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Theme Changer

 Topic: Islam before Muhammad

 (Read 3152 times)
  • 12 Next page « Previous thread | Next thread »
  • Islam before Muhammad
     OP - April 16, 2014, 08:13 PM

    According to the Wikipedia page on Allah


    Quote
    Many inscriptions containing the name Allah have been discovered in Northern and Southern Arabia as early as the 5th century B.C., including Lihyanitic, Thamudic and South Arabian inscriptions. [24][25][26][27]

    The name Allah or Alla was found in the Epic of Atrahasis engraved on several tablets dating back to around 1700 BC in Babylon, which showed that he was being worshipped as a high deity among other gods who were considered to be his brothers but taking orders from him. [28]

    Dumuzid the Shepherd, a king of the 1st Dynasty of Uruk named on the Sumerian King List, was later over-venerated so that people started associating him with "Alla" and the Babylonian god Tammuz. [29]

    Nabataeans

    The name Allah was used by Nabataeans in compound names, such as "Abd Allah" (The Servant/Slave of Allah), "Aush Allah" (The Faith of Allah), "Amat Allah" (The She-Servant of Allah), "Hab Allah" (Beloved of Allah), "Han Allah" (Allah is gracious), "Shalm Allah" (Peace of Allah), while the name "Wahab Allah" (The Gift of Allah) was found throughout the entire region of the Nabataean kingdom. [30][31]

    From Nabataean inscriptions, Allah seems to have been regarded as a "High and Main God", while other deities were considered to be mediators before Allah and of a second status, which was the same case of the[32]

    According to Marshall Hodgson, it seems that in the pre-Islamic times, some Arab Christians made pilgrimage to the Ka‘bah, a pagan temple at that time, honoring Allah there as God the Creator. [41]

    Some archaeological excavation quests have led to the discovery of ancient Pre-Islamic inscriptions and tombs made by Arabic-speaking Christians in the ruins of a church at Umm el-Jimal in Northern Jordan, which contained references to Allah as the proper name of God, and some of the graves contained names such as "Abd Allah" which means "the servant/slave of Allah". [42][43][44]

    The name Allah can be found countless times in the reports and the lists of names of Christian martyrs in South Arabia, as reported by antique Syriac documents of the names of those martyrs from the era of the Himyarite & Aksumite kingdoms. [45][46]

    A Christian leader named Abd Allah ibn Abu Bakr ibn Muhammad was martyred in Najran in 523 AD, and he had worn a ring that said "Allah is my lord". [46][47]

    In an inscription of Christian martyrion dated back to 512 AD, references to Allah can be found in both Arabic and Aramaic, which called him "Allah" and "Alaha", and the inscription starts with the statement "By the Help of Allah". [46][48][49]
    In Pre-Islamic Gospels, the name used for God was "Allah", as evidenced by some discovered Arabic versions of the New Testament written by Arab Christians during the Pre-Islamic era in Northern and Southern Arabia. [46][50][51]

    Pre-Islamic Arab Christians have been reported to have raised the battle cry "Ya La Ibad Allah" (O slaves of Allah) to invoke each other into battle. [52]

    "Allah" was also mentioned in pre-Islamic Christian poems by some Ghassanid and Tanukhid poets in Syria and Northern Arabia.

    There is also a theory that Jesus commanded his followers to be Muslims in Aramaic. It doesn't seem to make sense to me as the Aramaic word mushlam doesn't mean submission, it just comes from the same root word, plus a translation of a translation of a supposedly corrupted bible is unlikely to be accurate, but my knowledge of semitic languages is nonexistent so I might be wrong.

    http://www.answering-christianity.com/luke6_40.htm

    So what do you make of this? Plagiarism on Mohammad's part, or evidence that Islam is indeed the worlds oldest religion

  • Islam before Muhammad
     Reply #1 - April 16, 2014, 08:17 PM

    Ok, and?

    Devious, treacherous, murderous, neanderthal, sub-human of the West. bunny
  • Islam before Muhammad
     Reply #2 - April 16, 2014, 09:06 PM

    Ok, and?


    I just think the idea of Christians praying to Allah and making hajj oddly similar to what Islam says Jesus's original message was
  • Islam before Muhammad
     Reply #3 - April 16, 2014, 09:09 PM

    Ok. So Arabic-speaking Christians praying to "the God" means what?

    Devious, treacherous, murderous, neanderthal, sub-human of the West. bunny
  • Islam before Muhammad
     Reply #4 - April 16, 2014, 10:31 PM

    Quote
    Ok. So Arabic-speaking Christians praying to "the God" means what?

    Ok, and?


    A careful historical investigation  of that OP from Lowkizzy is extremely important to educate the Bums and dumbos on the origin of word Allah, It means that Allah god was there before Islam., and those Pagan Arabs had a god named allah., Most of these fools who think Allah is originated after Muhammad became prophet of Islam are wrong.  And those idiots in Indonesia are wrong., Christians have the right use the word Allah to represent their god...

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Islam before Muhammad
     Reply #5 - April 16, 2014, 10:59 PM

    I think what it does bring into vision is the environment that Islam grew out of, making it an organic evolution of ideas not a splat in the sandy ocean that suddenly miraculously appeared. Corruption of the mushlam may have occurred and the environment there was heavily likely to spur some kind of occurrence of a leading figure at some point funnelling some kind of 'higher power'.

    This with Tom Holland's stuff though not fully convincing to me, sounds more convincing than the usual accepted history spouted by Muslims and non-Muslim apologists for the normative reading of history. I certainly think that the qu'ran is very much not in its original form and that the character of Muhammad has been very much mythologised, enhanced and embellished. There is the possibility that many people were merged to become this iconic Muhammad; "praiseworthy one"; persona; semi-godlike in nature in the eyes of believers. 
  • Islam before Muhammad
     Reply #6 - April 16, 2014, 11:26 PM

    A careful historical investigation  of that OP from Lowkizzy is extremely important to educate the Bums and dumbos on the origin of word Allah, It means that Allah god was there before Islam., and those Pagan Arabs had a god named allah., Most of these fools who think Allah is originated after Muhammad became prophet of Islam are wrong.  And those idiots in Indonesia are wrong., Christians have the right use the word Allah to represent their god...


    Yeez, since you are the portable library of this forum, can you recommend any (preferably free) books on the above issue?
    I really want to read "The death of a prophet" by shoemaker... but it's a university press so the price is severely inflated.

    thanks.

    (Books other than in the shadow of the sword would be appreciated)

    My mind runs, I can never catch it even if I get a head start.
  • Islam before Muhammad
     Reply #7 - April 17, 2014, 12:28 AM

    Yeez, since you are the portable library of this forum, can you recommend any (preferably free) books on the above issue?
    I really want to read "The death of a prophet" by shoemaker... but it's a university press so the price is severely inflated.

    thanks.

    (Books other than in the shadow of the sword would be appreciated)


    Hi Qtian, here is a link to pdf files of the chapter of that book by Shoemaker from a US Uni I believe.

    https://muse.jhu.edu/books/9780812205138

    CANCEL - not free - only accessible through subscription
  • Islam before Muhammad
     Reply #8 - April 17, 2014, 12:41 AM

    Hey Lily, thanks for trying, I've already encountered project muse in my extensive search Tongue

    I may just buy the book tbh.

    My mind runs, I can never catch it even if I get a head start.
  • Islam before Muhammad
     Reply #9 - April 17, 2014, 12:46 AM

    --------------------------
  • Islam before Muhammad
     Reply #10 - April 17, 2014, 12:51 AM

    That's great, I would really appreciate it Smiley

    My mind runs, I can never catch it even if I get a head start.
  • Islam before Muhammad
     Reply #11 - April 17, 2014, 01:01 AM

    Scrap that, my uni is signed up to that website but not to that source unfortunately!
  • Islam before Muhammad
     Reply #12 - April 17, 2014, 01:06 AM

    Back to square one then, I will just buy it  wacko

    My mind runs, I can never catch it even if I get a head start.
  • Islam before Muhammad
     Reply #13 - April 17, 2014, 03:58 AM

    Because there was diety called Allah before Muhammad, does not mean that Islam existed before Muhammad. Its like saying everyone is born a Muslim, which is utter nonsense. The truth is that Muhammad was born a pagan, so were almost all the Arabs during his lifetime. Islam is the religion created by Muhammad.

    वासुदैव कुटुम्बकम्
    Entire World is One Family
    سارا سنسار ايک پريوار ہے
  • Islam before Muhammad
     Reply #14 - April 17, 2014, 08:07 AM

    Because there was diety called Allah before Muhammad, does not mean that Islam existed before Muhammad. Its like saying everyone is born a Muslim, which is utter nonsense. The truth is that Muhammad was born a pagan, so were almost all the Arabs during his lifetime. Islam is the religion created by Muhammad.

    Ram do not blame Muhammad for those underlined words. Do have any idea who actually first stated that and why?

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Islam before Muhammad
     Reply #15 - April 28, 2014, 06:49 PM

    Ram do not blame Muhammad for those underlined words. Do have any idea who actually first stated that and why?


    Who was it Yeez?
  • Islam before Muhammad
     Reply #16 - April 28, 2014, 06:56 PM

    Mr. yeezevee, what makes you say that I am blaming Muhammad? I just stated a fact. The fact is that there was no Islam before Muhammad, that's all.

    वासुदैव कुटुम्बकम्
    Entire World is One Family
    سارا سنسار ايک پريوار ہے
  • Islam before Muhammad
     Reply #17 - April 28, 2014, 10:09 PM

    Mr. yeezevee, what makes you say that I am blaming Muhammad? I just stated a fact. The fact is that there was no Islam before Muhammad, that's all.

     Oh~   o.k. let us not blame that guy ((  whoever that Phantom of Islam was., I am not even sure he even existed ))   for every  stupid saying that we find in some Islamic sayings/websites...

    Who was it Yeez?

    I think it started by Ahmad Deedat and spread by that Indian zakir naik  guy .,

    The basic Islamic logic goes like this., 

       "this Adam Monkey prophet is mentioned in Quran,  so Islam started from that monkey..  "   Adam started mankind hence everybody who came after this Adam Monkey prophet is/was Muslim....

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Islam before Muhammad
     Reply #18 - April 28, 2014, 11:30 PM

    Yes, I was taught Islam is the natural state, and Adam first with it.

    Don't let Hitler have the street.
  • Islam before Muhammad
     Reply #19 - April 29, 2014, 09:33 AM

    ^

    There's a fun bit in Eusebius's History of the Church ( early 4th century CE ), where he makes more or less the same argument that Christianity was the original religion.
  • Islam before Muhammad
     Reply #20 - April 29, 2014, 01:22 PM

    Every religion claims it is the natural state of man, or else they would indirectly (or directly) admit the religion was man-made.  Smiley

    "The healthiest people I know are those who are the first to label themselves fucked up." - three
  • Islam before Muhammad
     Reply #21 - April 29, 2014, 02:12 PM

    Men created Gods, many versions of Gods. That is why we have so many different versions. I don't believe that there is only one God. Every religion has its own God. The world is too complex for any one God, there has to be some sort of team work.

    वासुदैव कुटुम्बकम्
    Entire World is One Family
    سارا سنسار ايک پريوار ہے
  • Islam before Muhammad
     Reply #22 - April 29, 2014, 02:26 PM

    .................. The world is too complex for any one God, there has to be some sort of team work..........

    why Mr. RAM?   well that may be your hindu thing  and you have the right to believe.,   but do you really  need TEAM OF RASCALS to mess up people ? 

    how about having none??

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Islam before Muhammad
     Reply #23 - April 30, 2014, 02:08 AM

    Every religion claims it is the natural state of man, or else they would indirectly (or directly) admit the religion was man-made.  Smiley


    Oh my goodness, of course. Sometimes the obvious flies over me, laughing.

    Don't let Hitler have the street.
  • Islam before Muhammad
     Reply #24 - April 30, 2014, 02:36 AM

    Sometimes the obvious flies over me, laughing.

    That's a great line.

    And the best description yet of my powers of insight.
  • Islam before Muhammad
     Reply #25 - April 30, 2014, 02:51 AM

    yeezevee, you crack me up. Please look up the meaning of the word sarcasm. Thanks

    वासुदैव कुटुम्बकम्
    Entire World is One Family
    سارا سنسار ايک پريوار ہے
  • Islam before Muhammad
     Reply #26 - April 30, 2014, 03:19 AM

    That's a great line.

    And the best description yet of my powers of insight.


    Well thank you. I like it, too.

    Don't let Hitler have the street.
  • Islam before Muhammad
     Reply #27 - June 01, 2018, 02:13 PM

    well let me activate this folder to learn/put some history in it..

    Quote
    1).  A STYLISTIC AND COMPARATIVE STUDY OF UNPUBLISHED PRE-ISLAMIC STONE SCULPTURES FROM ARABIA By Hamid Ibrahim A1-Mazroo ...This Thesis is Submitted for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy at the. Institute of Archaeology, University College, London. 1990

    2). The origin of Arabs:Middle Eastern ethnicity and myth-making by Peter Webb  

    3). The Arabic Bible before Islam – By Clare Wilde

    4). Before Islam: When Saudi Arabia Was a Jewish Kingdom  by Ariel David

    5). Pre-Islamic Arabia


    and then this  Arabia before Islam from that big  Al-islam.org

    Quote
    Arabia before Islam ..Part -1

    In writing the history of Islam, it is customary to begin with a survey of the political, economic, social and religious conditions of Arabia on the eve of the Proclamation by Muhammad (may God bless him and his Ahlul-Bait) of his mission as Messenger of God.

    It is the second convention of the historians (the first being to give a geographical description of the region). I shall also abide by this convention, and will review briefly, the general conditions in Arabia in the late sixth and early seventh century A.D.

    Political Conditions in Arabia

    The most remarkable feature of the political life of Arabia before Islam was the total absence of political organization in any form. With the exception of Yemen in the south-west, no part of the Arabian peninsula had any government at any time, and the Arabs never acknowledged any authority other than the authority of the chiefs of their tribes. The authority of the tribal chiefs, however, rested, in most cases, on their character and personality, and was moral rather than political.

    The modern student of history finds it incredible that the Arabs lived, generation after generation, century after century, without a government of any kind. Since there was no government, there was no law and no order.

    The only law of the land was lawlessness. In the event a crime was committed, the injured party took law in its own hands, and tried to administer “justice” to the offender. This system led very frequently to acts of horrendous cruelty.

    If the Arab ever exercised any modicum of restraint, it was not because of any susceptibility he had to questions of right or wrong but because of the fear of provoking reprisals and vendetta. Vendetta consumed whole generations of Arabs.

    Since there were no such things as police, courts or judges, the only protection a man could find from his enemies, was in his own tribe. The tribe had an obligation to protect its members even if they had committed crimes. Tribalism or ‘asabiyya (the clan spirit) took precedence over ethics. A tribe that failed to protect its members from their enemies, exposed itself to ridicule, obloquy and contempt. Ethics, of course, did not enter the picture anywhere.

    Since Arabia did not have a government, and since the Arabs were anarchists by instinct, they were locked up in ceaseless warfare. War was a permanent institution of the Arabian society. The desert could support only a limited number of people, and the state of inter-tribal war maintained a rigid control over the growth of population. But the Arabs themselves did not see war in this light.

    To them, war was a pastime or rather a dangerous sport, or a species of tribal drama, waged by professionals, according to old and gallant codes, while the “audience” cheered. Eternal peace held no appeal for them, and war provided an escape from drudgery and from the monotony of life in the desert.

    They, therefore, courted the excitement of the clash of arms. War gave them an opportunity to display their skills at archery, fencing and horsemanship, and also, in war, they could distinguish themselves by their heroism and at the same time win glory and honor for their tribes. In many cases, the Arabs fought for the sake of fighting, whether or not there was a cause belli.

    G. E. Grunebaum

    “In the century before the rise of Islam the tribes dissipated all their energies in tribal guerrilla fighting, all against all.” (Classical Islam – A History 600-1258 – 1970)

    The nomadic tribes ranged over the peninsula and plundered the caravans and the small settlements. Many caravans and villages bought immunity from these raids by paying a fixed amount of money to the nomadic freebooters.

    It is important to grasp the fact that on the eve of the birth of Islam there was no government at any level in Arabia, and this fact may even have affected the rise of Islam itself.The total absence of government, even in its most rudimentary form, was a phenomenon so extraordinary that it has been noted and commented upon by many orientalists, among them:

    D. S. Margoliouth

    “Arabia would have remained pagan had there been a man in Mecca who could strike a blow; who would act. But many as were Mohammed's ill-wishers, there was not one of them who had this sort of courage; and (as has been seen) there was no magistracy by which he could be tried.” (Mohammed and the Rise of Islam, 1931)

    Maxime Rodinson

    “Manslaughter carried severe penalties according to the unwritten law of the desert. In practice the free Arabs were bound by no written code of law, and no state existed to enforce its statutes with the backing of a police force.The only protection for a man's life was the certainty established by custom, that it would be dearly bought. Blood for blood and a life for a life. The vendetta, tha'r in Arabic, is one of the pillars of Bedouin society.” (Mohammed, 1971)

    Herbert J. Muller

    “In Mohammed's Arabia there was no state – there were only scattered independent tribes and towns. The Prophet formed his own state, and he gave it a sacred law prescribed by Allah.” (The Loom of History, 1958)

    The population of Arabia consisted of two main divisions, sedentary and nomadic. Hijaz and South Arabia were dotted with many small and a few large towns. The rest of the country had a floating population composed of Bedouins.

    They were backward in the civil and political sense but they were also a source of anxiety and fear for the sedentary population. They lived as pirates of the desert, and they were notorious for their unrestrained individualism and anarchic tribal particularism.

    The more important tribes exercised a certain amount of authority in their respective areas. In Makkah the dominant tribe was the Quraysh; in Yathrib, the dominant tribes were the Arab tribes of Aus and Khazraj, and the Jewish tribes of Nadheer, Qaynuqaa and Qurayza. The Quraysh of Makkah considered themselves superior to the Bedouins but the latter had only contempt for the town-dwellers who for them were only a “nation of shopkeepers.”

    All Arabs were notorious for certain characteristics such as arrogance, conceit, boastfulness, vindictiveness and excessive love of plunder. Their arrogance was partly responsible for their failure to establish a state of their own. They lacked political discipline, and until the rise of Islam, never acknowledged any authority as paramount in Arabia.

    They acknowledged the authority of a man who led them into a foray but he could command their obedience only if they had an assurance of receiving a fair share of the booty, and his authority lapsed as soon as the expedition was over. 



    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Islam before Muhammad
     Reply #28 - June 01, 2018, 02:16 PM

    Arabia before Islam ..Part -2
    Quote
    Economic Conditions

    Economically, the Jews were the leaders of Arabia. They were the owners of the best arable lands in Hijaz, and they were the best farmers in the country. They were also the entrepreneurs of such industries as existed in Arabia in those days, and they enjoyed a monopoly of the armaments industry.

    Slavery was an economic institution of the Arabs. Male and female slaves were sold and bought like animals, and they formed the most depressed class of the Arabian society.

    The most powerful class of the Arabs was made up by the capitalists and money-lenders. The rates of interest which they charged on loans were exorbitant, and were especially designed to make them richer and richer, and the borrowers poorer and poorer.

    The most important urban centers of Arabia were Makkah and Yathrib, both in Hijaz. The citizens of Makkah were mostly merchants, traders and money-lenders. Their caravans traveled in summer to Syria and in winter to Yemen.

    They also traveled to Bahrain in the east and to Iraq in the northeast. The caravan trade was basic to the economy of Makkah, and its organization called for considerable skill, experience and ability.

    R. V. C. Bodley

    The arrivals and departures of caravans were important events in the lives of the Meccans. Almost everyone in Mecca had some kind of investment in the fortunes of the thousands of camels, the hundreds of men, horses, and donkeys which went out with hides, raisins, and silver bars, and came back with oils, perfumes and manufactured goods from Syria, Egypt and Persia, and with spices and gold from the south. (The Messenger, 1946, p. 31)

    In Yathrib, the Arabs made their living by farming, and the Jews made theirs as businessmen and industrialists. But the Jews were not exclusively businessmen and industrialists; among them also there were many farmers, and they had brought much waste land under cultivation.

    Economically, socially and politically, Hijaz was the most important province in Arabia in the early seventh century.

    Francesco Gabrieli

    On the eve of Islam the most complex and advanced human aggregate of the Arabian peninsula lived in the city of the Quraysh. The hour of the south Arab kingdoms, of Petra and Palmyra, had passed for some time in the history of Arabia. Now the future was being prepared there, in Hijaz (The Arabs – A Compact History, 1963)

    The Arabs and the Jews both practiced usury. Many among them were professional usurers; they lived on the interest they charged on their loans.

    E. A. Belyaev

    “Usury (riba) was widely practiced in Mecca, for in order to participate in the profitable caravan trade many a Meccan who had only a modest income had to resort to usurers; despite the high interest, he could hope to benefit after the safe return of the caravan. The richer merchants were both traders and usurers.

    Money-lenders usually took a dinar for a dinar, a dirhem for a dirhem, in other words, 100 per cent interest. In the Koran 3:130, Allah addressing the faithful, prescribes:

    'Do not practice usury doubled twofold.'

    This could mean that interests of 200 or even 400 per cent were demanded. The nets of Meccan usury caught not only fellow-citizens and tribesmen but also members of the Hijazi

    Bedouin tribes active in the Meccan trade. As in ancient Athens, ‘the principal means of oppressing the people's freedom were money and usury.” (Arabs, Islam and the Arab Caliphate in the Early Middle Ages, 1969)

    Social Conditions

    Arabia was a male-dominated society. Women had no status of any kind other than as sex objects.The number of women a man could marry was not fixed. When a man died, his son “inherited” all his wives except his own mother.

    A savage custom of the Arabs was to bury their female infants alive. Even if an Arab did not wish to bury his daughter alive, he still had to uphold this “honorable” tradition, being unable to resist social pressures.

    Drunkenness was a common vice of the Arabs. With drunkenness went their gambling. They were compulsive drinkers and compulsive gamblers. The relations of the sexes were extremely loose. Many women sold sex to make their living since there was little else they could do. These women flew flags on their houses, and were called “ladies of the flags” (dhat-er-rayyat).

    Sayyid Qutb of Egypt in his book, Milestones, published by the International Islamic Federation of Student Organizations, Salimiah, Kuwait in 1978 (pp. 48, 49), has quoted the famous traditionalist, Imam Bukhari, on the institution of marriage in Arabia before Islam as follows:

    The Shihab (az-Suhri) said: 'Urwah b. az-Zubayr informed him that Aishah, the wife of the Prophet (God bless and preserve him), informed him that marriage in the Jahiliyah was of four types:

    1. One was the marriage of people as it is today, where a man betroths his ward or his daughter to another man, and the latter assigns a dower (bridewealth) to her and then marries her.

    2. Another type was where a man said to his wife when she was purified from her menses, ‘Send to N and ask to have intercourse with him;' her husband then stays away from her and does not touch her at all until it is clear that she is pregnant from that (other) man with whom she sought intercourse.

    When it is clear that she is pregnant, her husband has intercourse with her if he wants. He acts thus simply from the desire for a noble child. This type of marriage was (known as) nikah al-istibda, the marriage of seeking intercourse.

    3. Another type was when a group (raht) of less than ten men used to visit the same woman and all of them had to have intercourse with her. If she became pregnant and bore a child, when some nights had passed after the birth she sent for them, and not a man of them might refuse.

    When they had come together in her presence, she would say to them, ‘You (pl.) know the result of your acts; I have borne a child and he is your (sing.) child, N.' – naming whoever she will by his name. Her child is attached to him, and the man may not refuse.

    4. The fourth type is when many men frequent a woman, and she does not keep herself from any who comes to her. These women are the baghaya (prostitutes). They used to set up at their doors banners forming a sign. Whoever wanted them went in to them. If one of them conceived and bore a child, they gathered together to her and summoned the physiognomists.

    sThen they attached her child to the man whom they thought (the father), and the child remained attached to him and was called his son, no objection to this course being possible. When Muhammad (God bless and preserve him) came preaching the truth, he destroyed all the types of marriage of the Jahiliya except that which people practice today.

     

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Islam before Muhammad
     Reply #29 - June 01, 2018, 02:20 PM

    Arabia before Islam ..Part -3
    Quote
      The State of Religion in Pre-Islamic Arabia

    The period in the Arabian history which preceded the birth of Islam is known as the Times of Ignorance. Judging by the beliefs and the practices of the pagan Arabs, it appears that it was a most appropriate name. The Arabs were the devotees of a variety of “religions” which can be classified into the following categories.

    1. Idol-worshippers or polytheists. Most of the Arabs were idolaters. They worshipped numerous idols and each tribe had its own idol or idols and fetishes. They had turned the Kaaba in Makkah, which according to tradition, had been built by the Prophet Abraham and his son, Ismael, and was dedicated by them to the service of One God, into a heathen pantheon housing 360 idols of stone and wood.

    2. Atheists This group was composed of the materialists and believed that the world was eternal.

    3. Zindiqs They were influenced by the Persian doctrine of dualism in nature. They believed that there were two gods representing the twin forces of good and evil or light and darkness, and both were locked up in an unending struggle for supremacy.

    4. Sabines. They worshipped the stars.

    5. Jews When the Romans destroyed Jerusalem in A.D. 70, and drove the Jews out of Palestine and Syria, many of them found new homes in Hijaz in Arabia. Under their influence, many Arabs also became converts to Judaism. Their strong centers were the towns of Yathrib, Khayber, Fadak and Umm-ul-Qura.

    6. Christians. The Romans had converted the north Arabian tribe of Ghassan to Christianity. Some clans of Ghassan had migrated to and had settled in Hijaz. In the south, there were many Christians in Yemen where the creed was originally brought by the Ethiopian invaders. Their strong center was the town of Najran.

    7. Monotheists There was a small group of monotheists present in Arabia on the eve of the rise of Islam. Its members did not worship idols, and they were the followers of the Prophet Abraham. The members of the families of Muhammad, the future prophet, and Ali ibn Abi Talib, the future caliph, and most members of their clan – the Banu Hashim – belonged to this group. 

     

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
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