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Theme Changer

 Topic: On this Day

 (Read 10335 times)
  • 1« Previous thread | Next thread »
  • On this Day
     OP - October 11, 2013, 07:49 AM

    On Oct. 11, 1968, Apollo 7, the first manned Apollo mission, was launched with astronauts Wally Schirra, Donn Fulton Eisele and R. Walter Cunningham aboard.


    `But I don't want to go among mad people,' Alice remarked.
     `Oh, you can't help that,' said the Cat: `we're all mad here. I'm mad.  You're mad.'
     `How do you know I'm mad?' said Alice.
     `You must be,' said the Cat, `or you wouldn't have come here.'
  • On this Day
     Reply #1 - December 09, 2013, 10:18 AM

    Grace Hopper was born on 9th December, 1906. An American computer scientist and United States Navy Rear Admiral. A pioneer in the field, she was one of the first programmers of the Harvard Mark I computer, and developed the first compiler for a computer programming language. She conceptualized the idea of machine-independent programming languages, which led to the development of COBOL, one of the first modern programming languages. She is credited with popularizing the term "debugging" for fixing computer glitches (inspired by an actual moth removed from the computer). Owing to the breadth of her accomplishments and her naval rank, she is sometimes referred to as "Amazing Grace". U.S. Navy destroyer USS Hopper (DDG-70) is named for her, as was the Cray XE6 "Hopper" supercomputer at NERSC.

    Grace Hopper, mother of Cobol.






    `But I don't want to go among mad people,' Alice remarked.
     `Oh, you can't help that,' said the Cat: `we're all mad here. I'm mad.  You're mad.'
     `How do you know I'm mad?' said Alice.
     `You must be,' said the Cat, `or you wouldn't have come here.'
  • On this Day
     Reply #2 - December 27, 2013, 07:05 AM

    On 27th December 1571, in Weil der Stadt, Germany was born Johannes Kepler. This great mathematician, astronomer and astrologer was a key figure in the 17th century scientific revolution, despite being German.



     001_wub

    `But I don't want to go among mad people,' Alice remarked.
     `Oh, you can't help that,' said the Cat: `we're all mad here. I'm mad.  You're mad.'
     `How do you know I'm mad?' said Alice.
     `You must be,' said the Cat, `or you wouldn't have come here.'
  • On this Day
     Reply #3 - December 27, 2013, 12:23 PM

    Are you taking inspiration from google QSE?

    "Make anyone believe their own knowledge and logic is insufficient and you'll have a puppet susceptible to manipulation."
  • On this Day
     Reply #4 - December 27, 2013, 07:36 PM

    More taking inspiration by adding people/events that I like.

    `But I don't want to go among mad people,' Alice remarked.
     `Oh, you can't help that,' said the Cat: `we're all mad here. I'm mad.  You're mad.'
     `How do you know I'm mad?' said Alice.
     `You must be,' said the Cat, `or you wouldn't have come here.'
  • On this Day
     Reply #5 - December 27, 2013, 10:31 PM

    Ok I shall be checking to see if tomorrows post is linked to Mr googles layout Tongue

    "Make anyone believe their own knowledge and logic is insufficient and you'll have a puppet susceptible to manipulation."
  • On this Day
     Reply #6 - December 27, 2013, 10:37 PM

    On 27th December 1571, in Weil der Stadt, Germany was born Johannes Kepler. This great mathematician, astronomer and astrologer was a key figure in the 17th century scientific revolution, despite being German.



     Huh?
  • On this Day
     Reply #7 - December 28, 2013, 04:21 AM

    Bloody Germans. Wink

    `But I don't want to go among mad people,' Alice remarked.
     `Oh, you can't help that,' said the Cat: `we're all mad here. I'm mad.  You're mad.'
     `How do you know I'm mad?' said Alice.
     `You must be,' said the Cat, `or you wouldn't have come here.'
  • On this Day
     Reply #8 - December 28, 2013, 04:30 AM

    Ok I shall be checking to see if tomorrows post is linked to Mr googles layout Tongue


    It's more that google reminds me. For instance, I'm a huge fan of Shakespeare, but have no clue the actual date of the first performances of my fav plays. I'm also fascinated by the human genome project but clueless about the specific date of the discovery of the tree of life locked inside of us. The Large Hadron Collider is something I hold in esteem in a similar way to how my grandparents viewed the Vatican but am unsure of the anniversary of some of the events that most captivated me, such as recreating the conditions of the big bang.

    I imagine I'll be one of those men who holds meeting his love for the first time dear in his heart but never remembers when the anniversary actually is.

    `But I don't want to go among mad people,' Alice remarked.
     `Oh, you can't help that,' said the Cat: `we're all mad here. I'm mad.  You're mad.'
     `How do you know I'm mad?' said Alice.
     `You must be,' said the Cat, `or you wouldn't have come here.'
  • On this Day
     Reply #9 - January 27, 2014, 10:48 PM

    Eugène Viollet-le-Duc was born January 27, 1814 in Paris. One of my favourite gothic architects. Man could of built Gotham City. Next time you see Batman perched on a gargoyle or gliding overhead, think of him.





















     001_wub

    `But I don't want to go among mad people,' Alice remarked.
     `Oh, you can't help that,' said the Cat: `we're all mad here. I'm mad.  You're mad.'
     `How do you know I'm mad?' said Alice.
     `You must be,' said the Cat, `or you wouldn't have come here.'
  • On this Day
     Reply #10 - February 25, 2014, 09:44 AM

    On 25th February 1870, Hiram R. Revels, Republican of Mississippi, became the first black member of the United States Senate as he was sworn in to serve out the unexpired term of Jefferson Davis.








    `But I don't want to go among mad people,' Alice remarked.
     `Oh, you can't help that,' said the Cat: `we're all mad here. I'm mad.  You're mad.'
     `How do you know I'm mad?' said Alice.
     `You must be,' said the Cat, `or you wouldn't have come here.'
  • On this Day
     Reply #11 - March 04, 2014, 12:02 PM

    And another US related one (need to fix that).

    On March 4, 1933, the start of President Roosevelt's first administration brought with it the first woman to serve in the cabinet, Labour Secretary Frances Perkins.



    Frances Perkins, the daughter of Susan Bean Perkins and Frederick W. Perkins, the owner of a stationer's business, was born in Boston on 10th April, 1882. After graduating from Mount Holyoke College, she worked as a social worker in Worcester, Massachusetts, and a teacher in Chicago.



    Frances Perkins, the daughter of Susan Bean Perkins and Frederick W. Perkins, the owner of a stationer's business, was born in Boston on 10th April, 1882. After graduating from Mount Holyoke College, she worked as a social worker in Worcester, Massachusetts, and a teacher in Chicago.

    Perkins was deeply influenced by the writings of investigative journalists such as Lincoln Steffens, Ray Stannard Baker, Jacob A. Riis and Upton Sinclair. While in Chicago she became involved in Hull House, a settlement house founded by Jane Addams. Later she moved to Philadelphia, where she worked with immigrant girls. Perkins later explained that during this period attitudes changed towards poverty: "Proposals began to be made for laws to overcome social disadvantages. Societies and voluntary agencies, aiming to prevent abuses and promote remedies, sprang up. There was a sincere effort on the part of the American people to find the way of social justice. Shorter hours and better wages, removal of slums, new tenement house laws for sanitation, fire safety, and decency; reforms to prevent child labour, prevention of the use of hazardous chemicals in industry began to be mentioned in political speeches and legislation in some states. Foremost was the idea that poverty is preventable, that poverty is destructive, wasteful, demoralizing, and that poverty in the midst of potential plenty is morally unacceptable in a Christian and democratic society."


    `But I don't want to go among mad people,' Alice remarked.
     `Oh, you can't help that,' said the Cat: `we're all mad here. I'm mad.  You're mad.'
     `How do you know I'm mad?' said Alice.
     `You must be,' said the Cat, `or you wouldn't have come here.'
  • On this Day
     Reply #12 - March 06, 2014, 01:01 PM

    On this day, 6th March 1806 Elizabeth Barrett Browning, one of the most prominent poets of the Victorian era, was born.

    Born in County Durham, the eldest of 12 children, Browning was educated at home. She wrote poetry from around the age of six and this was compiled by her mother, comprising what is now one of the largest collections of juvenilia extant of any English writer. At 15 Browning became ill, suffering from intense head and spinal pain for the rest of her life, rendering her frail. She took laudanum for the pain which may have led to a lifelong addiction, contributing to her weak health.

    In the 1830s Barrett's cousin John Kenyon introduced her to prominent literary figures of the day such as William Wordsworth, Mary Russell Mitford, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Alfred Lord Tennyson and Thomas Carlyle. Browning's first adult collection The Seraphim and Other Poems was published in 1838. During this time she contracted a disease, possibly tuberculosis, which weakened her further. Living at Wimpole Street, in London, Browning wrote prolifically between 1841 and 1844, producing poetry, translation and prose. She campaigned for the abolition of slavery and her work helped influence reform in child labour legislation. Her prolific output made her a rival to Tennyson as a candidate for poet laureate on the death of Wordsworth.

    Browning's volume Poems (1844) brought her great success. During this time she met and corresponded with the writer Robert Browning, who admired her work. The courtship and marriage between the two was carried out in secret, fearing her father's disapproval. Following the wedding she was disinherited by her father and rejected by her brothers. The couple moved to Italy in 1846, where she would live for the rest of her life. They had one son, Robert Barrett Browning, whom they called Pen. Towards the end of her life, her lung function worsened. She moved from Florence, Siena and finally Rome, where she died in 1861.

    Brought up in a strongly religious household, much of Browning's work carries a Christian theme. Her work had a major influence on prominent writers of the day including Edgar Allan Poe and Emily Dickinson. She is remembered for such poems as "How Do I Love Thee?" (Sonnet 43, 1845) and Aurora Leigh (1856).



    Quote
    A Child Asleep

    How he sleepeth! having drunken
     Weary childhood's mandragore,
     From his pretty eyes have sunken
     Pleasures, to make room for more---
    Sleeping near the withered nosegay, which he pulled the day before.

     Nosegays! leave them for the waking:
     Throw them earthward where they grew.
     Dim are such, beside the breaking
     Amaranths he looks unto---
    Folded eyes see brighter colours than the open ever do.

     Heaven-flowers, rayed by shadows golden
     From the paths they sprang beneath,
     Now perhaps divinely holden,
     Swing against him in a wreath---
    We may think so from the quickening of his bloom and of his breath.

     Vision unto vision calleth,
     While the young child dreameth on.
     Fair, O dreamer, thee befalleth
     With the glory thou hast won!
    Darker wert thou in the garden, yestermorn, by summer sun.

     We should see the spirits ringing
     Round thee,---were the clouds away.
     'Tis the child-heart draws them, singing
     In the silent-seeming clay---
    Singing!---Stars that seem the mutest, go in music all the way.

     As the moths around a taper,
     As the bees around a rose,
     As the gnats around a vapour,---
     So the Spirits group and close
    Round about a holy childhood, as if drinking its repose.

     Shapes of brightness overlean thee,---
     Flash their diadems of youth
     On the ringlets which half screen thee,---
     While thou smilest, . . . not in sooth
    Thy smile . . . but the overfair one, dropt from some aethereal mouth.

     Haply it is angels' duty,
     During slumber, shade by shade:
     To fine down this childish beauty
     To the thing it must be made,
    Ere the world shall bring it praises, or the tomb shall see it fade.

     Softly, softly! make no noises!
     Now he lieth dead and dumb---
     Now he hears the angels' voices
     Folding silence in the room---
    Now he muses deep the meaning of the Heaven-words as they come.

     Speak not! he is consecrated---
     Breathe no breath across his eyes.
     Lifted up and separated,
     On the hand of God he lies,
    In a sweetness beyond touching---held in cloistral sanctities.

     Could ye bless him---father---mother ?
     Bless the dimple in his cheek?
     Dare ye look at one another,
     And the benediction speak?
    Would ye not break out in weeping, and confess yourselves too weak?

     He is harmless---ye are sinful,---
     Ye are troubled---he, at ease:
     From his slumber, virtue winful
     Floweth outward with increase---
    Dare not bless him! but be blessed by his peace---and go in peace.





    Quote
    A Dead Rose

    O Rose! who dares to name thee?
    No longer roseate now, nor soft, nor sweet;
    But pale, and hard, and dry, as stubble-wheat,---
     Kept seven years in a drawer---thy titles shame thee.

     The breeze that used to blow thee
    Between the hedgerow thorns, and take away
    An odour up the lane to last all day,---
     If breathing now,---unsweetened would forego thee.

     The sun that used to smite thee,
    And mix his glory in thy gorgeous urn,
    Till beam appeared to bloom, and flower to burn,---
     If shining now,---with not a hue would light thee.

     The dew that used to wet thee,
    And, white first, grow incarnadined, because
    It lay upon thee where the crimson was,---
     If dropping now,---would darken where it met thee.

     The fly that lit upon thee,
    To stretch the tendrils of its tiny feet,
    Along thy leaf's pure edges, after heat,---
     If lighting now,---would coldly overrun thee.

     The bee that once did suck thee,
    And build thy perfumed ambers up his hive,
    And swoon in thee for joy, till scarce alive,---
     If passing now,---would blindly overlook thee.

     The heart doth recognise thee,
    Alone, alone! The heart doth smell thee sweet,
    Doth view thee fair, doth judge thee most complete,---
     Though seeing now those changes that disguise thee.

     Yes, and the heart doth owe thee
    More love, dead rose! than to such roses bold
    As Julia wears at dances, smiling cold!---
     Lie still upon this heart---which breaks below thee!





    Quote
    A Thought For A Lonely Death-Bed

    IF God compel thee to this destiny,
    To die alone, with none beside thy bed
    To ruffle round with sobs thy last word said
    And mark with tears the pulses ebb from thee,--
    Pray then alone, ' O Christ, come tenderly !
    By thy forsaken Sonship in the red
    Drear wine-press,--by the wilderness out-spread,--
    And the lone garden where thine agony
    Fell bloody from thy brow,--by all of those
    Permitted desolations, comfort mine !
    No earthly friend being near me, interpose
    No deathly angel 'twixt my face aud thine,
    But stoop Thyself to gather my life's rose,
    And smile away my mortal to Divine ! '





    Quote
    A Woman's Shortcomings

    She has laughed as softly as if she sighed,
    She has counted six, and over,
    Of a purse well filled, and a heart well tried -
    Oh, each a worthy lover!
    They "give her time"; for her soul must slip
    Where the world has set the grooving;
    She will lie to none with her fair red lip:
    But love seeks truer loving.

    She trembles her fan in a sweetness dumb,
    As her thoughts were beyond recalling;
    With a glance for one, and a glance for some,
    From her eyelids rising and falling;
    Speaks common words with a blushful air,
    Hears bold words, unreproving;
    But her silence says - what she never will swear -
    And love seeks better loving.

    Go, lady! lean to the night-guitar,
    And drop a smile to the bringer;
    Then smile as sweetly, when he is far,
    At the voice of an in-door singer.
    Bask tenderly beneath tender eyes;
    Glance lightly, on their removing;
    And join new vows to old perjuries -
    But dare not call it loving!

    Unless you can think, when the song is done,
    No other is soft in the rhythm;
    Unless you can feel, when left by One,
    That all men else go with him;
    Unless you can know, when unpraised by his breath,
    That your beauty itself wants proving;
    Unless you can swear "For life, for death!" -
    Oh, fear to call it loving!

    Unless you can muse in a crowd all day
    On the absent face that fixed you;
    Unless you can love, as the angels may,
    With the breadth of heaven betwixt you;
    Unless you can dream that his faith is fast,
    Through behoving and unbehoving;
    Unless you can die when the dream is past -
    Oh, never call it loving!





    Quote
    Cheerfulness Taught By Reason

    I THINK we are too ready with complaint
    In this fair world of God's. Had we no hope
    Indeed beyond the zenith and the slope
    Of yon gray blank of sky, we might grow faint
    To muse upon eternity's constraint
    Round our aspirant souls; but since the scope
    Must widen early, is it well to droop,
    For a few days consumed in loss and taint ?
    O pusillanimous Heart, be comforted
    And, like a cheerful traveller, take the road
    Singing beside the hedge. What if the bread
    Be bitter in thine inn, and thou unshod
    To meet the flints ? At least it may be said
    ' Because the way is short, I thank thee, God. '





    Quote
    Change Upon Change

    Five months ago the stream did flow,
     The lilies bloomed within the sedge,
    And we were lingering to and fro,
    Where none will track thee in this snow,
     Along the stream, beside the hedge.
    Ah, Sweet, be free to love and go!
     For if I do not hear thy foot,
     The frozen river is as mute,
     The flowers have dried down to the root:
     And why, since these be changed since May,
     Shouldst thou change less than they.

    And slow, slow as the winter snow
     The tears have drifted to mine eyes;
    And my poor cheeks, five months ago
    Set blushing at thy praises so,
     Put paleness on for a disguise.
    Ah, Sweet, be free to praise and go!
     For if my face is turned too pale,
     It was thine oath that first did fail, --
     It was thy love proved false and frail, --
     And why, since these be changed enow,
     Should I change less than thou.





    Quote
    A Man's Requirements

    I

    Love me Sweet, with all thou art,
    Feeling, thinking, seeing;
    Love me in the lightest part,
    Love me in full being.

    II

    Love me with thine open youth
    In its frank surrender;
    With the vowing of thy mouth,
    With its silence tender.

    III

    Love me with thine azure eyes,
    Made for earnest grantings;
    Taking colour from the skies,
    Can Heaven's truth be wanting?

    IV

    Love me with their lids, that fall
    Snow-like at first meeting;
    Love me with thine heart, that all
    Neighbours then see beating.

    V

    Love me with thine hand stretched out
    Freely -- open-minded:
    Love me with thy loitering foot, --
    Hearing one behind it.

    VI

    Love me with thy voice, that turns
    Sudden faint above me;
    Love me with thy blush that burns
    When I murmur 'Love me!'

    VII

    Love me with thy thinking soul,
    Break it to love-sighing;
    Love me with thy thoughts that roll
    On through living -- dying.

    VIII

    Love me in thy gorgeous airs,
    When the world has crowned thee;
    Love me, kneeling at thy prayers,
    With the angels round thee.

    IX

    Love me pure, as muses do,
    Up the woodlands shady:
    Love me gaily, fast and true,
    As a winsome lady.

    X

    Through all hopes that keep us brave,
    Farther off or nigher,
    Love me for the house and grave,
    And for something higher.

    XI

    Thus, if thou wilt prove me, Dear,
    Woman's love no fable,
    I will love thee -- half a year --
    As a man is able.





    Quote
    A Curse For A Nation

    I heard an angel speak last night,
     And he said 'Write!
    Write a Nation's curse for me,
    And send it over the Western Sea.'

    I faltered, taking up the word:
     'Not so, my lord!
    If curses must be, choose another
    To send thy curse against my brother.

    'For I am bound by gratitude,
     By love and blood,
    To brothers of mine across the sea,
    Who stretch out kindly hands to me.'

    'Therefore,' the voice said, 'shalt thou write
     My curse to-night.
    From the summits of love a curse is driven,
    As lightning is from the tops of heaven.'

    'Not so,' I answered. 'Evermore
     My heart is sore
    For my own land's sins: for little feet
    Of children bleeding along the street:

    'For parked-up honors that gainsay
     The right of way:
    For almsgiving through a door that is
    Not open enough for two friends to kiss:

    'For love of freedom which abates
     Beyond the Straits:
    For patriot virtue starved to vice on
    Self-praise, self-interest, and suspicion:

    'For an oligarchic parliament,
     And bribes well-meant.
    What curse to another land assign,
    When heavy-souled for the sins of mine?'

    'Therefore,' the voice said, 'shalt thou write
     My curse to-night.
    Because thou hast strength to see and hate
    A foul thing done within thy gate.'

    'Not so,' I answered once again.
     'To curse, choose men.
    For I, a woman, have only known
    How the heart melts and the tears run down.'

    'Therefore,' the voice said, 'shalt thou write
     My curse to-night.
    Some women weep and curse, I say
    (And no one marvels), night and day.

    'And thou shalt take their part to-night,
     Weep and write.
    A curse from the depths of womanhood
    Is very salt, and bitter, and good.'

    So thus I wrote, and mourned indeed,
     What all may read.
    And thus, as was enjoined on me,
    I send it over the Western Sea.

    The Curse

    Because ye have broken your own chain
     With the strain
    Of brave men climbing a Nation's height,
    Yet thence bear down with brand and thong
     On souls of others, -- for this wrong
     This is the curse. Write.

    Because yourselves are standing straight
     In the state
    Of Freedom's foremost acolyte,
    Yet keep calm footing all the time
     On writhing bond-slaves, -- for this crime
     This is the curse. Write.

    Because ye prosper in God's name,
     With a claim
    To honor in the old world's sight,
    Yet do the fiend's work perfectly
     In strangling martyrs, -- for this lie
     This is the curse. Write.

    Ye shall watch while kings conspire
    Round the people's smouldering fire,
     And, warm for your part,
    Shall never dare -- O shame!
    To utter the thought into flame
     Which burns at your heart.
     This is the curse. Write.

    Ye shall watch while nations strive
    With the bloodhounds, die or survive,
     Drop faint from their jaws,
    Or throttle them backward to death;
    And only under your breath
     Shall favor the cause.
     This is the curse. Write.

    Ye shall watch while strong men draw
    The nets of feudal law
     To strangle the weak;
    And, counting the sin for a sin,
    Your soul shall be sadder within
     Than the word ye shall speak.
     This is the curse. Write.

    When good men are praying erect
    That Christ may avenge His elect
     And deliver the earth,
    The prayer in your ears, said low,
    Shall sound like the tramp of a foe
     That's driving you forth.
     This is the curse. Write.

    When wise men give you their praise,
    They shall praise in the heat of the phrase,
     As if carried too far.
    When ye boast your own charters kept true,
    Ye shall blush; for the thing which ye do
     Derides what ye are.
     This is the curse. Write.

    When fools cast taunts at your gate,
    Your scorn ye shall somewhat abate
     As ye look o'er the wall;
    For your conscience, tradition, and name
    Explode with a deadlier blame
     Than the worst of them all.
     This is the curse. Write.

    Go, wherever ill deeds shall be done,
    Go, plant your flag in the sun
     Beside the ill-doers!
    And recoil from clenching the curse
    Of God's witnessing Universe
     With a curse of yours.
     This is the curse. Write.





     001_wub

    `But I don't want to go among mad people,' Alice remarked.
     `Oh, you can't help that,' said the Cat: `we're all mad here. I'm mad.  You're mad.'
     `How do you know I'm mad?' said Alice.
     `You must be,' said the Cat, `or you wouldn't have come here.'
  • On this Day
     Reply #13 - June 12, 2014, 07:03 PM

    I couldn't really pinpoint an exact day when I decided that I wanted to become a physicist, I believe it was a gradually increasing desire. From reading  about the shear size of the universe (thank you Carl Sagan for that!), to quantum mechanics, physics kept on fascinating me However, the main catalyst of my desire to devote a life of studying this noble subject, came from reading, as a 9 year old boy, about Maxwell's equations. I didn't understand them at the time (I didn't even know calculus!), but I did understand the basic principle, a mathematical link between electricity and magnetism. I read about how Maxwell had elegantly and concisely described light, magnetism, and electricity. My young mind was blown away, mesmerised by how we could describe nature with mathematics. 

    Happy birthday Maxwell, and thank you for inspiring a young boy to pursue a career in Physics. Rest in peace, you great soul.
  • On this Day
     Reply #14 - June 12, 2014, 07:09 PM

    Nice.

    `But I don't want to go among mad people,' Alice remarked.
     `Oh, you can't help that,' said the Cat: `we're all mad here. I'm mad.  You're mad.'
     `How do you know I'm mad?' said Alice.
     `You must be,' said the Cat, `or you wouldn't have come here.'
  • On this Day
     Reply #15 - June 19, 2014, 09:27 PM



    On this day, 19th June 1815 Napoleon was defeated at Waterloo by Duke Wellington and exiled to St. Helena.



    Napoleon Bonaparte was a man of modest beginnings. He was the son of a minor nobleman raised in Corsica. If he had joined the old French Army before the revolution, he would not have been able to command more than a regiment.  However,  in the new French army,  he rose throw the ranks quickly due to his ability as an officer, not by his wealth.







    Napoleon’s last great battle came in the summer of 1815 at Waterloo where Napoleon was defeated by the British and Prussians. This was the last great battle of the Napoleonic wars and made of a legend out of Napoleon and General Wellington.


    `But I don't want to go among mad people,' Alice remarked.
     `Oh, you can't help that,' said the Cat: `we're all mad here. I'm mad.  You're mad.'
     `How do you know I'm mad?' said Alice.
     `You must be,' said the Cat, `or you wouldn't have come here.'
  • On this Day
     Reply #16 - June 19, 2014, 09:32 PM

    On this day, 19th June 1862, slavery was officially outlawed in US territories. with allslaves in Texas freed in 1865. Over two years after the Emancipation Proclamation, slaves in Galveston, Texas, United States, are finally informed of their freedom. The anniversary is still officially celebrated in Texas and 13 other contiguous states as Juneteenth.












    `But I don't want to go among mad people,' Alice remarked.
     `Oh, you can't help that,' said the Cat: `we're all mad here. I'm mad.  You're mad.'
     `How do you know I'm mad?' said Alice.
     `You must be,' said the Cat, `or you wouldn't have come here.'
  • On this Day
     Reply #17 - June 20, 2014, 01:43 AM

    Vive l'empereur! One of the greatest military geniuses.
  • On this Day
     Reply #18 - July 10, 2014, 04:43 PM

    On this day, July 10, 1940, during World War II, the 114-day Battle of Britain began as Nazi forces began attacking southern England by air. By late October, Britain managed to repel the Luftwaffe, which suffered heavy losses. Found some pics I thought I'd share.
































    `But I don't want to go among mad people,' Alice remarked.
     `Oh, you can't help that,' said the Cat: `we're all mad here. I'm mad.  You're mad.'
     `How do you know I'm mad?' said Alice.
     `You must be,' said the Cat, `or you wouldn't have come here.'
  • On this Day
     Reply #19 - July 10, 2014, 04:47 PM

    This pic really caught my eye.



    I just flashed to recent history, the 7/7 bombings. The comparison of these photos is chilling.


    `But I don't want to go among mad people,' Alice remarked.
     `Oh, you can't help that,' said the Cat: `we're all mad here. I'm mad.  You're mad.'
     `How do you know I'm mad?' said Alice.
     `You must be,' said the Cat, `or you wouldn't have come here.'
  • On this Day
     Reply #20 - July 12, 2014, 08:10 AM

    On this day Julius Caeser was born in Rome, 100 B.C.

    Just like Johnny Flynn said, the breath I've taken and the one I must to go on.
  • On this Day
     Reply #21 - July 12, 2014, 07:08 PM

    On this day, I went to a budget supermarket known as Lidl, which can be found in the UK - and had the best ice cream ever.
  • On this Day
     Reply #22 - July 12, 2014, 07:12 PM

    Lidl's ice cream is the best

    "The healthiest people I know are those who are the first to label themselves fucked up." - three
  • On this Day
     Reply #23 - July 12, 2014, 07:13 PM

    Totes.

    Sorry guys for ruining this potentially informative thread.

    But dat ice cream tho.
  • On this Day
     Reply #24 - July 12, 2014, 07:18 PM

    Potentially?

    `But I don't want to go among mad people,' Alice remarked.
     `Oh, you can't help that,' said the Cat: `we're all mad here. I'm mad.  You're mad.'
     `How do you know I'm mad?' said Alice.
     `You must be,' said the Cat, `or you wouldn't have come here.'
  • On this Day
     Reply #25 - July 12, 2014, 07:40 PM

    Fine.

    This informative thread.
  • On this Day
     Reply #26 - July 25, 2014, 04:38 AM

    On this day, 21st July, 1925, in Dayton, Tennessee, ended what was known as the ''monkey trial'' The trail was over a violation of state law by one Mr John T. Scopes who was convicted for teaching Darwin's theory of evolution.

    Scopes, an unassuming high school biology teacher and part-time football coach, is found guilty of teaching evolution in schools, in violation of Tennessee law.

    Scopes agreed, after some persuading by the American Civil Liberties Union and others, to serve as the guinea pig in an attempt to challenge the law on constitutional grounds.

    Famed attorney Clarence Darrow led Scopes’ defense team in what the press quickly dubbed the Monkey Trial. William Jennings Bryan, three-time Democratic nominee for president and a paradoxical blend of progressive conservatism, represented both the state and the fundamentalists who opposed Charles Darwin’s theory.



    The trial took eight days in the sweltering Tennessee summer. National newspapers covered it in detail, including dramatic confrontations between Darrow and Bryan both in and out of the courtroom.



    Whether Scopes actually taught evolution to his biology class remains unclear. He told the court he had done it and would do it again. But he later admitted to a newspaper reporter that though he used a textbook that included a chapter on evolution, he skipped the chapter.

    Darrow expected a guilty verdict and stood ready to appeal the decision to a higher court. The jury did not disappoint him. Scopes was found guilty and fined $100 (almost $1,300 in today’s money). The Tennessee Supreme Court later upheld the constitutionality of the statute but overturned Scopes’ conviction on a technicality.

    Bryan, meanwhile, died only five days after the conclusion of the Monkey Trial.

    The Butler Act, as the anti-evolution law was known, remained on the books in Tennessee until its repeal by the state legislature in 1967.



    Edit: I mixed up the dates originally stating the trail ended today on the 25th.

    `But I don't want to go among mad people,' Alice remarked.
     `Oh, you can't help that,' said the Cat: `we're all mad here. I'm mad.  You're mad.'
     `How do you know I'm mad?' said Alice.
     `You must be,' said the Cat, `or you wouldn't have come here.'
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