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 Topic: Believing in Jihad and Martyrdom

 (Read 16163 times)
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  • Believing in Jihad and Martyrdom
     OP - September 05, 2013, 08:41 AM



    Believing in Jihad and Martyrdom

    by Toona



    I lived my younger years wanting only one thing: martyrdom.

    I wanted to die in battle, in the name of Allah.

    I wanted the peaceful happy death that martyrs appear to experience with a smile on their face.

    I didn't care who I fought or why, as long as I was fighting for Allah under Islamically justifiable conditions.

    Everything in this world was worthless in comparison. You die in the name of Allah, and you get a free pass from all the pain and suffering that awaits everyone else on Judgement Day. You go straight to heaven, and all your sins are forgiven. You believe there is nothing in Islam that's praised as much as Jihad and martyrdom. In fact, it is said in a Hadith that the only person who would ever wish to leave heaven would be the martyrs, who would rather come back to this world only to be martyred again and again.

    I was conditioned from a very young age to think like this. My father believed that there was nothing nobler than to fight and be killed in Jihad.

    Almost everything he talked about would lead me in that direction, whether directly or indirectly.

    Talking about the worthlessness of this life and the impending destruction that awaits civilization made me lose interest in having a normal life.

    Talking about the suffering and torment that awaits the unbelievers in the afterlife made me live in complete terror of losing my faith.

    And finally, talking about the joys of martyrdom made it seem like the only thing in life that's worth fighting for.

    This all happened over the course of the first 18 years of my life, in which I lived with my parents.

    It left me with nothing to live for, except the hope that an apocalyptic war would break out, opening the doors to Jihad, and giving me the chance to fulfil my destiny.

    This was all about my selfish desire for martyrdom, but there is another aspect of my personality that this ideology took advantage of, which is my empathy.

    My sense of empathy was twisted to suit these views.

    A lot of radical Muslims, especially the Jihadists among them, would cheer at the idea of unbelievers being sent to hell. I wasn't like that. I didn't even want to believe in the existence of hell, but I never dared to question it. Yet still, I would cheer when I heard about a terrorist attack, such as the 9/11 atrocity. The death of innocent people didn't matter. We're all going to die one day, and these people might as well die now in the name of a great cause. The suffering of their families is nothing compared to what awaits in the afterlife.

    Think about it like this: the eternal fate of just one person is a far more important matter than the temporary suffering of the thousands of people that are killed in these attacks. I would rather save one person from being tortured in the worst way possible for trillions and trillions of years than to prevent the premature death of the thousands of lives that are lost in these attacks. The idea of eternal hell was so terrible that everything else paled in comparison.

    But who exactly would we be saving through these actions? I didn't know, but I trusted that God's plan had to be a merciful one. In this view, Jihad is the only way of establishing Islam's dominance, and Islam's dominance would be the ultimate salvation for mankind.

    More people would go to heaven, and fewer people would go to hell.

    Isn't that the greatest possible kindness I could do for mankind?

    It also helped that I believed that Islam's dominance would bring peace and prosperity to all of mankind, and whatever the price was, it'll be worth it.

    It doesn't take a genius to see how extremely fragile the logic of it all is, but I had to believe it. That is how I justified the morality of the Jihadist ideology, but the truth is, the purpose of Jihad is not meant to be mercy. The official purpose of Jihad, as stated in the Hadith, is so that Allah's word would be dominant.

    The scary thing is that, even though most Muslims don't think like that, there are traces of this deadly ideology in more Muslims than you'd think, because it is taught in the Quran and the Hadith.

    I've seen children talking about murdering unbelievers, and their parents thinking it's cute. I've heard clerics praying for death and destruction upon all unbelievers, as everyone in the mosque says "Amen". I've seen that even level-headed Muslims may go berserk when their religion is insulted, and call for the death of the blasphemer.

    It's also worth mentioning that a significant percentage of Muslims would say that they would rather see their children die than apostate, and the extremes they might go to stop that from happening are dreadful.

    Jihadists are also often obsessed with Islam's version of the end-of-days scenario, particularly the appearance of the Mahdi (the Sunni version), since that's supposed to be the first of the major signs of Judgement Day.

    The Mahdi is supposed to show up when things are most difficult for Muslims. He will lead Jihad, and bring peace to the world. The worse things get for believers in this ‘dunya’, the more hopeful they become that the time for the Mahdi's appearance is just around the corner. It's a very clever device that prevents them from despairing. I remember hearing people talk about how their dreams imply that the Mahdi was already born, and speculating that he had already arrived in the form of various living Muslim figures.

    It was exhausting, resisting reality that way, but I was willing to hold on to my beliefs. I believed that Allah has made it clear for us that we're on the right path.

    One of the most compelling aspects of Jihadism is the miracles of Jihad and martyrdom. There are so many stories about them. The people who survived Jihad have all kinds of stories to tell, about miracles they experienced in battle. The corpses of martyrs are often said to be immune to decomposition. Some martyrs are said to smell of musk as their blood is spilled. Some die with a peaceful smile on their faces.

    Sometimes all it takes to 'convert' someone is to show them pictures of smiling martyrs, or a video using them to propagate martyrdom. They tend to have an impact powerful enough to make a lot of people say: "I wish I were in their place".

    My worldview only started changing after I left home and became part of a more diverse community, and more so after regular exposure to various non-Islamic cultures through the internet.

    The more time I spent with people from ‘the other side’, the harder it became to believe the things I did.

    It took about 8 years for me to finally rid myself of all that brainwashing.

    I could have easily gone a different way had the wrong people stayed in my life.

    I was lucky to have found my way out of that darkness. It's not always the case, but sometimes all it takes for a person to recover from such destructive beliefs is to be given the chance to appreciate the humanity of non-believers, and the beauty of life, which is probably why the founders of Islam did their best to discourage that.

    Islamic extremists are continually told that disbelievers are inferior to believers, that they are less than animals, and that life is ugly. When we begin to see things differently, when we are exposed to the diversity of the world, the humanity of others, the free exchange of ideas, the extremist world view starts to fall apart.






  • Believing in Jihad and Martyrdom
     Reply #1 - September 05, 2013, 02:04 PM

    This was a fantastic article, Toona. Thanks for writing it and thanks for giving others some insight into that world and its ideology.

    Those of us who grew up with Islam in the 80’s and 90’s can remember permeating effects of that jihadist element, even if we were not full blown jihadists ourselves.

    Up until 9/11, and in some cases, even afterwards, it was not uncommon in mosques across the west to hear pleas for Allah to give victory to the jihadists in this place or in that place or for Allah to destroy this enemy or that enemy. In the Muslim world, that sort of thing is done regularly still.

    Most of us knew someone, or knew someone who knew someone, who was involved in some sort of propagation of jihadist ideology or activity. It was a real and present issue from which few Muslims could honestly claim to be very far removed.

    While I’m in no way suggesting that a majority of Muslims are violent or prone to violence, given just how much of the Qur’an and Hadith literature is clearly devoted towards advocating a violent, aggressive Jihad, it is interesting to see just how much the concept has been ignored by dawah-gandists peddling the “virtues” of the Islamic faith recently.

    Even for me personally, this permeating element of Jihadist ideology had a significant impact towards leading me to accept the Saudi state sponsored version of neo-Salafism, which centered more around the idea of tawheed as opposed to the call to Jihad.

     But even there, it can not be denied that the Saudi regime owes its very existence to the Jihadist rhetoric that influenced the 18th century Bedouin tribes who raided and fought along side Ibn Saud. It wasn’t until after he had firmly established himself on the throne, deposing the ruling Ottoman’s and Hashemites, massacring the ruling elements of the Al Rashid, and waging violent Jihad against Muslims whom they considered to be heretics, did Ibn Saud and his progeny move away from being essentially an early version of the Taliban—an insurgency that used Jihad to secure their authority and monopoly of power.

    While the “war on terror” has caused many Muslims to shy away from public advocacy of Jihad, the fact remains that Islamic literature—particularly end time prophecies—is full of sensational rhetoric about wars, death, and martyrdom. With all that is going on in the world today, I think this is an issue that warrants debate and discussion.

    "God will say, "O Jesus, son of Mary, did you say to the people, 'Make me and my mother gods beside God?" Qur'an 5:116

    "I told them clearly that I am a man...and that they should never make a mistake in assuming or pretending that the human being is emanated from a deity." - Haile Selassie
  • Believing in Jihad and Martyrdom
     Reply #2 - September 05, 2013, 04:31 PM

    Quote
    Chapter 19



    The sun will be turned into darkness



    and the moon into blood before the great and awesome day of the Lord comes    (Joel 2:31)



    the powers of the heavens will be shaken (Matthew 24:29)



    I saw the beast and the kings of the earth and their armies assembled to make war against Him who sat on the horse    (Revelation 19:19)

    The beast and his armies:  "...whom the Lord shall consume with the spirit of his mouth, and shall destroy with the brightness of his coming: even him, whose coming is after the working of Satan with all power and signs and lying wonders, and with all deceivableness of unrighteousness in them that perish; because they received not the love of the truth, that they might be saved."    (2 Thess 2: 8-10)

    The Coming of Christ

    11 And I saw heaven opened, and behold, a white horse, and He who sat on it is called Faithful and True, and in righteousness He judges and wages war.

    12 His eyes are a flame of fire, and on His head are many diadems; and He has a name written on Him which no one knows except Himself.

    13 He is clothed with a robe dipped in blood, and His name is called The Word of God.

    14 And the armies which are in heaven, clothed in fine linen, white and clean, were following Him on white horses.

    15 From His mouth comes a sharp sword, so that with it He may strike down the nations, and He will rule them with a rod of iron; and He treads the wine press of the fierce wrath of God, the Almighty.

    16 And on His robe and on His thigh He has a name written, "KING OF KINGS, AND LORD OF LORDS."

    17 Then I saw an angel standing in the sun, and he cried out with a loud voice, saying to all the birds which fly in midheaven, "Come, assemble for the great supper of God,

    18 so that you may eat the flesh of kings and the flesh of commanders and the flesh of mighty men and the flesh of horses and of those who sit on them and the flesh of all men, both free men and slaves, and small and great."

    19 And I saw the beast and the kings of the earth and their armies assembled to make war against Him who sat on the horse and against His army.

    Doom of the Beast and False Prophet

    20 And the beast was seized, and with him the false prophet who performed the signs in his presence, by which he deceived those who had received the mark of the beast and those who worshiped his image; these two were thrown alive into the lake of fire which burns with brimstone.

    21 And the rest were killed with the sword which came from the mouth of Him who sat on the horse, and all the birds were filled with their flesh.


    http://www.bookofrevelation.net/chap19pt2.htm

    The Islamic version is very boring!  And it betrays a huge mistrust in Allah.  A martyr is someone who is killed for God.  Leave the bloodthirsty stuff to the end times!

    When you are a Bear of Very Little Brain, and you Think of Things, you find sometimes that a Thing which seemed very Thingish inside you is quite different when it gets out into the open and has other people looking at it.


    A.A. Milne,

    "We cannot slaughter each other out of the human impasse"
  • Believing in Jihad and Martyrdom
     Reply #3 - September 05, 2013, 04:38 PM

    BTW, do people realise that heavy American xians support Israel because they see it as a sign of the end times?  They are wetting themselves waiting for Armageddon.

    When you are a Bear of Very Little Brain, and you Think of Things, you find sometimes that a Thing which seemed very Thingish inside you is quite different when it gets out into the open and has other people looking at it.


    A.A. Milne,

    "We cannot slaughter each other out of the human impasse"
  • Believing in Jihad and Martyrdom
     Reply #4 - September 05, 2013, 04:40 PM

    Which raises a question - why do the heavies have to carry out what they perceive as god's will?  Slight lack of faith there isn't there?  Does God need help?

    When you are a Bear of Very Little Brain, and you Think of Things, you find sometimes that a Thing which seemed very Thingish inside you is quite different when it gets out into the open and has other people looking at it.


    A.A. Milne,

    "We cannot slaughter each other out of the human impasse"
  • Believing in Jihad and Martyrdom
     Reply #5 - September 05, 2013, 06:01 PM

    Even Muslims who do not go all in with the jihad and martyrdom thing, are effected by an aspect of Islam raised by this article, i.e. being taught that everything in this life and world is meaningless. Is it any wonder that believing muslims as a group are such underachievers.
    The end time stories also reinforce a kind of apathy towards life and the future. Making islam very much like a doomsday cult.
    When a muslim's life is so wretched because they have not achieved anything or gained any friends or learned how to live in the modern world, they will never look at how islam has robbed them of a normal existence. Instead they will be told that they need to get closer to Allah, then he will make their lives better. And if it doesn't get better..... well it's the end times innit.
  • Believing in Jihad and Martyrdom
     Reply #6 - September 05, 2013, 06:43 PM

    Islamic extremists are continually told that disbelievers are inferior to believers, that they are less than animals, and that life is ugly. When we begin to see things differently, when we are exposed to the diversity of the world, the humanity of others, the free exchange of ideas, the extremist world view starts to fall apart.



    I've often thought this myself. It's a very hopeful end to the article, and I'm grateful you took the time to write it. the insight is both fascinating and terrifying, and not something we should shy away from discussing. Thank you.

    `But I don't want to go among mad people,' Alice remarked.
     `Oh, you can't help that,' said the Cat: `we're all mad here. I'm mad.  You're mad.'
     `How do you know I'm mad?' said Alice.
     `You must be,' said the Cat, `or you wouldn't have come here.'
  • Believing in Jihad and Martyrdom
     Reply #7 - September 05, 2013, 08:06 PM

    In xianity, the end of the world stuff is definitely a minority sport, but with some money and power for example amongst the magachurches and pentecostals.  I get the impression this is more mainstream in Islam.  Is that correct?

    When you are a Bear of Very Little Brain, and you Think of Things, you find sometimes that a Thing which seemed very Thingish inside you is quite different when it gets out into the open and has other people looking at it.


    A.A. Milne,

    "We cannot slaughter each other out of the human impasse"
  • Believing in Jihad and Martyrdom
     Reply #8 - September 07, 2013, 07:19 AM

    That is a very insightful article Toona. It is always great to read the experiences and perspectives of others who have managed to break free from toxic ideologies. And it certainly ends on a positive and hopeful note.
    Thank you for sharing that  Smiley

    Some of the thoughts really echoed with my experience of growing up in the doomsday cult of Jehovah's Witnesses.

  • Believing in Jihad and Martyrdom
     Reply #9 - September 10, 2013, 09:34 AM

    The worse things get for believers in this ‘dunya’, the more hopeful they become that the time for the Mahdi's appearance is just around the corner. It's a very clever device that prevents them from despairing.


    I wouldn't say its "clever". It is downright stupid, unless the goal is to lead the civilization on a path of self destruction.
  • Believing in Jihad and Martyrdom
     Reply #10 - September 10, 2013, 10:00 AM

    The goal is to keep the believers believing at any cost. That's what religions are designed to do. At some point believers would see that things are going nowhere for them and realize that what they've been tricked into believing a load of nonsense, if it weren't for this psychological device that keeps them in a loop.
  • Believing in Jihad and Martyrdom
     Reply #11 - September 10, 2013, 10:04 AM

     pccoffee This is incredibly fascinating for someone who was never a part of this kind of culture.

    `But I don't want to go among mad people,' Alice remarked.
     `Oh, you can't help that,' said the Cat: `we're all mad here. I'm mad.  You're mad.'
     `How do you know I'm mad?' said Alice.
     `You must be,' said the Cat, `or you wouldn't have come here.'
  • Re: Believing in Jihad and Martyrdom
     Reply #12 - September 10, 2013, 10:27 AM

    The Mahdi is supposed to show up when things are most difficult for Muslims. He will lead Jihad, and bring peace to the world. The worse things get for believers in this ‘dunya’, the more hopeful they become that the time for the Mahdi's appearance is just around the corner. It's a very clever device that prevents them from despairing.


    Actually this  is a wholesale importation of the holy spirit realised through the crucifiction and death (conjointly) of the father and son as Utopian communism where the Mahdi is Lenin (or another leader of his calibre) and the muslims are the vanguard who will put an end to all forms of perceived exploitation.

    Messianic impulses actually make a case against islamic eschatology, not for it as sheikhs and snotty-faced mullahs with their cyanogenic odours would have you believe.

    At any rate, for Islamic eschatology to truly run its course one need only completely implement Smith's free market theories. Viva-la-capitalism!
  • Believing in Jihad and Martyrdom
     Reply #13 - September 10, 2013, 11:51 AM

     
    Actually this  is a wholesale importation of the holy spirit realised through the crucifiction and death (conjointly) of the father and son as Utopian communism where the Mahdi is Lenin (or another leader of his calibre) and the muslims are the vanguard who will put an end to all forms of perceived exploitation.

    Messianic impulses actually make a case against islamic eschatology, not for it as sheikhs and snotty-faced mullahs with their cyanogenic odours would have you believe.

    At any rate, for Islamic eschatology to truly run its course one need only completely implement Smith's free market theories. Viva-la-capitalism!

    That is all good and it is OK to blame that stories of holy spirit, Christian  crucifixion  etc..etc ..,  but schizo you completely eliminated or forgotten the role of the story of  alleged Muhammad and  the role of Early Islamic caliphs and later the role of Islamic Mahounds for that  Islamic Jihad eschatology.

    Without that story of Muhammad and without Quran being the word of allah god, all that  Islamic egotistic eschatology becomes a sand domes which falls with the wind.    Once Muslims get educated with taht basics., Muslim & Islam becomes as soft as present Judaism and Christianity ...

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Believing in Jihad and Martyrdom
     Reply #14 - September 10, 2013, 12:05 PM

    That is all good and it is OK to blame that stories of holy spirit, Christian  crucifixion  etc..etc ..,  but schizo you completely eliminated or forgotten the role of the story of  alleged Muhammad and  the role of Early Islamic caliphs and later the role of Islamic Mahounds for that  Islamic Jihad eschatology.

    Without that story of Muhammad and without Quran being the word of allah god, all that  Islamic egotistic eschatology becomes a sand domes which falls with the wind.    Once Muslims get educated with taht basics., Muslim & Islam becomes as soft as present Judaism and Christianity ...


    Yeah, the Mahdi is only explicitly mentioned in the hadith. a 9th century record, by all counts.

    But you do raise a good point, that being the opacity of early islamic historiography — for something that is incontrovertible truth.
  • Believing in Jihad and Martyrdom
     Reply #15 - September 10, 2013, 01:35 PM

    What are some of the common scriptural justifications that are given for the violent jihad movement?
  • Believing in Jihad and Martyrdom
     Reply #16 - September 10, 2013, 02:11 PM

    What are some of the common scriptural justifications that are given for the violent jihad movement?


    well start with this free book monstart..

    Jihad in Islam_slamKotob

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Believing in Jihad and Martyrdom
     Reply #17 - September 11, 2013, 08:47 PM

    I just caught myself singing a Jihad song. I used to love listening and singing those songs or "nasheeds". These tend to have a more powerful effect than the Quran itself. This one in particular, had a special place in my heart, as well as the (dead) guy who's singing it. It had such a powerful effect on me, especially because the guy died exactly the way he desired. The song itself is all about fantasizing about dying in battle. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cXnIzteVCoM

    God, how different things are now. It's so hard for me to wrap my head around the difference between who I was back then and who I am now.

    Phew. Gotta find myself a nice peaceful song to listen to, to wash away the effect.
  • Believing in Jihad and Martyrdom
     Reply #18 - February 25, 2014, 04:09 AM

    http://www.ummah.com/forum/showthread.php?369043-Talking-gets-the-Ummah-no-where

    `But I don't want to go among mad people,' Alice remarked.
     `Oh, you can't help that,' said the Cat: `we're all mad here. I'm mad.  You're mad.'
     `How do you know I'm mad?' said Alice.
     `You must be,' said the Cat, `or you wouldn't have come here.'
  • Believing in Jihad and Martyrdom
     Reply #19 - February 25, 2014, 04:52 AM



    "Why can't we stop talking group every Muslim boy that is 16 and up who are able bodied create our on Muslim army and attack like we should, where has talking gotten us? Absolutely no where! Why aren't men training,why aren't men learning how to shoot bow and arrows, or guns? How come women aren't training on how handle serious and minor wounds..."

    Oh man.
  • Believing in Jihad and Martyrdom
     Reply #20 - February 25, 2014, 04:57 AM

    Just randomly came across that, wanted to post it. A thread about the same subject seemed like the best place.

    `But I don't want to go among mad people,' Alice remarked.
     `Oh, you can't help that,' said the Cat: `we're all mad here. I'm mad.  You're mad.'
     `How do you know I'm mad?' said Alice.
     `You must be,' said the Cat, `or you wouldn't have come here.'
  • Believing in Jihad and Martyrdom
     Reply #21 - February 25, 2014, 05:02 AM

    I guess we should keep our eyes open for the up and coming army of 16 year olds with bows and arrows. Quod Sum Eris, I so envy you for never having been a Muslim! When I see things like this, I feel like I'm being reminded of a super embarrassing ex-boyfriend.
  • Believing in Jihad and Martyrdom
     Reply #22 - February 25, 2014, 05:05 AM

     Cheesy

    `But I don't want to go among mad people,' Alice remarked.
     `Oh, you can't help that,' said the Cat: `we're all mad here. I'm mad.  You're mad.'
     `How do you know I'm mad?' said Alice.
     `You must be,' said the Cat, `or you wouldn't have come here.'
  • Believing in Jihad and Martyrdom
     Reply #23 - February 25, 2014, 06:01 AM

    Bows and arrows? In today's age? Anyway, it was a lovely article Toona. Don't lose hope. The imam in the mosque near my house cries and prays for the salvation of non-Muslims, asks God to bring them to Islam and protect them from His wrath. Whether he really means it or not is another matter. This act is actually teaching us not be violent like the fundamentalists.

    @Yeezevee, with only the Quran as guidance, Islam seems a teensy weensy bit better. That's because if the Quran asks to kill, the Hadith says kill by cutting off the head!
  • Believing in Jihad and Martyrdom
     Reply #24 - February 25, 2014, 06:26 AM

    So he wants allah to protect us from himself?

    `But I don't want to go among mad people,' Alice remarked.
     `Oh, you can't help that,' said the Cat: `we're all mad here. I'm mad.  You're mad.'
     `How do you know I'm mad?' said Alice.
     `You must be,' said the Cat, `or you wouldn't have come here.'
  • Believing in Jihad and Martyrdom
     Reply #25 - February 25, 2014, 06:34 AM

    In one sense yes, ONLY IF he is a secret Jihadist. If a non-Muslim is killed by a Jihadist, that will be God's judgement for that poor individual according to the Muslims.
  • Believing in Jihad and Martyrdom
     Reply #26 - February 25, 2014, 06:36 AM

    Well, thank you allah for making me an atheist and thus damning me to hell and also having the cheek to blame me while at the same time saying you willed it. Dick.

    `But I don't want to go among mad people,' Alice remarked.
     `Oh, you can't help that,' said the Cat: `we're all mad here. I'm mad.  You're mad.'
     `How do you know I'm mad?' said Alice.
     `You must be,' said the Cat, `or you wouldn't have come here.'
  • Believing in Jihad and Martyrdom
     Reply #27 - February 25, 2014, 10:17 AM

    In one sense yes, ONLY IF he is a secret Jihadist. If a non-Muslim is killed by a Jihadist, that will be God's judgement for that poor individual according to the Muslims.


    There is a war on all non-muslims. And all non-strict muslims. Which is called Jihad. You are not that accurate, in my opinion.
  • Believing in Jihad and Martyrdom
     Reply #28 - February 25, 2014, 10:40 AM

    Mate, don't spend so much time on ummah. A lot of muslims just want to live their lives in peace and not hurt anyone.

    `But I don't want to go among mad people,' Alice remarked.
     `Oh, you can't help that,' said the Cat: `we're all mad here. I'm mad.  You're mad.'
     `How do you know I'm mad?' said Alice.
     `You must be,' said the Cat, `or you wouldn't have come here.'
  • Believing in Jihad and Martyrdom
     Reply #29 - February 27, 2014, 04:56 PM

    ^^ True.
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