egypt..

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Sisi elected Egypt president by landslide says news
     Reply #4 - June 21, 2014, 06:50 PM

    Well yeezevee I was in Egypt recently and I never heard a bad word said against him.  All the people seemed very happy that he won.  Huh?

    "The greatest general is not the one who can take the most cities or spill the most blood. The greatest general is the one who can take Heaven and Earth without waging the battle." ~ Sun Tzu

  • Sisi elected Egypt president by landslide says news
     Reply #5 - June 22, 2014, 05:20 AM

    Tyrants have been ruling over lands like this for so long its hard to recall what it was like to not have a tyrant oppression the people =/.
  • Sisi elected Egypt president by landslide says news
     Reply #6 - June 22, 2014, 07:38 AM

    What gets me is why they rig the election to that extent. 60% would do the job, and be far less obvious.

    Devious, treacherous, murderous, neanderthal, sub-human of the West. bunny
  • Sisi elected Egypt president by landslide says news
     Reply #7 - June 22, 2014, 07:49 AM

    Well yeezevee I was in Egypt recently and I never heard a bad word said against him.  All the people seemed very happy that he won.  Huh?

    Well people have no choice and  he is popular for all the wrong reasons ., He took power away from the BROTHEL HOOD fools in a wrong way and that is not good for Egypt in a long run in the  next 5 to 10 years or as long as he is in power..  This guy with his dictator election rigging process  effectively nullified a very decent opposition that was  going against those allah hooo akbaar  fools and that Muslim  bum Mohamed Morsi

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Sisi elected Egypt president by landslide says news
     Reply #8 - June 22, 2014, 06:33 PM

    So what changes is he likely to bring to Egypt that aren't good for the people?

    "The greatest general is not the one who can take the most cities or spill the most blood. The greatest general is the one who can take Heaven and Earth without waging the battle." ~ Sun Tzu

  • Sisi elected Egypt president by landslide says news
     Reply #9 - June 22, 2014, 11:13 PM

    Probably more of the same. Also he's no secularist, so secularist who supported him will get some version of sharia without islamistlabel+no fair elections.
  • Sisi elected Egypt president by landslide says news
     Reply #10 - June 23, 2014, 01:03 AM

    Well yeezevee I was in Egypt recently and I never heard a bad word said against him.  All the people seemed very happy that he won.  Huh?

    So what changes is he likely to bring to Egypt that aren't good for the people?


    I don't think he is going to bring  any changes to Egypt.. It is going to be statuesque  similar to that Hosni Mubarak regime of 30 years and that is not good for Egyptians

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Sisi elected Egypt president by landslide says news
     Reply #11 - June 23, 2014, 06:09 AM

    So what changes is he likely to bring to Egypt that aren't good for the people?



    Well in terms of the political situation, it never really mattered. The leader is just a puppet or figurehead, the power is actually in the hands of the military.

    For example, the military allowed Morsi to win, and then proceeded turn off the economic flow to the society (sky-high oil prices and unavailability, electricity problems, etc). This created movement against him. Once Sisi came to power, everything changed because the millitary once again allowed economic flow, almost overnight!

    It doesn't matter who you put up top, nothing changes until the power-structure in Egypt changes. As Senator Lindsey Graham said, the Egyptian army is the US 'ace in the hole' to ensure their interests are protected in the region.
  • Sisi elected Egypt president by landslide says news
     Reply #12 - May 31, 2015, 06:28 PM

    Egypt deploys scholars to teach moderate Islam,  says new with that Sissi picture



    Quote
    CAIRO: In his battle against militant Islam, Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi is relying not just on bomber planes and soldiers but on white-turbaned clerics from Al-Azhar, Egypt's 1,000-year-old centre for Islamic learning. He wants clerics to counter radicalism in the classroom.

    Quote
    In a televised speech in January at an Al-Azhar conference centre in Cairo, Sisi called for “a religious revolution” in Islam. Radicalised thinking, he told the audience of Islamic scholars, had become “a source of anxiety, danger, killing and destruction for the rest of the world.”

    That had to change ─ and the scholars had a leading role to play, in schools, mosques and on the airwaves.

    “You, imams, are responsible before Allah. The entire world is waiting. The entire world is waiting for your next word because this nation is being torn apart.”

    Surprised by the president's bluntness, the scholars went “white as sheets,” some of those in the audience told a Western official. The president's warning is part of a much larger project. To contain the radical Islamist movement roiling his nation, Sisi has most conspicuously been using the law and brute force. But he is also promoting a more moderate and less politicised version of the faith.

    In that struggle, the Al-Azhar institution is one of the most important fronts for Sisi ─ and for the wider region. The outcome of the struggle in Egypt, the intellectual and cultural capital of the Arab world, has ramifications far beyond its borders.
    Quote
    The Al-Azhar mosque was built in the 10th century and is one of the oldest in Egypt. It opened a university that spread Shia Islam until the end of the Fatimid Caliphate in 1171. It later turned into a Sunni mosque and university that taught the four schools of mainstream Sunni Islam. Today, the university's various faculties and research centres have 450,000 students, many from countries across Asia and Africa. It also has a network of more than 9,000 schools across Egypt attended by more than 2 million students.

    Al-Azhar's teachers, preachers, and researchers have so far introduced a few small changes. They include tweaking text books and setting up an online monitoring centre to track militant statements on social media so the institute can better refute them.

    But there is no detailed reform programme yet, and Al-Azhar officials openly acknowledge the magnitude of the challenge ahead.

    To be successful, Sisi will need to achieve what many before him have not: balancing tough security measures with education to encourage a more moderate version of Islam.

    Past experiences in Egypt, Syria, Algeria, and Iraq show that attempts to crack down on extremism can also stoke it. So far the results of Sisi's drive have been mixed. The president is deeply religious and has a mark on his forehead from years of pressing his head to the carpet in daily prayer. His wife and daughter wear the veil.

    His reputation for piety was so well known that his predecessor, Mohamed Morsi, a leading figure in the Muslim Brotherhood and Egypt's first freely-elected president, appointed him army chief in August 2012. Yet Sisi was also bold enough to seize power from Morsi after the Brotherhood leader became increasingly unpopular.

    Since then, he has cracked down hard on the Brotherhood. Hundreds of the group's supporters have been killed, and thousands jailed. This month, a Cairo court recommended the death sentence for Morsi in connection with a mass jail break in 2011. Balancing that sort of force with a message of moderation is difficult.

    Some students at Al-Azhar say they are deeply sceptical of the institution, and of the government's plans. Many dismiss Al-Azhar as a mouthpiece for the state, which favours the military and political elites over the poor masses where militants find most of their recruits. Some students told Reuters the security crackdown was counterproductive. Cairo's heavy-handed tactics, they say, are radicalising people who may have been open to a message of moderation.

    Western officials praise Sisi's calls for action but question whether he has any real plan. “There's a kernel of a very big idea in what Sisi wants to do,” said one. “But his vision of it is not exactly clear and it's not clear how it will be implemented.”

    Modernising texts:

    Critics say Al-Azhar's Grand Imams have long issued religious edicts in support of government policy. During the time of Hosni Mubarak, Egypt's president for three decades until his overthrow in 2011, the Grand Imam was appointed by a presidential decree.

    The military government that took over from Mubarak gave Al-Azhar more independence. It allowed an Al-Azhar committee to elect the Grand Imam, though the winner still have to be ratified by presidential decree. When Morsi came to power in 2012, Al-Azhar criticised his policies and accused the Brotherhood of trying to place its own men into top teaching positions. By contesting and winning faculty seats, the Brotherhood ultimately did gain some influence in the institution.

    Since Sisi seized power, though, Al-Azhar has purged Morsi-era professors and teachers, and returned to an appointment system in which the state plays a major role. It has also publicly backed Sisi's crackdown on the Brotherhood and militants.

    Al-Azhar's Grand Imam, Ahmed al-Tayeb, was one of a few public figures who flanked Sisi as he announced the military takeover in 2013 after days of mass protests against Morsi. The university has issued new rules stating that any student or faculty member who incites, supports or joins in protests that disrupt learning or promote rioting or vandalism will be expelled or fired.

    Beginning in 2013, Al-Azhar also started to simplify its curriculum to make it more compatible with the modern age, said Abbas Shuman, Al-Azhar deputy head. School text book passages describing the spoils of war and slavery have been removed, he said, because they were applicable during the Muslim conquests but are now considered out of date.

    An introduction to an online version of a book on Islamic theology now reads: “We present this scientific content to our sons and daughters and ask God that he bless them with tolerance and moderate thought ... and for them to show the right picture of Islam to people.”

    Sitting in Al-Azhar's headquarter in old Cairo, Shuman said that such changes are reasonable. “Al-Azhar is built on Islamic heritage. But not all of it is sacred,” he said. The university insists that students should not read old religious texts without guidance. And Professor Abdel Fattah Alawari, dean of the Islamic theology faculty at Al-Azhar, said specialised panels had also been created to review books written by professors to make sure they do not lean towards extremism.

    Clerics are also trying to modernise methods of communication. Al-Azhar recently started a YouTube channel to counter Islamist propaganda with its own, and has begun using social media to condemn Islamic State atrocities. Sheikhs from Al-Azhar have embarked on tours of youth centres around the country to promote moderate thought and discourage radicalism.

    Abdel Hay Azab, president of Al-Azhar university, said: “Al-Azhar university educates scientists, preachers, doctors and engineers. So when Al-Azhar provides its educational services to society, it has to be with the right vision for religion, which is that religion should not be seen as an obstacle in society.”

    “Fiqh-Lite”

    The reforms have not been universally welcomed. Al-Azhar's university campuses saw several violent pro-Brotherhood protests after Morsi was deposed. Some students are opposed to changes to the curriculum. Yousef Hamdi, a third-year student studying Islamic theology, said he was upset that he has not been taught the four mainstream schools of thought on Sunni learning and the differences between them. They include rulings by early prominent clerics such as “using force against oppression and rejecting the ruler.”

    Like some other students, he feels the reforms mean he is not being taught the full teachings of Islam. The result, Hamdi said, is that some students now seek out books that teach what they feel is pure and traditional Islamic jurisprudence.

    “A number of students have become radicalised as a result of that, because they turned to these texts on radicalisation without aid and instruction from Al-Azhar,” he said. Another student, who met with Reuters in the Cairo metro to avoid detection by security services, said the move to a softer version of fiqh ─ the interpretation of Islamic Shariah law ─ has made people angry.

    “They want to change the curriculum ... They've turned it into 'fiqh-lite',” he said. Shuman, Al-Azhar's deputy head, said the curriculum changes have not weakened the fiqh taught. “Shariah law allows for rulings that are no longer applicable to the modern age to be reviewed to make it more suitable for this age,” he said.

    But H.A. Hellyer, a nonresident fellow at the Brookings Institution in Washington, questioned Al-Azhar's approach.

    Quote
    “The students need to be able to contextualise those references properly ... Otherwise they'll end up being susceptible to radicals who'll give them those references, but in a monumentally flawed fashion,” he said.

    It is not hard to find radical texts. Just outside Al-Azhar mosque in Cairo's old quarter, a maze of alleyways is filled with scores of bookshops that sell both mainstream Islamic titles and books by more extreme Islamist scholars, including Ibn Taymiyya and Sheikh Kishk

    .

    One booklet by Ibn Taymiyya contains stand-alone statements such as “Honesty in faith is not complete without jihad for the sake of God.”

    More moderate Islamic scholars have criticised such statements because they lack any context for when jihad is justified. Bookshop owners said that they even quietly sell books by Sayyid Qutb, an Egyptian Brotherhood leader in the middle of last century who is widely seen as the father of modern radical Islamist ideology.

    Downside of tough action

    The security crackdown may be undermining the attempted education reforms, hardening the outlook of students already sympathetic to Islamists and ostracising some moderates.

    Take the 18-year-old Al-Azhar student who goes by the nickname Abu Obeida al-Ansari. The teenager attended Al-Azhar schools from his early years.

    Two years ago he joined protests in Cairo against Sisi. The protesters were angry about the fierce security crackdown that killed scores of Brotherhood members and sympathisers. The teenager was later arrested, he said, for standing next to a Brotherhood member in the street as security forces closed in.

    Ansari told Reuters via Facebook that Al-Azhar was wrong to back Sisi. He said the institution is “penetrated” by Egypt's security agencies and pro-government thinking, and that it teaches about Shariah (Islamic law) but doesn't implement it.

    Ansari said he had also grown disillusioned with the Brotherhood, which he believes buckled too easily under state pressure. He wants to join Islamic State, he said, “whether in Libya, Syria or Iraq, and then return to Egypt to take revenge on every apostate in the army and police who killed and arrested my friends.”

    He added: “Everybody ought to join jihad ... I learned that from my research, the fiqh I studied ... and Islamic State fatwas.”

    Islam Yehya, who is studying Islamic theology at Al-Azhar university, is also angered by Sisi's security crackdown. Security forces, he said, “believe that all Al-Azhar students are terrorists or Brotherhood members. And the truth is that Al-Azhar has Brotherhood, Salafists, liberals and secularists and people who don't know anything about politics.”

    The tough tactics spark a deep hatred for the police, he said. “Two of my university friends travelled to Syria to join terrorist cells after they were tortured for two months in detention,” said Yehya, who spoke at a rundown cafe in Cairo's Nasr City district.

    Egypt's government denies allegations of human rights abuses and says the Brotherhood, Islamic State and Al Qaeda pose a grave threat to Egypt.

    At the same time, security sources say authorities do target universities. One police officer told Reuters that “most of Al-Azhar students are under suspicion” and are regularly monitored. Depending on what is detected, students are either subjected to further monitoring or it is stopped.

    “Al-Azhar students have the tendency (towards extremism) and are usually a fertile ground to be deceived into joining terrorist cells,” the officer said.

    Others also take a tough line. Abdul Ghani Hendi, a religious affairs adviser in the Egyptian parliament, thinks Al-Azhar should be completely restructured to allow for self-criticism. “All the thought which dominates the society is extremists' thoughts. We should confess that frankly,” he said.

    In April, an official at the education ministry burned books in the courtyard of a private school, saying the literature included Islamic texts that incited violence. The action sparked ridicule from Islamists and secularists alike, who pointed out that some of the burned books had nothing to do with Islam.

    Nevertheless, Sisi remains committed to his drive against militancy and thinks Al-Azhar can do more to promote a moderate form of Islam. In a recent speech, he said: “We need to move faster and more effectively.”

    well that is an interesting news., I wonder  whether it is news or some Sissi paid advertisement..

    and I wonder  why that is published today in DAWN.,   

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Sisi elected Egypt president by landslide says news
     Reply #13 - May 31, 2015, 09:17 PM

    Though its not a clear proof by itself, Sisi appointed a justice minister who supports cutting of hands of the thief and beheading for apostasy, which indicates he might not be referring to the type of reform some are speaking of.Also, it maybe language tailored for Western audience, thats how arab dictators survive with Western governments supporting them.
  • Sisi elected Egypt president by landslide says news
     Reply #14 - May 31, 2015, 10:36 PM

    The reform he wants is for religion to endorse everything he does.
  • Sisi elected Egypt president by landslide says news
     Reply #15 - June 16, 2015, 12:56 PM

    Egypt court sentences Morsi to life in jail for spying  says news



    Quote
    CAIRO: An Egyptian court sentenced ousted Islamist president Mohamed Morsi to life in prison on Tuesday on charges of spying for Palestinian Islamist group Hamas, Lebanese militant group Hezbollah, and Iran.

    The court also confirmed death sentences against 16 other defendants on charges of delivering secret documents abroad between 2005 and 2013.


    delivering secret documents abroad ? what secret documents ? to whom which country? Such is the justice  in so-called Islamic world and that so called enlightened west supports idiots that deliver such justice..  I wish there were no elections and  some TOTALITARIAN REGIME IN AMRIKA or in ENGLAND  ., And see how the countries progress with such ideologies...

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Sisi elected Egypt president by landslide says news
     Reply #16 - June 16, 2015, 03:19 PM

    Opposition parties should write a new constitution BEFORE coming to power and they could also choose to demand that every party signs human rights conventions.
  • Sisi elected Egypt president by landslide says news
     Reply #17 - June 16, 2015, 10:07 PM

    Opposition parties should write a new constitution BEFORE coming to power .................

    what opposition parties? what coming power??  this Dick head.. this  DICK TRAITOR of Egypt is in power because of those who supported the scoundrel with their money and weapons.   Another news few hours ago from these links says

    Ex-Egyptian president Morsi's death sentence upheld ...

    Egypt court upholds Morsi death sentence  from aljazeera.com

    Quote
    An Egyptian court upheld a death sentence against deposed president Mohamed Morsi for plotting jailbreaks and attacks on police during the 2011 uprising.

    The court had initially sentenced Morsi and more than 100 other defendants to death last month. Tuesday's ruling comes after the court consulted Egypt's grand mufti, the government interpreter of Islamic law who plays an advisory role.

    Earlier on Tuesday, the same court sentenced Morsi, the country's first democratically elected president, to life in prison on charges of spying for the Palestinian Hamas movement, Lebanon's Shia Hezbollah, and Iran

    Look at that cooked up charges..   and he did all that from Egypt?? Sauds of sand land and their supporters are squarely behind this tragedy that is unfolding in Egypt.. The only way for Sissi to escape the mess he created is TO RUN AWAY FROM EGYPT..  .. let the people Egypt go for elections again..  

    look at this shit from that link

    Quote
    The court ruled that the sentencing of Morsi and other defendants would be referred to the grand mufti, the highest religious authority in Egypt, for confirmation before the final verdict.

      grand mufti,   My foot.,  that is how religious rogues and power hungry rogues work together to control the destiny of a nation and its people ....

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Sisi elected Egypt president by landslide says news
     Reply #18 - June 19, 2015, 06:03 PM

    You think there is no alternative to Sisi’s regime in Egypt? Think again

    Quote
    The notion held by many in the West that Egypt’s current president, the military strongman, Abdel Fattah al-Sisi, is the only available option to lead the country is as erroneous as it is dangerous. The current regime’s repressive policies are stifling the public sphere, preventing the emergence of any political leadership and are leading to radicalisation and counter-violence. There are better scenarios.
    Quote
    Washington and Brussels seem to have accepted that there is no alternative to Sisi’s regime and the West must support Egypt economically. Once again they have got it wrong. This is exactly the faulty policy advice they gave for Ben Ali’s Tunisia and Mubarak’s Egypt before the massive popular uprisings that overthrew them both.

    Following the July 3 military coup in Egypt in 2013, Western diplomats and parliamentarians urged opponents to the coup to accept the new reality and move on. If not, as I was told by visiting British parliamentarians, then “you are inviting a civil war.” When I asked: what about our vote in free and clean elections? And what are the guarantees that a military strongman does not overthrow an elected government whenever he pleases in future? The response I got was: “Accept the reality first – and then we can work something out.”

    Quote
    No flower shall bloom

    Since Sisi’s military coup, he has been eliminating any viable alternative. He has massacred, imprisoned and exiled opponents to pre-empt the emergence of rivals. There are plenty of public figures in Egyptian jails or in foreign exile that are capable of forming governments and providing an alternative to Sisi’s regime.

    Some important names, including Mohamed ElBaradei, Ayman Nour, Bassem Ouda, Mohamed Mahsoub, Mohamed El-Beltagi, Abul El Ela Madi, Isam Sultan, and Ahmed Maher, among others, immediately come to mind.

    Even Sisi’s military colleagues have been suppressed, starting with an assassination attempt against former director of intelligence Omar Suleiman in 2011 and disqualifying him from the presidential race in 2013. Former chief of staff Sami Anan was placed under house arrest, and Ahmad Shafiq was prevented from returning to Egypt to campaign for the presidency.


    No elections, no alternatives

    Alternatives come out of a functioning political process and tolerant society. This was one of the accomplishments of the revolution which started on January 25, 2011 that – once Mubarak and his tight grip on the reins of power had been removed – generated a new stratum of leaders, many of them young. Change was in the air; 13 presidential candidatesemerged with different programmes and visions, and Egypt then had alternatives.

    Since the military coup, Sisi has reverted to the practice of manipulated elections, winning last year by 97.3% of the votes. He postponed parliamentary elections – and it doesn’t look as if there will be local elections any time soon. He stifled civil society, fiercely cracking down on NGOs and promoting a monotone propaganda media machine. He closed Tahrir and other squares and arrested thousands of activists under his anti-protest law.

    The military regime has been purging state institutions and universities of anyone whose loyalty is in question. Sisi reintroduced the system (abolished after the revoution) whereby government directly appoints university deans and has stuffed state institutions with military personnel. This is an environment that suffocates any alternative.

    ‘Me or terrorism’

    The repressive and extralegal measures of the current Egyptian regime are leading to radicalisation and are fomenting violence. Certainly, this is not a viable alternative and is forcing Egypt into a low-intensity civil war. Since July 2013 more than 3,000 Egyptians have lost their lives. Meanwhile, since coming to power, Sisi has repeatedly rejected any possibility for national reconciliation and insisted on polarisation and escalation.

    Similar to Mubarak and other autocrats, Sisi presents Egyptians with a tough choice – and a fallacious one: choose him or choose terrorism and insecurity. He is de-politicising society and making it impossible for any effective political process to emerge. This closing down of open avenues for expression and participation, will – inevitably and depressingly – create the conditions for popular violence to emerge as a way to counter violence by the state

    Three alternatives

    By surrendering to the “no alternative” thesis – and by not demanding change in Egypt that opens up the political process, the release of all political prisoners and the guarantee of human rights – US and EU policymakers are rendering invaluable service to the tyranny of the Sisi regime. It makes the “no alternative” thesis a self-fulfilling prophecy that will haunt Egypt for decades to come. One can see three scenarios.

    1).  Let’s start with the least likely: Sisi reverses his repressive policies and opens up the political process. The only way to imagine this would be if Sisi, facing mounting international criticism of his failure to restore a secure society and a stable economy effectively admits defeat. This flies in the face of Sisi’s projection of himself, at home and abroad, as a strongman who is capable of eradicating terrorism and providing security for his people.

    2). In the second scenario, the military establishment decides to take a few steps back and hand over power to a civilian government which then adopts a power-sharing formula. This would be the possible result of a massive popular uprising that blames the military for the country’s economic and political failures. Of course, the only way for the military to allow this to happen would be for it to secure its own interests and admit that it can go back to its original purpose which is to guard but not govern.

    3). The most likely scenario is that the military establishment, facing humiliation over a collapse of national security (Sinai has been declared an IS province), mounting insecurity and the growing prospect that Egypt is becoming a failed state, decides to scapegoat Sisi. In this scenario the army hands over power to someone (former military or civilian) who understands the country’s economic and political interests while being able to make a new beginning and start a process of national reconciliation and political reconstruction. This new figure would lead a brief transitional period in which effective political institutions and avenues of participation can be rebuilt.

    Any one of these scenarios offers better prospects than the current unsustainable reality. Egypt needs to go back to normal politics, social healing and proper institution building. The “Sisi option” is not going to give us any of these things any time soon.


    well anyone with a bit of common sense will agree with what Emad Shahin  wrote about Egypt near future..  Emad is a visiting professor of political science at the School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University and the editor-in-chief of The Oxford Encyclopedia of Islam and Politics.

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Sisi elected Egypt president by landslide says news
     Reply #19 - June 19, 2015, 09:17 PM

    You think there is no alternative to Sisi’s regime in Egypt? Think again

    When I read the title I thought the article is worth reading...

    well anyone with a bit of common sense will agree with what Emad Shahin  wrote about Egypt near future..  Emad is a visiting professor of political science at the School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University and the editor-in-chief of The Oxford Encyclopedia of Islam and Politics.

    I find your generalization appalling.

    It's surprising that the author doesn't mention at all Muslim Brotherhood.

    He speaks about the many alternatives that Egypt had after the 2011 revolution, instead of speaking of practical alternatives resulted from 2012 elections. What's the point citing some liberal democrats and moderate islamists as alternatives, when they barely got 20% of votes so they were practically not? It looks to me that the guy has an agenda or he is extraordinary naive.
  • Sisi elected Egypt president by landslide says news
     Reply #20 - June 20, 2015, 12:37 PM

    ..........I find your generalization appalling.

     Good nbhb.,  That is exactly the reason I wrote .. to push the buttons., But it is true Commonsense is quite uncommon

    Quote
    It's surprising that the author doesn't mention at all Muslim Brotherhood.

    well he is not writing article on that brothelhood..  I know what Emad Shahin  was trained with an Islamic mindset., but what he is saying in that article  about this  Sissi dick head  killing the democratic processes in Egypt is true. On top of all that this dick&Traitor is   killing people and jailing those question Islamists and Islamism   

    Quote
    He speaks about the many alternatives that Egypt had after the 2011 revolution, instead of speaking of practical alternatives resulted from 2012 elections. What's the point citing some liberal democrats and moderate islamists as alternatives, when they barely got 20% of votes so they were practically not? It looks to me that the guy has an agenda or he is extraordinary naive.

    Hmm... you think Sissi getting 93% votes of Egyptians in the recent elections is a Fact .. right ??   and where did you get that 20% of votes?


    Nominee................Mohamed Morsi.........................Ahmed Shafik   
    Party....................Freedom and Justice....................Independent
    Popular vote...........13,230,131.....................................12,347,380
    Percentage...................51.73%.............................................48.27%

    those are the 2012 election results..   Mohamed Morsi won fair and square., It is different that he a was fool and Islamist. but the guy was fighting brothelhood  within the democratic process...  So again I say that "anyone with a bit of common sense will agree with what Emad Shahin  wrote about Egypt near future"

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Sisi elected Egypt president by landslide says news
     Reply #21 - June 20, 2015, 02:46 PM

    Good nbhb.,  That is exactly the reason I wrote .. to push the buttons., But it is true Commonsense is quite uncommon

    That's so you.  grin12

    well he is not writing article on that brothelhood..  I know what Emad Shahin  was trained with an Islamic mindset., but what he is saying in that article  about this  Sissi dick head  killing the democratic processes in Egypt is true. On top of all that this dick&Traitor is   killing people and jailing those question Islamists and Islamism   

    Sisi is a dictator of course he is killing any democratic process. That is the idea....

    Hmm... you think Sissi getting 93% votes of Egyptians in the recent elections is a Fact .. right ??   and where did you get that 20% of votes?


    Nominee................Mohamed Morsi.........................Ahmed Shafik   
    Party....................Freedom and Justice....................Independent
    Popular vote...........13,230,131.....................................12,347,380
    Percentage...................51.73%.............................................48.27%

    those are the 2012 election results..   Mohamed Morsi won fair and square., It is different that he a was fool and Islamist. but the guy was fighting brothelhood  within the democratic process...  So again I say that "anyone with a bit of common sense will agree with what Emad Shahin  wrote about Egypt near future"

    I kinda know what a dictatorship is, so don't expect me to say that this is somehow right. It's all about who do you think is less worse between Sisi and Islamists.

    Looking back at 2011-2012 elections: Muslim Brotherhood got 50%, ultra-conservative Salafists got about 30% with secular and moderate islamists only about 20%. Ultra-conservative Salafists parties ideology was/is even worse than that of Muslim Brotherhood, so salafists/islamists parties had almost 80% of parliament.

    Now you tell me again please what's the point citing some liberal democrats and moderate islamists as alternatives, when they barely got 20% of votes so they were clearly not practical alternatives. How one of those cited(Mohamed ElBaradei,...) could have been a practical alternative without popular support? Worse, almost half of those 20% votes came from Copts.

    So I stick with what I said that  if the author doesn't have an agenda, he is extraordinary naive.
  • Sisi elected Egypt president by landslide says news
     Reply #22 - June 20, 2015, 04:33 PM

    .................................
    Looking back at 2011-2012 elections: Muslim Brotherhood got 50%, ultra-conservative Salafists got about 30% with secular and moderate islamists only about 20%. Ultra-conservative Salafists parties ideology was/is even worse than that of Muslim Brotherhood, so salafists/islamists parties had almost 80% of parliament.

    I am going to cancel that unless you give me the link on that...nbhb..

    Quote
    Now you tell me again please what's the point citing some liberal democrats and moderate islamists as alternatives, when they barely got 20% of votes so they were clearly not practical alternatives. How one of those cited(Mohamed ElBaradei,...) could have been a practical alternative without popular support? Worse, almost half of those 20% votes came from Copts.

    So I stick with what I said that  if the author doesn't have an agenda, he is extraordinary naive.

    that we will talk later after we discuss those 2012 elections of Egypt.. I closely followed those elections.. Now saying all that., In your view which one is better for Egyptians..,  2 more years of Morsi or 10 or more of years of sis-pool?  .. year after year he getting 92% of votes??

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Sisi elected Egypt president by landslide says news
     Reply #23 - June 20, 2015, 06:13 PM

    It's on Wikipedia. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Egyptian_parliamentary_election,_2011%E2%80%9312. Do you have other results?

    About your question, it depends what comes after 2 years of Morsi. If it turns out to be like in Gaza, you have to understand why people are concerning about this. I hope you realize that I'm not backing up dictators. It's the alternative that I'm worried about.



  • Re: Sisi elected Egypt president by landslide says news
     Reply #24 - June 20, 2015, 08:08 PM

    That's so you.  grin12
    Sisi is a dictator of course he is killing any democratic process. That is the idea....
    I kinda know what a dictatorship is, so don't expect me to say that this is somehow right. It's all about who do you think is less worse between Sisi and Islamists.

    Looking back at 2011-2012 elections: Muslim Brotherhood got 50%, ultra-conservative Salafists got about 30% with secular and moderate islamists only about 20%. Ultra-conservative Salafists parties ideology was/is even worse than that of Muslim Brotherhood, so salafists/islamists parties had almost 80% of parliament.

    Now you tell me again please what's the point citing some liberal democrats and moderate islamists as alternatives, when they barely got 20% of votes so they were clearly not practical alternatives. How one of those cited(Mohamed ElBaradei,...) could have been a practical alternative without popular support? Worse, almost half of those 20% votes came from Copts.

    So I stick with what I said that  if the author doesn't have an agenda, he is extraordinary naive.

    Those same salafists are allowed to propagate their views and ideas openly in Egypt, while liberal reformers and others get jailed. The salafists who won the election are allied with the government and they supported Mubarak before they supported Sisi. Another important thing was that for much of the time, nonislamists boycotted the parliamentary election as they wanted a constitution first.This is why you had a close election during presidential race, but not parliamentary elections. Though I would say that the Muslim Brotherhood is supported by a majority, I was a bit surprised by the salafists, whose victories maybe because the Muslim Brotherhood prior to the elections made commitment to target 40-50.Another reason maybe the fact that the salafists are the largest civil society group by numbers, as the others activities were curtailed.
  • Sisi elected Egypt president by landslide says news
     Reply #25 - June 20, 2015, 10:34 PM



    let me cancel that also Wikipedia is a NOT a reference it is just a starting point to learn about a subject., In fact the numbers I put out in earlier post
    Quote
    ominee................Mohamed Morsi.........................Ahmed Shafik   
    Party....................Freedom and Justice....................Independent
    Popular vote...........13,230,131.....................................12,347,380
    Percentage...................51.73%.............................................48.27%

    is from the same link you have nbhb.. So let me give you better references from folders of CEMB   itself..

    Egypt Elections 101? Can someone explain_CEMB

    Egyptian Presidential Election Runoff_CEMB

    Muslim Brotherhood's Morsi Declared Winner of Egyptian Presidency_CEMB

    Morsi ousted by military in Egypt  

    One of the problem I see in Egypt is Egyptian elections itself.  I blame people of Egypt who did not participate in elections. In 2012  Egyptian election commission was fairly independent and elections were not rigged but here is the problem..

    Total valid votes         25,577,511    96.81%
    Invalid votes        843,252    3.19%
    Turnout        26,420,763    51.85%
    Abstentions      24,538,031    48.15%
    Registered voters    50,958,794    

    Almost 50% of people didn't even go for voting..  but I bet many of them participated in the recent strike against Morsi..   that is the first problem with elections.

     I wrote that two years ago just after Morsi was ousted by DICK HEAD with the direct support of  Saud suckers of sand land(BLOOD SUCKERS).,   Happy Juice and brainless AMRIKA govt Phoren policy

    Quote
    About your question, it depends what comes after 2 years of Morsi.  If it turns out to be like in Gaza, you have to understand why people are concerning about this.

     
    what depends and what   Gaza  are you talking about??  I am sure you know that  THERE IS NO GAZA or THERE IS NO ISRAEL with-in Egypt.  that assumption is preemptive., Who are concerned about elections is Egypt ? Sauds of sand land?? or LORDS OF JORDAN??
    Quote
    I hope you realize that I'm not backing up dictators. It's the alternative that I'm worried about.  

    well if you don't write anything about DICK HEADS .. then I say you are a indirect supporter.. And do you think I support Muslim Brothelhood??  anyways nbhb Please read that "Morsi ousted by military in Egypt " folder carefully  also read what Skywalker is saying above this post..

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Sisi elected Egypt president by landslide says news
     Reply #26 - June 21, 2015, 07:09 AM

    Those same salafists are allowed to propagate their views and ideas openly in Egypt, while liberal reformers and others get jailed. The salafists who won the election are allied with the government and they supported Mubarak before they supported Sisi. Another important thing was that for much of the time, nonislamists boycotted the parliamentary election as they wanted a constitution first.This is why you had a close election during presidential race, but not parliamentary elections. Though I would say that the Muslim Brotherhood is supported by a majority, I was a bit surprised by the salafists, whose victories maybe because the Muslim Brotherhood prior to the elections made commitment to target 40-50.Another reason maybe the fact that the salafists are the largest civil society group by numbers, as the others activities were curtailed.


    Well some of nonislamists boycotted the parliamentary elections. It doesn't mean the people did. Face it, this is what Egyptians have voted, as surprising as it was. 80% for islamists.

    Please read again the article and look at what alternatives the author is speaking of. Nothing but fairy tales. It was always between the army and the islamists. Now @Sky who do you think is less worse between these two?
  • Sisi elected Egypt president by landslide says news
     Reply #27 - June 21, 2015, 07:43 AM

    let me cancel that also Wikipedia is a NOT a reference it is just a starting point to learn about a subject., In fact the numbers I put out in earlier post is from the same link you have nbhb.. So let me give you better references from folders of CEMB   itself..

    And yet you gave me number from the same reference   grin12 . Okay do you have a reference that give other results in parliamentary elections than almost 80 percents for islamists/salafists?

    Egypt Elections 101? Can someone explain_CEMB

    Egyptian Presidential Election Runoff_CEMB

    Muslim Brotherhood's Morsi Declared Winner of Egyptian Presidency_CEMB

    Morsi ousted by military in Egypt  
     I wrote that two years ago just after Morsi was ousted by DICK HEAD with the direct support of  Saud suckers of sand land(BLOOD SUCKERS).,   Happy Juice and brainless AMRIKA govt Phoren policy

    I fully agree with your last statement. But, in all these links posted by you I read about people concerned about what an Islamist government means. And also concerned if will would have ever seen free elections again. You don't seem to take those concerns serious.

    what depends and what   Gaza  are you talking about??  I am sure you know that  THERE IS NO GAZA or THERE IS NO ISRAEL with-in Egypt.  that assumption is preemptive., Who are concerned about elections is Egypt ? Sauds of sand land?? or LORDS OF JORDAN?? well if you don't write anything about DICK HEADS .. then I say you are a indirect supporter.. And do you think I support Muslim Brothelhood??  anyways nbhb Please read that "Morsi ousted by military in Egypt " folder carefully  also read what Skywalker is saying above this post..

    So you say that my assumption is preemptive but you are assuming because I don't write about dick heads that I'm an indirect supporter.  grin12 .
    I think I was very clear that for me it is all about who is less worse between the army and Islamists, the only two practical alternatives on the ground. I'm sorry I won't consider liberal democrats a practical alternative, just fairy tales.
  • Sisi elected Egypt president by landslide says news
     Reply #28 - June 21, 2015, 09:10 AM

    Well some of nonislamists boycotted the parliamentary elections. It doesn't mean the people did. Face it, this is what Egyptians have voted, as surprising as it was. 80% for islamists.


    As I said earlier, I do think that Muslim Brotherhood ideology and traditional islamic views held by a majority, and Islamism. But 80 percent?  I would put it at 50-60,with islamists loosing support. The idea that its between the military and islamism is an idea that the military government wants to promote. Its an idea that Mubarak promoted. This how they keep their seat. Salafism is promoted freely in Egypt, liberal reformers are cracked down upon, so the choice becomes even narrower.

    The boycotts were frequently called by different groups.
    http://www.aljazeera.com/news/middleeast/2011/09/2011928234830274426.html
    In the parliamentary elections for the upper house one of the largest parties within the secular liberal camp boycotted the race. The call for boycott is significant, as its a message to voters to stay home.

    Later, in the second parliamentary elections (that wasn't held) called by Mursi, the boycotts intensified
    http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/feb/26/egyptian-opposition-boycott-elections

    Though I would say that traditional Sharia views are dominant, I would disagree that they are at 80% as the parties called for electoral boycott. When parties call for boycotts, it isn?t just going to be them not running for elections, its people staying home.
  • Sisi elected Egypt president by landslide says news
     Reply #29 - June 21, 2015, 10:15 AM

    Though I would say that traditional Sharia views are dominant, I would disagree that they are at 80% as the parties called for electoral boycott. When parties call for boycotts, it isn?t just going to be them not running for elections, its people staying home.

    80% was what has resulted from 2011-2012 parliamentary elections. Even if we take in account some parties boycotts(which doesn't turn automatically in people boycott) and Muslim Brotherhood eroding image, it's still a long way to less than 50% for islamists. Maybe it could have happened... and maybe army takeover was wrong..., but you have to understand those with my position, that we could have never had free elections again or in any case it could have got even worse than it is now with Islamists in power. Many people genuinely belief this. 
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