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Theme Changer

 Topic: A little nervous about this.

 (Read 2682 times)
  • 1« Previous thread | Next thread »
  • A little nervous about this.
     OP - January 17, 2014, 06:20 AM

    Hi. I'm a little nervous about posting online from where I'm posting. Though I'm fully aware that my ISP assigns dynamic IPs etc. I sometimes use VPNs to log-in so many forums have thought that I make spam accounts. However, I feel it's necessary given the laws around leaving Islam.

    My story mirrors that of a lot of ex-Musilms. The doubts started when I was around 8, and I spent about a decade researching studying everything Islam related for a decade before finally deciding on a label for myself.

    I consider myself a free thinker not willing to align myself to any particular school of thought. But yes, in the end, I'm probably around a 6-7 on Richard Dawkins' scale.

    Weird. I'm already shaky posting this. I haven't lurked here very long. I just discovered the forum yesterday and decided to sign up. Don't know much about it yet, but I'll be reading and learning as I go along.

    Thanks for this forum. I've been looking for something like this for a while. There are other atheist/agnostic forums, but this is the first I've seen exclusive for ex-muslims.

    So yah. That's about it for now Tongue Nervousness ensues ...
  • A little nervous about this.
     Reply #1 - January 17, 2014, 06:30 AM

    Security is something that is taken seriously, though you seem to know a bit about covering your tracks.

    Welcome to the forum. parrot

    `But I don't want to go among mad people,' Alice remarked.
     `Oh, you can't help that,' said the Cat: `we're all mad here. I'm mad.  You're mad.'
     `How do you know I'm mad?' said Alice.
     `You must be,' said the Cat, `or you wouldn't have come here.'
  • A little nervous about this.
     Reply #2 - January 17, 2014, 06:32 AM

    Welcome!  You'll find you fit right in here.

    Here's your welcome parrot.  parrot

    Atheism is a non-prophet organization.

    The sleeper has awakened -  Dune

    Give a man a fish, and you'll feed him for a day Give him a religion, and he'll starve to death while praying for a fish!
  • A little nervous about this.
     Reply #3 - January 17, 2014, 09:10 AM

    Have a parrot freethinker  parrot . If you could maybe share a bit about your life such as where you are from and what made you doubt .
  • A little nervous about this.
     Reply #4 - January 17, 2014, 10:44 AM

    Thanks for the welcome folks. But I'm not exclusively to a country because I've been moving around between the east and west for the past 17 years. So I try to stay away from identifying with any country in particular. Trust me, it's actually very freeing when you don't feel bound to uphold nationalism.

    Basically, I'm a traveller moving around from place to place as I fancy .. Of course, that by itself has been a major contributing factor towards my enlightenment.

    Well, it was just question after question that was unanswerable. What ultimately broke the camel's back in the end was when I finally dug in my heels and questioned suffering instead of believing it away like people of faith do. The whole "Allah's test" argument stopped making sense. Then there was the realization that no matter what we do in life the bad is attributed to the self, and the good is attributed to Allah. Like ... yeah .. really. At first it actually did make sense because those were what I call question killing arguments. You can go no farther when you say "because god" ...

    I found Richard Dawkins and the rest is history. Dawkins ... Hitchens .. Sam Haaris ... Neil DeGrasse Tyson .. Carl Sagan .. That led to real science (beyond what's taught in high school) .. which led to questioning all forms of pseudo science .. which led to questioning all forms of supernatural .. and here I am Tongue

  • A little nervous about this.
     Reply #5 - January 17, 2014, 11:08 AM

    I'm not actually an ex-muslim but your thoughts could of come from my own head.

    Quote
    questioned suffering instead of believing it away like people of faith do. The whole "Allah's test" argument stopped making sense. Then there was the realization that no matter what we do in life the bad is attributed to the self, and the good is attributed to Allah. Like ... yeah .. really. At first it actually did make sense because those were what I call question killing arguments. You can go no farther when you say "because god" ...


    ^ Yup.

    I've very glad I studied the holy books and theology of so many religions. They reinforced the fact that it was all perverse fairy-tales dreamed up by liars and madmen.

    In my experiance the best way to combat religion is to learn about it.

    `But I don't want to go among mad people,' Alice remarked.
     `Oh, you can't help that,' said the Cat: `we're all mad here. I'm mad.  You're mad.'
     `How do you know I'm mad?' said Alice.
     `You must be,' said the Cat, `or you wouldn't have come here.'
  • A little nervous about this.
     Reply #6 - January 17, 2014, 11:29 AM

    Quote
    In my experiance the best way to combat religion is to learn about it.


    Knowledge really kills it doesn't it? It's why Islam in particular restricts its spread ... 

    Especially when with increasing knowledge you start making all these connections about origins and creation of myths .. how they evolve and spread around the world ... And you start looking at the rest of them with sadness .. surprisingly. When I see people too caught up in the "comfort" argument, I actually wish I could just give them a teddy bear to hug which actually give them more physical comfort than their fake whatever they believe in.

    The greatest irony about knowledge is that growing up whenever my questions became too hard for my parents to handle, they would encourage me to go speak to an imam instead of researching myself. But I refused to do that and instead of relying on given answers, I just picked up the quran and a hundred other books in search of the answers myself.

    The more I learnt, the less religious I became. And it seems to be a very common statement of atheists.
  • A little nervous about this.
     Reply #7 - January 17, 2014, 02:48 PM

    Welcome to the forum PKFreeThinker. Have a rabbit!  bunny

    I really like your story and can see some parallels with my own. Anyway, I hope you stay safe and enjoy the forums!  Afro

    how fuck works without shit??


    Let's Play Chess!

    harakaat, friend, RIP
  • A little nervous about this.
     Reply #8 - January 17, 2014, 03:16 PM

    hello, welcome!

    Quote from: ZooBear 

    • Surah Al-Fil: In an epic game of Angry Birds, Allah uses birds (that drop pebbles) to destroy an army riding elephants whose intentions were to destroy the Kaaba. No one has beaten the high score.

  • A little nervous about this.
     Reply #9 - January 17, 2014, 05:54 PM

     parrot

    Quote
    , I actually wish I could just give them a teddy bear to hug which actually give them more physical comfort than their fake whatever they believe in.


    This might actually be very important and a quite simple way to cure religion!

    When you are a Bear of Very Little Brain, and you Think of Things, you find sometimes that a Thing which seemed very Thingish inside you is quite different when it gets out into the open and has other people looking at it.


    A.A. Milne,

    "We cannot slaughter each other out of the human impasse"
  • A little nervous about this.
     Reply #10 - January 17, 2014, 05:57 PM

    Quote
    A year or two back, one of my daughters was obsessed with playing 'grandma'. Both of her grandmothers had died before she was born, and she was acutely aware of the deficit in her life. So day after day, for months on end, she'd announce me that I was grandma and ask me to tie a scarf on my head; then she'd provide the script: 'Now you say, 'hello darling, would you like some cake?'', and I'd dutifully parrot the words, holding a plate, while she worked out her next move. That play was incredibly important as she processed a grief she couldn't otherwise articulate, and I thought of it recently as I re-acquainted myself with Dibs.

    I first read the story of Dibs while I was in high school, and he touched my heart. While he never quite left me, it's only this year that I found my own copy of the book. It was wonderful to re-read it now I'm an adult with her own young children.

    Dibs was an almost wholly uncommunicative little boy. He did not play with other children in his pre-school; he would not communicate with his teachers or his parents except by way of tantrums. He refused to do anything for himself; he sat passively under tables or on the outskirts of the group, ignoring everything that went on; he did not speak. Some, including his parents, feared he was intellectually impaired; others suspected he was intellectual capable, but stuck in an emotional quagmire.

    So Dibs was sent to play therapy. The book is the non-fiction account of his time there, drawn directly from transcripts and the observations of his play therapist, Virginia Axline. Dibs visited the play room weekly, and at each visit teased out a little more of emotions which suffocated him. As he became relaxed in the room, his imaginary world unfolded: he buried a father doll, locked up the mother and sister doll, and developed a great imaginary city in which he acted out his experiences, worked out how he felt about them, and developed his sense of self.

    While Dibs worked, the therapist sat with him quietly reflecting back to Dibs his comments in a non-committal way. This makes the book a little stilted at times: 'I did it!' said Dibs. 'You did it,' remarked the therapist. It looks rather idiotic when transcribed; and yet it is clearly liberating and affirming for the young boy to have his comments and actions noticed but not judged....


    http://lostinastory.blogspot.co.uk/2010/12/dibs-in-search-of-self.html

    When you are a Bear of Very Little Brain, and you Think of Things, you find sometimes that a Thing which seemed very Thingish inside you is quite different when it gets out into the open and has other people looking at it.


    A.A. Milne,

    "We cannot slaughter each other out of the human impasse"
  • A little nervous about this.
     Reply #11 - January 18, 2014, 01:26 AM

     parrot

    Welcome. I too, have urges to hand out comforting objects, and snacks, as well.

    Don't let Hitler have the street.
  • A little nervous about this.
     Reply #12 - January 23, 2014, 06:21 PM

    I find it interesting as you mentioned that. When one questions God, we're not encouraged to do our own research, we're encouraged to talk to a very specific person, who is bent on giving a very specific answer. I don't even understand how people can't even find this method suspicious in itself and swear by it.

    ***~Church is where bad people go to hide~***
  • A little nervous about this.
     Reply #13 - January 28, 2014, 08:53 AM

    Hi PKFreeThinker,

    Welcome - I really like you way of thinking - it is - uhm - free Tongue

    Quote
    Trust me, it's actually very freeing when you don't feel bound to uphold nationalism.


    This. I love the system we have in Denmark and I love the trust we generally have towards each other compared to other nations - but it is not because of our nationality in itself. Is has historical and socio-economic explanations (but it works - and "new" Danes (kids of Middle Eastern Immigrants) often mention it as the primary thing they positively connect to their "Danishness" together with the positive things they select from their parents' cultures)

    Danish Never-Moose adopted by the kind people on the CEMB-forum
    Ex-Muslim chat (Unaffliated with CEMB). Safari users: Use "#ex-muslims" as the channel name. CEMB chat thread.
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