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Theme Changer

 Topic: Did anyone read the Bible?

 (Read 1959 times)
  • 12 Next page « Previous thread | Next thread »
  • Did anyone read the Bible?
     OP - February 19, 2014, 09:52 PM

    I was bored... I thought about reading the Bible. I got even more bored and barely made it through Genesis, too much reading involved. No wonder there are always preachers making money by reading this crap, no one actually wants to spend their time reading this bullshit (unless they read it for the money). If the Bible (and the Qur'an) are the divinely inspired words of God, then why are they so repetitive and boring?

    If there's anyone in this forum who has read the Bible, please tell me what you thought of it.

    Me: Hey Allah!
    Allah: KAFIR!
  • Did anyone read the Bible?
     Reply #1 - February 19, 2014, 09:54 PM

    I'm reading it in order now. Haven't got much further than you, though I have read bits and pieces in the past.
  • Did anyone read the Bible?
     Reply #2 - February 19, 2014, 10:05 PM

    Quote
    If the Bible (and the Qur'an) are the divinely inspired words of God, then why are they so repetitive and boring?

     

    Exactly there are novelists as well as non fiction writers who's excellent writing style and content puts these holy books to shame.



    It's the most obvious sign of the man made orgins of these books. Surely an omnipotent being wouldn't just produce a boring religious scripture that contains no information or arguments that would make it stand out amongst the plethora of other boring religious scriptures.

    In my opinion a life without curiosity is not a life worth living
  • Did anyone read the Bible?
     Reply #3 - February 19, 2014, 10:18 PM

    I've read it a few times when I believed in christianity. I found it quite boring in many areas, confusing in some parts and downright disgusting in other bits.
    However I tried very hard not to admit this to myself and tried to read it without doubts and boredom taking over. Obviously it didn't work  Grin

  • Did anyone read the Bible?
     Reply #4 - February 19, 2014, 10:25 PM

    My pathetic contribution:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U-_EX8KKznQ

    No free mixing of the sexes is permitted on these forums or via PM or the various chat groups that are operating.

    Women must write modestly and all men must lower their case.

    http://www.ummah.com/forum/showthread.php?425649-Have-some-Hayaa-%28modesty-shame%29-people!
  • Did anyone read the Bible?
     Reply #5 - February 19, 2014, 11:14 PM

    I've read it front to cover three times, actually.  Three different versions mind you.
  • Did anyone read the Bible?
     Reply #6 - February 19, 2014, 11:25 PM

    Don't bother with the Old Testament, that is utter crap. From a literature standing, the New Testament has some pretty decent passages.

    Some of the common expressions that we have in Western languages originate from the New Testament. Stuff like "giving someone the shirt off your back", "turn the other cheek", "those that live by the sword die by the sword", "the salt of the earth", etc.

    But really the only part that I would consider worth reading is Mathew 5: 38-44

  • Did anyone read the Bible?
     Reply #7 - February 19, 2014, 11:36 PM

    I prefer this: http://www.thebricktestament.com
  • Did anyone read the Bible?
     Reply #8 - February 19, 2014, 11:47 PM

    I like the King James, myself  Well, like as in if I'm going to read a bible that's the one I'd choose. The Song of Solomon isn't bad, I actually think it's quite beautiful in ways. But, you're still on Genesis. Let me know when you get to the human/angel sex. Afro

    `But I don't want to go among mad people,' Alice remarked.
     `Oh, you can't help that,' said the Cat: `we're all mad here. I'm mad.  You're mad.'
     `How do you know I'm mad?' said Alice.
     `You must be,' said the Cat, `or you wouldn't have come here.'
  • Did anyone read the Bible?
     Reply #9 - February 19, 2014, 11:48 PM


     Cheesy

    `But I don't want to go among mad people,' Alice remarked.
     `Oh, you can't help that,' said the Cat: `we're all mad here. I'm mad.  You're mad.'
     `How do you know I'm mad?' said Alice.
     `You must be,' said the Cat, `or you wouldn't have come here.'
  • Did anyone read the Bible?
     Reply #10 - February 19, 2014, 11:53 PM

    Quod I've missed you  Afro

    No free mixing of the sexes is permitted on these forums or via PM or the various chat groups that are operating.

    Women must write modestly and all men must lower their case.

    http://www.ummah.com/forum/showthread.php?425649-Have-some-Hayaa-%28modesty-shame%29-people!
  • Did anyone read the Bible?
     Reply #11 - February 20, 2014, 12:00 AM

    The Song of Solomon is beautifully romantic.  Go figure that god is never mentioned in it.
  • Did anyone read the Bible?
     Reply #12 - February 20, 2014, 12:03 AM

    The bible should be for over 18s only. Children might think it's real.

    `But I don't want to go among mad people,' Alice remarked.
     `Oh, you can't help that,' said the Cat: `we're all mad here. I'm mad.  You're mad.'
     `How do you know I'm mad?' said Alice.
     `You must be,' said the Cat, `or you wouldn't have come here.'
  • Did anyone read the Bible?
     Reply #13 - February 20, 2014, 12:04 AM



    Checked it out, it doesn't seem so boring now Smiley I feel like reading the whole thing now! Cheesy

    Let me know when you get to the human/angel sex. Afro


    Will do!  Wink

    Me: Hey Allah!
    Allah: KAFIR!
  • Did anyone read the Bible?
     Reply #14 - February 20, 2014, 12:05 AM

    The Brick Testament is how I read most of the Bible the first time around.  Each other time I just imagined it in lego format.
  • Did anyone read the Bible?
     Reply #15 - February 20, 2014, 01:27 AM

    I can relate to the futility expressed in Ecclesiastes:

    “Meaningless! Meaningless!”
        says the Teacher.
    “Utterly meaningless!
        Everything is meaningless.”

    All things are wearisome,
        more than one can say.
    The eye never has enough of seeing,
        nor the ear its fill of hearing.
    What has been will be again,
        what has been done will be done again;
        there is nothing new under the sun.
    Is there anything of which one can say,
        “Look! This is something new”?
    It was here already, long ago;
        it was here before our time.
    No one remembers the former generations,
        and even those yet to come
    will not be remembered
        by those who follow them.

    So I hated life, because the work that is done under the sun was grievous to me. All of it is meaningless, a chasing after the wind. I hated all the things I had toiled for under the sun, because I must leave them to the one who comes after me. And who knows whether that person will be wise or foolish? Yet they will have control over all the fruit of my toil into which I have poured my effort and skill under the sun. This too is meaningless. So my heart began to despair over all my toilsome labor under the sun. For a person may labor with wisdom, knowledge and skill, and then they must leave all they own to another who has not toiled for it. This too is meaningless and a great misfortune. What do people get for all the toil and anxious striving with which they labor under the sun? All their days their work is grief and pain; even at night their minds do not rest. This too is meaningless.
  • Did anyone read the Bible?
     Reply #16 - February 20, 2014, 01:36 AM

    Ohh. Redriding, thanks for sharing that. I've had similar despairing feelings for such reasons...but you find that after all of that, what good does despair do? Even that itself is pointless, so all in all, aiming to smile each day and share happiness, being productive etc makes more sense.

    "Between stimulus and response there is a space. In that space is our power to choose our response. In our response lies our growth and our freedom." - Viktor E. Frankl

    'Life is just the extreme expression of complex chemistry' - Neil deGrasse Tyson
  • Did anyone read the Bible?
     Reply #17 - February 20, 2014, 01:40 AM

    It's difficult at times, but that's part of the package of life, we've ups and downs and keep pushing in some direction or another.

    "Between stimulus and response there is a space. In that space is our power to choose our response. In our response lies our growth and our freedom." - Viktor E. Frankl

    'Life is just the extreme expression of complex chemistry' - Neil deGrasse Tyson
  • Did anyone read the Bible?
     Reply #18 - February 20, 2014, 02:57 AM

    Ecclesiastes is my favorite biblical book by far.
  • Did anyone read the Bible?
     Reply #19 - February 20, 2014, 03:16 AM

    Quote
    Cant.1
    [1] The song of songs, which is Solomon's.
    [2] Let him kiss me with the kisses of his mouth: for thy love is better than wine.
    [3] Because of the savour of thy good ointments thy name is as ointment poured forth, therefore do the virgins love thee.
    [4] Draw me, we will run after thee: the king hath brought me into his chambers: we will be glad and rejoice in thee, we will remember thy love more than wine: the upright love thee.
    [5] I am black, but comely, O ye daughters of Jerusalem, as the tents of Kedar, as the curtains of Solomon.
    [6] Look not upon me, because I am black, because the sun hath looked upon me: my mother's children were angry with me; they made me the keeper of the vineyards; but mine own vineyard have I not kept.
    [7] Tell me, O thou whom my soul loveth, where thou feedest, where thou makest thy flock to rest at noon: for why should I be as one that turneth aside by the flocks of thy companions?
    [8] If thou know not, O thou fairest among women, go thy way forth by the footsteps of the flock, and feed thy kids beside the shepherds' tents.
    [9] I have compared thee, O my love, to a company of horses in Pharaoh's chariots.
    [10] Thy cheeks are comely with rows of jewels, thy neck with chains of gold.
    [11] We will make thee borders of gold with studs of silver.
    [12] While the king sitteth at his table, my spikenard sendeth forth the smell thereof.
    [13] A bundle of myrrh is my wellbeloved unto me; he shall lie all night betwixt my breasts.
    [14] My beloved is unto me as a cluster of camphire in the vineyards of En-gedi.
    [15] Behold, thou art fair, my love; behold, thou art fair; thou hast doves' eyes.
    [16] Behold, thou art fair, my beloved, yea, pleasant: also our bed is green.
    [17] The beams of our house are cedar, and our rafters of fir.


    Cant.2
    [1] I am the rose of Sharon, and the lily of the valleys.
    [2] As the lily among thorns, so is my love among the daughters.
    [3] As the apple tree among the trees of the wood, so is my beloved among the sons. I sat down under his shadow with great delight, and his fruit was sweet to my taste.
    [4] He brought me to the banqueting house, and his banner over me was love.
    [5] Stay me with flagons, comfort me with apples: for I am sick of love.
    [6] His left hand is under my head, and his right hand doth embrace me.
    [7] I charge you, O ye daughters of Jerusalem, by the roes, and by the hinds of the field, that ye stir not up, nor awake my love, till he please.
    [8] The voice of my beloved! behold, he cometh leaping upon the mountains, skipping upon the hills.
    [9] My beloved is like a roe or a young hart: behold, he standeth behind our wall, he looketh forth at the windows, shewing himself through the lattice.
    [10] My beloved spake, and said unto me, Rise up, my love, my fair one, and come away.
    [11] For, lo, the winter is past, the rain is over and gone;
    [12] The flowers appear on the earth; the time of the singing of birds is come, and the voice of the turtle is heard in our land;
    [13] The fig tree putteth forth her green figs, and the vines with the tender grape give a good smell. Arise, my love, my fair one, and come away.
    [14] O my dove, that art in the clefts of the rock, in the secret places of the stairs, let me see thy countenance, let me hear thy voice; for sweet is thy voice, and thy countenance is comely.
    [15] Take us the foxes, the little foxes, that spoil the vines: for our vines have tender grapes.
    [16] My beloved is mine, and I am his: he feedeth among the lilies.
    [17] Until the day break, and the shadows flee away, turn, my beloved, and be thou like a roe or a young hart upon the mountains of Bether.


    Cant.3
    [1] By night on my bed I sought him whom my soul loveth: I sought him, but I found him not.
    [2] I will rise now, and go about the city in the streets, and in the broad ways I will seek him whom my soul loveth: I sought him, but I found him not.
    [3] The watchmen that go about the city found me: to whom I said, Saw ye him whom my soul loveth?
    [4] It was but a little that I passed from them, but I found him whom my soul loveth: I held him, and would not let him go, until I had brought him into my mother's house, and into the chamber of her that conceived me.
    [5] I charge you, O ye daughters of Jerusalem, by the roes, and by the hinds of the field, that ye stir not up, nor awake my love, till he please.
    [6] Who is this that cometh out of the wilderness like pillars of smoke, perfumed with myrrh and frankincense, with all powders of the merchant?
    [7] Behold his bed, which is Solomon's; threescore valiant men are about it, of the valiant of Israel.
    [8] They all hold swords, being expert in war: every man hath his sword upon his thigh because of fear in the night.
    [9] King Solomon made himself a chariot of the wood of Lebanon.
    [10] He made the pillars thereof of silver, the bottom thereof of gold, the covering of it of purple, the midst thereof being paved with love, for the daughters of Jerusalem.
    [11] Go forth, O ye daughters of Zion, and behold king Solomon with the crown wherewith his mother crowned him in the day of his espousals, and in the day of the gladness of his heart.


    Cant.4
    [1] Behold, thou art fair, my love; behold, thou art fair; thou hast doves' eyes within thy locks: thy hair is as a flock of goats, that appear from mount Gilead.
    [2] Thy teeth are like a flock of sheep that are even shorn, which came up from the washing; whereof every one bear twins, and none is barren among them.
    [3] Thy lips are like a thread of scarlet, and thy speech is comely: thy temples are like a piece of a pomegranate within thy locks.
    [4] Thy neck is like the tower of David builded for an armoury, whereon there hang a thousand bucklers, all shields of mighty men.
    [5] Thy two breasts are like two young roes that are twins, which feed among the lilies.
    [6] Until the day break, and the shadows flee away, I will get me to the mountain of myrrh, and to the hill of frankincense.
    [7] Thou art all fair, my love; there is no spot in thee.
    [8] Come with me from Lebanon, my spouse, with me from Lebanon: look from the top of Amana, from the top of Shenir and Hermon, from the lions' dens, from the mountains of the leopards.
    [9] Thou hast ravished my heart, my sister, my spouse; thou hast ravished my heart with one of thine eyes, with one chain of thy neck.
    [10] How fair is thy love, my sister, my spouse! how much better is thy love than wine! and the smell of thine ointments than all spices!
    [11] Thy lips, O my spouse, drop as the honeycomb: honey and milk are under thy tongue; and the smell of thy garments is like the smell of Lebanon.
    [12] A garden inclosed is my sister, my spouse; a spring shut up, a fountain sealed.
    [13] Thy plants are an orchard of pomegranates, with pleasant fruits; camphire, with spikenard,
    [14] Spikenard and saffron; calamus and cinnamon, with all trees of frankincense; myrrh and aloes, with all the chief spices:
    [15] A fountain of gardens, a well of living waters, and streams from Lebanon.
    [16] Awake, O north wind; and come, thou south; blow upon my garden, that the spices thereof may flow out. Let my beloved come into his garden, and eat his pleasant fruits.


    Cant.5
    [1] I am come into my garden, my sister, my spouse: I have gathered my myrrh with my spice; I have eaten my honeycomb with my honey; I have drunk my wine with my milk: eat, O friends; drink, yea, drink abundantly, O beloved.
    [2] I sleep, but my heart waketh: it is the voice of my beloved that knocketh, saying, Open to me, my sister, my love, my dove, my undefiled: for my head is filled with dew, and my locks with the drops of the night.
    [3] I have put off my coat; how shall I put it on? I have washed my feet; how shall I defile them?
    [4] My beloved put in his hand by the hole of the door, and my bowels were moved for him.
    [5] I rose up to open to my beloved; and my hands dropped with myrrh, and my fingers with sweet smelling myrrh, upon the handles of the lock.
    [6] I opened to my beloved; but my beloved had withdrawn himself, and was gone: my soul failed when he spake: I sought him, but I could not find him; I called him, but he gave me no answer.
    [7] The watchmen that went about the city found me, they smote me, they wounded me; the keepers of the walls took away my veil from me.
    [8] I charge you, O daughters of Jerusalem, if ye find my beloved, that ye tell him, that I am sick of love.
    [9] What is thy beloved more than another beloved, O thou fairest among women? what is thy beloved more than another beloved, that thou dost so charge us?
    [10] My beloved is white and ruddy, the chiefest among ten thousand.
    [11] His head is as the most fine gold, his locks are bushy, and black as a raven.
    [12] His eyes are as the eyes of doves by the rivers of waters, washed with milk, and fitly set.
    [13] His cheeks are as a bed of spices, as sweet flowers: his lips like lilies, dropping sweet smelling myrrh.
    [14] His hands are as gold rings set with the beryl: his belly is as bright ivory overlaid with sapphires.
    [15] His legs are as pillars of marble, set upon sockets of fine gold: his countenance is as Lebanon, excellent as the cedars.
    [16] His mouth is most sweet: yea, he is altogether lovely. This is my beloved, and this is my friend, O daughters of Jerusalem.


    Cant.6
    [1] Whither is thy beloved gone, O thou fairest among women? whither is thy beloved turned aside? that we may seek him with thee.
    [2] My beloved is gone down into his garden, to the beds of spices, to feed in the gardens, and to gather lilies.
    [3] I am my beloved's, and my beloved is mine: he feedeth among the lilies.
    [4] Thou art beautiful, O my love, as Tirzah, comely as Jerusalem, terrible as an army with banners.
    [5] Turn away thine eyes from me, for they have overcome me: thy hair is as a flock of goats that appear from Gilead.
    [6] Thy teeth are as a flock of sheep which go up from the washing, whereof every one beareth twins, and there is not one barren among them.
    [7] As a piece of a pomegranate are thy temples within thy locks.
    [8] There are threescore queens, and fourscore concubines, and virgins without number.
    [9] My dove, my undefiled is but one; she is the only one of her mother, she is the choice one of her that bare her. The daughters saw her, and blessed her; yea, the queens and the concubines, and they praised her.
    [10] Who is she that looketh forth as the morning, fair as the moon, clear as the sun, and terrible as an army with banners?
    [11] I went down into the garden of nuts to see the fruits of the valley, and to see whether the vine flourished, and the pomegranates budded.
    [12] Or ever I was aware, my soul made me like the chariots of Amminadib.
    [13] Return, return, O Shulamite; return, return, that we may look upon thee. What will ye see in the Shulamite? As it were the company of two armies.


    Cant.7
    [1] How beautiful are thy feet with shoes, O prince's daughter! the joints of thy thighs are like jewels, the work of the hands of a cunning workman.
    [2] Thy navel is like a round goblet, which wanteth not liquor: thy belly is like an heap of wheat set about with lilies.
    [3] Thy two breasts are like two young roes that are twins.
    [4] Thy neck is as a tower of ivory; thine eyes like the fishpools in Heshbon, by the gate of Bath-rabbim: thy nose is as the tower of Lebanon which looketh toward Damascus.
    [5] Thine head upon thee is like Carmel, and the hair of thine head like purple; the king is held in the galleries.
    [6] How fair and how pleasant art thou, O love, for delights!
    [7] This thy stature is like to a palm tree, and thy breasts to clusters of grapes.
    [8] I said, I will go up to the palm tree, I will take hold of the boughs thereof: now also thy breasts shall be as clusters of the vine, and the smell of thy nose like apples;
    [9] And the roof of thy mouth like the best wine for my beloved, that goeth down sweetly, causing the lips of those that are asleep to speak.
    [10] I am my beloved's, and his desire is toward me.
    [11] Come, my beloved, let us go forth into the field; let us lodge in the villages.
    [12] Let us get up early to the vineyards; let us see if the vine flourish, whether the tender grape appear, and the pomegranates bud forth: there will I give thee my loves.
    [13] The mandrakes give a smell, and at our gates are all manner of pleasant fruits, new and old, which I have laid up for thee, O my beloved.


    Cant.8
    [1] O that thou wert as my brother, that sucked the breasts of my mother! when I should find thee without, I would kiss thee; yea, I should not be despised.
    [2] I would lead thee, and bring thee into my mother's house, who would instruct me: I would cause thee to drink of spiced wine of the juice of my pomegranate.
    [3] His left hand should be under my head, and his right hand should embrace me.
    [4] I charge you, O daughters of Jerusalem, that ye stir not up, nor awake my love, until he please.
    [5] Who is this that cometh up from the wilderness, leaning upon her beloved? I raised thee up under the apple tree: there thy mother brought thee forth: there she brought thee forth that bare thee.
    [6] Set me as a seal upon thine heart, as a seal upon thine arm: for love is strong as death; jealousy is cruel as the grave: the coals thereof are coals of fire, which hath a most vehement flame.
    [7] Many waters cannot quench love, neither can the floods drown it: if a man would give all the substance of his house for love, it would utterly be contemned.
    [8] We have a little sister, and she hath no breasts: what shall we do for our sister in the day when she shall be spoken for?
    [9] If she be a wall, we will build upon her a palace of silver: and if she be a door, we will inclose her with boards of cedar.
    [10] I am a wall, and my breasts like towers: then was I in his eyes as one that found favour.
    [11] Solomon had a vineyard at Baal-hamon; he let out the vineyard unto keepers; every one for the fruit thereof was to bring a thousand pieces of silver.
    [12] My vineyard, which is mine, is before me: thou, O Solomon, must have a thousand, and those that keep the fruit thereof two hundred.
    [13] Thou that dwellest in the gardens, the companions hearken to thy voice: cause me to hear it.
    [14] Make haste, my beloved, and be thou like to a roe or to a young hart upon the mountains of spices.


    `But I don't want to go among mad people,' Alice remarked.
     `Oh, you can't help that,' said the Cat: `we're all mad here. I'm mad.  You're mad.'
     `How do you know I'm mad?' said Alice.
     `You must be,' said the Cat, `or you wouldn't have come here.'
  • Did anyone read the Bible?
     Reply #20 - February 20, 2014, 03:29 AM

    I can relate to the futility expressed in Ecclesiastes:

    Really? I always found nihilism to be one of the least appealing components of theism.

    Too fucking busy, and vice versa.
  • Did anyone read the Bible?
     Reply #21 - February 20, 2014, 03:36 AM

    I'm not a nihilist but I find it the best book in the Bible simply due to its lack of atrocities.
  • Did anyone read the Bible?
     Reply #22 - February 20, 2014, 03:39 AM

     Cheesy

    `But I don't want to go among mad people,' Alice remarked.
     `Oh, you can't help that,' said the Cat: `we're all mad here. I'm mad.  You're mad.'
     `How do you know I'm mad?' said Alice.
     `You must be,' said the Cat, `or you wouldn't have come here.'
  • Did anyone read the Bible?
     Reply #23 - February 20, 2014, 03:59 AM

    I was bored... I thought about reading the Bible. I got even more bored and barely made it through Genesis, too much reading involved. No wonder there are always preachers making money by reading this crap, no one actually wants to spend their time reading this bullshit (unless they read it for the money). If the Bible (and the Qur'an) are the divinely inspired words of God, then why are they so repetitive and boring?

    If there's anyone in this forum who has read the Bible, please tell me what you thought of it.


    I think the who begets who parts in Genesis are the best way to cure insomnia.
    I find much of it interesting.
    Jezebel
    The Garden of Eden
    Midianites
    I could go on. But really the best are the theories on the bible that you come across in other literature.
    I like the book The Blood Of Christ. I like science fiction takes on Genesis.

    Don't let Hitler have the street.
  • Did anyone read the Bible?
     Reply #24 - February 20, 2014, 04:01 AM

    I find it boring as hell.

    `But I don't want to go among mad people,' Alice remarked.
     `Oh, you can't help that,' said the Cat: `we're all mad here. I'm mad.  You're mad.'
     `How do you know I'm mad?' said Alice.
     `You must be,' said the Cat, `or you wouldn't have come here.'
  • Did anyone read the Bible?
     Reply #25 - February 20, 2014, 04:29 AM

    The Bible is boring, I can only get through it the first time around because of funny pictures on the side (The Brick Testament).
  • Did anyone read the Bible?
     Reply #26 - February 20, 2014, 10:17 AM

    I think a counterargument is called for.

    Firstly, much of the Old Testament is utterly brilliant literature - whether in its poetics, its command of historical-ideological narrative, its moral and psychological complexity, its "performance" as a literary text and its fertility as the parent text to secondary creative literary and artistic activity ( on a par with, if not superior to, Greek Mythology in this respect ).

    Secondly, yes, it can be a hard slog at first - no one reads Leviticus or Numbers for the fun - but it's like Shakespeare or Chaucer in that the more that you read, the easier it gets, the more that you see and the greater the respect for the quality of the work.

    Thirdly, the watcher-daughters of man shenanigans are in Genesis chap 4 - not exactly that far in; they're satirising Babylonian myths and setting up the justification for the cleansing flood episode. But you need to go to works like the Book of Jubilees or Enoch to get the full flavour of their development in later times.
  • Did anyone read the Bible?
     Reply #27 - February 20, 2014, 11:43 AM

    It is an interesting book depending on the approach one takes in reading. As a guide for morality it is an utter failure. However if one looks at the bible as history, if not factual history, it does give an interesting perceptive especially from a people which were at the whims of it's neighbor more often than not. As Josephus pointed out the memo-narrative part national identity part religious identity is an interesting approach. Much like some of the more national mythical figures which are now part folklore; Robin Hood, Arthur, Davy Crockett. Hercules, Caesar, etc . The bible has folk heroes which have a greater than life representation as paragons one should follow, respect and provided a foundation story behind the "great" nation each represents. However like all folk heroes the bible is romanticized leading to the enshrining of certain values and lessons over others. The spiritual views often overshadow the practical views, something which seems lost on many believers. Reading the bible as a non-believer demystifies many elements readers may otherwise overlook. The continuous hand holding the Israelite required who seem to be unable to do anything productive without god for example. This created the parent/child relationship seen in religion, the wayward child and righteous father. If you demystify this theme god becomes a very negligent parent especially in Eden verses.
  • Did anyone read the Bible?
     Reply #28 - February 20, 2014, 11:48 AM

    Really? I always found nihilism to be one of the least appealing components of theism.


    Nihilism a component of theism? Alright-y then.
    Appealing? Heck no. I said I can *relate* to the sense of futility ("No one remembers the former generations, and even those yet to come will not be remembered by those who follow them..."). Don't read too much into it.

  • Did anyone read the Bible?
     Reply #29 - February 20, 2014, 12:52 PM

    I like the Song of Solomon, although it seemed jarringly out of place in a text that was sending me to sleep with the inability to summarise and spin a good yarn like so many other writers eg. China Mieville and his New Crobuzon-based books, CS Friedman's Coldfire trilogy, etc. 

    The horrors of the first five books of Moses was disgusting, but aided by Noah's Ark and Rebekah watering the camels being hilarious because of scientific knowledge and those creationist-myth christians who believe the age of the earth is between 6000 to 13000 years.

    I like Proverbs 8 about the essence of Wisdom. although it could be refined further. I quote:



    Does not wisdom call out?
        Does not understanding raise her voice?
    2 At the highest point along the way,
        where the paths meet, she takes her stand;
    3 beside the gate leading into the city,
        at the entrance, she cries aloud:
    4 “To you, O people, I call out;
        I raise my voice to all mankind.
    5 You who are simple, gain prudence;
        you who are foolish, set your hearts on it.[a]
    6 Listen, for I have trustworthy things to say;
        I open my lips to speak what is right.
    7 My mouth speaks what is true,
        for my lips detest wickedness.
    8 All the words of my mouth are just;
        none of them is crooked or perverse.
    9 To the discerning all of them are right;
        they are upright to those who have found knowledge.
    10 Choose my instruction instead of silver,
        knowledge rather than choice gold,
    11 for wisdom is more precious than rubies,
        and nothing you desire can compare with her.

    12 “I, wisdom, dwell together with prudence;
        I possess knowledge and discretion.
    13 To fear the Lord is to hate evil;
        I hate pride and arrogance,
        evil behavior and perverse speech.
    14 Counsel and sound judgment are mine;
        I have insight, I have power.
    15 By me kings reign
        and rulers issue decrees that are just;
    16 by me princes govern,
        and nobles—all who rule on earth.
    17 I love those who love me,
        and those who seek me find me.
    18 With me are riches and honor,
        enduring wealth and prosperity.
    19 My fruit is better than fine gold;
        what I yield surpasses choice silver.
    20 I walk in the way of righteousness,
        along the paths of justice,
    21 bestowing a rich inheritance on those who love me
        and making their treasuries full.

    22 “The Lord brought me forth as the first of his works,
        before his deeds of old;
    23 I was formed long ages ago,
        at the very beginning, when the world came to be.
    24 When there were no watery depths, I was given birth,
        when there were no springs overflowing with water;
    25 before the mountains were settled in place,
        before the hills, I was given birth,
    26 before he made the world or its fields
        or any of the dust of the earth.
    27 I was there when he set the heavens in place,
        when he marked out the horizon on the face of the deep,
    28 when he established the clouds above
        and fixed securely the fountains of the deep,
    29 when he gave the sea its boundary
        so the waters would not overstep his command,
    and when he marked out the foundations of the earth.
    30     Then I was constantly[e] at his side.
    I was filled with delight day after day,
        rejoicing always in his presence,
    31 rejoicing in his whole world
        and delighting in mankind.

    32 “Now then, my children, listen to me;
        blessed are those who keep my ways.
    33 Listen to my instruction and be wise;
        do not disregard it.
    34 Blessed are those who listen to me,
        watching daily at my doors,
        waiting at my doorway.
    35 For those who find me find life
        and receive favor from the Lord.
    36 But those who fail to find me harm themselves;
        all who hate me love death.”     

    "Beauty is in the eye of the beholder. Hence it is sometimes necessary to give the beholder a black eye of context and proportion."
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