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 Topic: Morsi ousted by military in Egypt

 (Read 13740 times)
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  • Morsi ousted by military in Egypt
     Reply #60 - July 07, 2013, 10:52 PM

    Any chance of this turning into Algeria of the 90s? There are similarities.
  • Morsi ousted by military in Egypt
     Reply #61 - July 08, 2013, 06:49 AM

    Well, the honeymoon's getting ever shorter, and the Salafist contingent's had enough. The Nour party and their previously endorsed Presidential candidate just bailed after the small matter of live ammunition apparently being used to disperse an MB sit-in.

    This just gets worse and worse.

  • Morsi ousted by military in Egypt
     Reply #62 - July 08, 2013, 09:57 AM

    ‘42 killed’ in shooting at Cairo Republican Guard compound - live updates

    Coverage on Twitter:

    https://twitter.com/kirkpatricknyt
    Quote
    In Egypt dozens of witnesses, including bystanders who hate the Brotherhood, say the protestors were unarmed when the shooting began

    https://twitter.com/Beltrew
    Quote
    Everyone, including doctors, had the same story at the sit-in firing started during dawn prayers,live ammo, birdshot &tear gas used

    https://twitter.com/SameralAtrush
    Quote
    well, the fable seems rather timely ‪http://www.aesopfables.com/cgi/aesop1.cgi?

    https://twitter.com/evanchill

    https://twitter.com/Sarahcarr




  • Morsi ousted by military in Egypt
     Reply #63 - July 08, 2013, 12:43 PM

    Egypt Muslim Brotherhood says 35 dead near army HQ  says news



    Quote
    CAIRO: Egypt's Muslim Brotherhood said on Monday that 35 supporters of ousted president Mohamed Morsi were killed at dawn when security forces opened fire on them as they were praying.

    “Morsi supporters were praying while the police and army fired live rounds and tear gas at them. This led to around 35 dead and the figure is likely to rise,” the Brotherhood said in a statement.

    Earlier, the Egyptian armed forces said “armed terrorists” had tried to storm the headquarters of the elite Republican Guard, where the Brotherhood had been protesting, leaving one security officer dead"


    I hope  these tragedies don't turn into sectarian violence..

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Morsi ousted by military in Egypt
     Reply #64 - July 08, 2013, 01:07 PM

    Thanks for the answers Oz, yeez and zeca Smiley

    Wow, I just had to comment on the awesomeness of that kid Afro
  • Morsi ousted by military in Egypt
     Reply #65 - July 08, 2013, 01:09 PM

    Any chance of this turning into Algeria of the 90s? There are similarities.

    Interesting; the circumstances seem almost identical. We can only hope full-scale civil war and chaos doesn't ensue in Egypt.
  • Morsi ousted by military in Egypt
     Reply #66 - July 08, 2013, 02:16 PM

    Morsi opponents thrown off of roof by Egyptian protesters

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=96uKI-QowFM
    that video needs confirmation of your age..

    Egypt unrest: Mona Makramebeid, professor, American University in Cair
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hYNJNRxvBb0

    So what happened between Gen. Abdul-Fattah el-Sisi.  and Morsi? why Morsi was thrown out?   Is it a personal feud?  Does Sisi   has AMRIKA support??

    Quote
    CAIRO — As President Mohamed Morsi huddled in his guard’s quarters during his last hours as Egypt’s first elected leader, he received a call from an Arab foreign minister with a final offer to end a standoff with the country’s top generals, senior advisers with the president said.  CAIRO—The Army chief came to President Mohammed Morsi with a simple demand: Step down on your own and don’t resist a military ultimatum or the demands of the giant crowds in the streets of Egypt.

    “Over my dead body!” Morsi replied to Gen. Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi on Monday, two days before the Army eventually ousted the Islamist leader after a year in office. In the end, Egypt’s first freely elected president found himself isolated, with allies abandoning him and no one in the Army or police willing to support him.

    Even his Republican Guards simply stepped away as Army commandos came to take him to an undisclosed defense ministry facility, according to Army, security and Muslim Brotherhood officials who gave The Associated Press an account of Morsi’s final hours in office. They spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to talk to the media.

    The Muslim Brotherhood officials said they saw the end coming for Morsi as early as June 23—a week before the opposition planned its first big protest. The military gave the president seven days to work out his differences with the opposition.  Early this week, during two meetings in as many days, Morsi, el-Sissi and Hesham Kandil, the Islamist-backed prime minister, sat down to discuss ways out of the crisis in which millions of Egyptians were clamoring for the president to resign.

    But Morsi kept returning to the mandate he won in the June 2012 balloting, according to one of the officials. He said Morsi wouldn’t deal with the mass protests or any of the country’s most pressing problems—tenuous security, rising prices, unemployment, power cuts and traffic congestion. A Brotherhood spokesperson, Murad Ali, said the military had already decided that Morsi had to go, and el-Sissi would not entertain any of the concessions that the president was prepared to make.

    According to one official, Morsi delivered the final, terse response to el-Sissi’s demand: “Over my dead body!”


     Well Over My Dead Body lead to this mess..

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Morsi ousted by military in Egypt
     Reply #67 - July 08, 2013, 08:45 PM

    Sarah Carr's article on the latest events is worth reading:

    On sheep and infidels
  • Morsi ousted by military in Egypt
     Reply #68 - July 08, 2013, 11:24 PM

    Is this a fair analysis of what's happening? If so it is very elucidating....

    Quote
    Islam's civil war moves to Egypt

    "Only Saudi Arabia with its $630 billion of cash reserves has the wherewithal to bridge Egypt's $20 billion a year cash gap. With the country's energy supplies nearly exhausted and just two months' supply of imported wheat on hand, the victor in Cairo will be the Saudi party."

    "The question is not whether Islamism, but whose."

    "Whether Egypt slides into chaos or regains temporary stability under the military depends on what happens in the royal palace at Riyadh, not in Tahrir Square. It appears that the Saudis have embraced the military-backed government, whoever it turns out to include."


    http://www.atimes.com/atimes/Middle_East/MID-01-080713.html

    I can understand why the Saudis would fear the Brotherhood, isn't their stated goal to bring back a global Caliphate? If so that would mean the toppling of the Saudis. In which case the protesters of Tahrir Square are just a pawn in a power struggle between two powerful Islamists...
  • Morsi ousted by military in Egypt
     Reply #69 - July 08, 2013, 11:51 PM

    It’s no secret that the Saudi regime is very much against the MB and Qutbist ideology. Even when I was a salafi, I was very much opposed to the Muslim Brotherhood primarily because of the radical and “takfiri” nature of Sayyed Qutb’s writings. The Saudis use what I would consider to be sound religious objections to the brotherhood’s manifesto in order to advance their own interest now. What is interesting, however, is that much of what they accuse the brotherhood of now were actually the very hallmarks of the founders of Saudi Arabia and their puritanical, wahhabi doctrines.  
  • Morsi ousted by military in Egypt
     Reply #70 - July 08, 2013, 11:57 PM

    It’s no secret that the Saudi regime is very much against the MB and Qutbist ideology. Even when I was a.................

    I hate to say this but  if there no other chances/choices  and I am forced to choose one,    between the two I go for MB. If these guys were successful that would have solved sand land problems way in 1979....

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Morsi ousted by military in Egypt
     Reply #71 - July 09, 2013, 12:11 AM

    The MB today are NOT who they were in the 60s and 70s. Then, they were essentially a radical terrorist organization. Years of persecution has meant that they have morphed into a more toothless political movement. It’ll be interesting (and maybe kinda scary) to see where they go from here.
  • Morsi ousted by military in Egypt
     Reply #72 - July 09, 2013, 12:13 AM

    Care to elaborate Yeez?

    Why would you choose MB over a Saudi backed government in Egypt? Is MB really the lesser of two evils?
  • Morsi ousted by military in Egypt
     Reply #73 - July 09, 2013, 02:34 AM

    Care to elaborate Yeez?

    Why would you choose MB over a Saudi backed government in Egypt? Is MB really the lesser of two evils?

    I will answer your question if  you answer my question Tonyt  Cheesy

    Any ways,  MB that was started by school teacher Hassan al-Banna was actually an Islamic reform movement  that was against Islamic feudal structure  such as Caliphs and was against  British rule in Egypt. So it was not an evil Islamic organization to start with unlike Wahhabism which is total evil in every way.    MB was/is at best played/plays  these Islamic political games  in and around Egypt,  where as Wahhabism controls whole world through its  Oil wealth/potbelly kings  and AMRIKA support.    The land of free along with  land of sand  used Islam to create more problems around the globe Tonyt...

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Morsi ousted by military in Egypt
     Reply #74 - July 09, 2013, 09:51 AM

    Is this a fair analysis of what's happening? If so it is very elucidating....

    http://www.atimes.com/atimes/Middle_East/MID-01-080713.html

    I can understand why the Saudis would fear the Brotherhood, isn't their stated goal to bring back a global Caliphate? If so that would mean the toppling of the Saudis. In which case the protesters of Tahrir Square are just a pawn in a power struggle between two powerful Islamists...


    Some analysis along the same lines:

    Quote
    With June 30, 2013, the planned day of protest against Islamist president Mohammed Mursi, the forces ranged against the ruler were significantly different, suggesting wider scope for manipulation. Firstly, they included key elements in the state itself: the army, the security services, and media and business interests linked to the old regime. Secondly, two Gulf states had a major stake in seeing the Brotherhood dethroned.

    On the first, the National Salvation Front (NSF), which had proved useless as an effective opposition force, openly sided with former National Democratic Party and other former regime figures in the weeks ahead of the June 30 ‘Tamarrod’ protest. The attacks on Muslim Brotherhood offices in recent weeks and months appeared to be coordinated and reflected a wider policy of baiting the group and elements of the ‘deep state’ refusing to cooperate with its rule. Brotherhood figures are saying they sensed from June 23 that the military was planning something against them, citing Western ambassadors no less, and in hindsight they consider that Sisi had been playing them and their hapless president all along. If Islamist media spewed hate speech night and day, the ‘liberal’ media was no better, with an incessant anti-Brotherhood discourse since the day Mursi took office, centred on the idea of ‘akhwanat al-dawla‘, or Brotherhoodization of the state, and Egypt beholden to the Brotherhood’s backers in Qatar.

    Externally, Dubai’s police chief Dhahi Khalfan announced yesterday that he would no longer tweet since his mission was accomplished after the military forced Mursi out – he dedicated the last year to sending thousands of anti-Brotherhood messages on Twitter. Other key UAE tweeters consistently denigrated the Brotherhood, while the UAE prosecuted dozens of Emirati citizens on suspicion of membership of a local Brotherhood chapter accused of plotting to overthrow the system. The UAE was the one of the first countries to welcome Mursi’s ouster in a gleeful official statement and Ahmed Shafiq, the failed ancien regime candidate in the election Mursi won last year, boasted in private that he was managing events from his base in Abu Dhabi. That may well have been hyperbole, but one tweeter reported early on June 30 from a “source” that Egypt’s military was estimating three million people were already on the streets – an indication of some kind of cross-region collaboration going on. Shafiq also predicted confidently in one media report that the Brotherhood’s reign would end by the time the week was out.

    Similarly, Saudi Arabia’s king was the first to welcome the new order after Saudi-owned Al Arabiya TV gave full coverage to the protests of the past week. Defence Minister and supreme council of armed forces (SCAF) head Abdulfattah al-Sisi, who managed Mursi’s ouster, is close to Saudi Arabia where he served as military attache and the military’s choice for interim president, Adly Mansour, was a legal consultant to the Saudi Ministry of Trade from 1983 to 1990 – indeed, Israeli Shin Bet chief Avi Dichter described him as “Mubarak’s man in Saudi Arabia”. Jamal Khashoggi, a journalist and government official in the entourage of Prince Turki al-Faisal, shifted from anti-Shi’ite tweets in recent weeks, to tweets praising the official Wahhabi clerics of Saudi Arabia, to Brotherhood-sympathetic tweets during the past week, this last being his default position with Western media where he presents himself as a liberal Islamist close to the Brotherhood. As a Saudi opposition figure said, given Khashoggi’s role as a front for Al Saud survival policy, his sudden shift to pro-Brotherhood messaging was suggestive of Saudi mischievousness and close Saudi involvement in the Egyptian events (though at what stage and at what level, if any, we cannot know). It should be noted that Turki al-Faisal ran an operation out of the Saudi embassy in Egypt that quietly promoted Salafism as a counterweight to the Brotherhood after Mubarak fell.

    Mursi’s fall is for Saudi Arabia a message for its own Brotherhood contingent, a mix of religious scholars such as Awad al-Garni and Islamist activists, that they won’t succeed in repeating the Egyptian experiment in democratic politics in the kingdom. As Saudi political activist Hamza al-Hassan tweeted: “The breaking of the Brotherhood has given comfort to Al Saud – there won’t be a revolution against them now, the Islamists inside the country won’t be able to repeat the Egypt experience.” The wider aim of Al Saud is to make sure no democratic shift in the immediate vicinity is successful. The Mursi presidency was a double threat because it was Islamist rule brought about via the ballot box, challenging not only Al Saud’s absolute power but its Islamic claims to legitimacy.


    http://hammonda.net/?p=1632
  • Morsi ousted by military in Egypt
     Reply #75 - July 09, 2013, 10:19 AM

    Christopher Hitchens alluded to the Muslim Brotherhood and a related problem.

    http://www.tabletmag.com/jewish-news-and-politics/32880/fundamentals

    Quote
    “Look here upon this picture, and on this …” In the left frame, a privileged young Swiss-Egyptian academic, whose father and grandfather were pillars of the Muslim Brotherhood and who has expressed strong sympathy for the jihadist preachings—and social and moral precepts—of Sheikh Yusuf al-Qaradawi, purveyor of fatwas and self-described “Mufti of martyrdom operations.” In the right frame, a young woman from Somalia who has endured genital mutilation and forced marriage, made her escape to Europe, spoken out for the rights of women, seen a colleague of hers murdered for the same advocacy, abandoned religion for the values of the European enlightenment, and now conducts her life under permanent police protection.

    Which of these two individuals garners the most respectful attention from our liberal intellectuals?...


    When you are a Bear of Very Little Brain, and you Think of Things, you find sometimes that a Thing which seemed very Thingish inside you is quite different when it gets out into the open and has other people looking at it.


    A.A. Milne,

    "We cannot slaughter each other out of the human impasse"
  • Morsi ousted by military in Egypt
     Reply #76 - July 09, 2013, 01:41 PM

    Democracy isn't how the first leader is elected, it's how he steps down and ushers in the next leader.

    Being all excited about one free elections and calling it democracy is far from it. It has obviously failed and the people will have to try over again.  whistling2  I don't think the Muslim world are ready for democracy yet, until they are ok with separating Islam from politics.

    ***~Church is where bad people go to hide~***
  • Morsi ousted by military in Egypt
     Reply #77 - July 09, 2013, 06:43 PM

    Mohamed El Baradei Appointed As Egypt's Vice President, Hazem El Bablawi Becomes Prime Minister

    Quote
    AIRO — Egypt's army chief says the military will not accept political "maneuvering," in thinly veiled warning to the only Islamist party that sided with the army's removal of President Mohammed Morsi but has since had frictions with other factions over forming a new leadership.

    Defense Minister Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi said Tuesday in a statement carried by state TV that "the future of the nation is too important and sacred for maneuvers or hindrance, whatever the justifications."

    The statement appears to refer to days of political stalemate after an ultraconservative party, Al-Nour, objected to two nominees for prime minister and outright blocked one of them, pro-reform leader Mohamed ElBaradei. El-Sissi's statement comes shortly after a prominent economist Hazem el-Beblawi was named prime minister.

    well that is most recent news.... Well it doesn't matter who the hell is in this interim government .,  The goal should be going to elections with in 2 months.. And make sure more than 80% eligible voters  will go to the polls.. Any eligible RASCAL who don't go for  voting  must be fined some 10000 Egyptian pounds..


    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Morsi ousted by military in Egypt
     Reply #78 - July 10, 2013, 11:38 AM

    Egypt: Is political Islam dead?  writes a PROFESSOR ..     Let me put some nuggets that were cooked by him..
    Quote
    A recent image coming from Egypt shows a large group of people praying in the city of Arish, and suddenly, as they lie on the ground, prostrate, the security forces unleash a volley of live bullets at them, injuring and killing several people.........

    ..........
    Still more recently, security forces shot into a group of people as they prostrated in prayer at dawn in Cairo, killing at least thirty and wounding hundreds. In these instances, the great Egyptian democratic revolutionaries are not offended or outraged. They are shockingly and shamelessly silent..........
    Quote
    ........... Now that the streets of Egypt have once again become drenched with the blood of civilians and the prisons have become full of political dissidents, the losers and winners must be assessed in a very different way............

    Quote
    The reality is that the Muslim Brotherhood believed in the political process and tried to practice it. Like the Salvation Front of Algeria before them, they believed that democracy and Islamism are reconcilable, and that it is possible to build an overlapping moral consensus with non-Islamists. The Muslim Brotherhood were consistently accused of being exclusionary and of functioning with a tribal mentality. Ironically, their opponents adopted a no less exclusionary discourse of calling the Muslim Brotherhood fascists and Nazis - an accusation as bad as being called infidels or sinners. While the Muslim Brotherhood showed that they are no angels and are subject to all the flaws of political competitors, Egyptian secularists once again demonstrated that their commitment to human rights and civil values is fickle at best.

    Quote
    Egyptian secularists were outraged when the comedian Bassem Youssef was harassed by Morsi’s government, but were blissfully untroubled when the only television station owned by the Brotherhood was closed down without legal cause or process.

    They were outraged when Morsi infringed upon the non-existing integrity and independence of the Egyptian Supreme Court, but the same secularists are blissfully untroubled when the military abrogates a constitution that was passed by a popular vote, and hands over executive, legislative, and judicial power to a judge who boasts a long career of service to Mubarak’s authoritarian regime.  Worst of all, Egyptian secularists were outraged when an anti-Morsi demonstrator was injured or killed but are shockingly unperturbed when those killed are suspected of being Islamists or pro-Islamists.

     What has been dealt a deathblow after the Egyptian coup is moderate Islamism. ..................

    Let me stop right there..  And you support  moderate Islamism?
    I don't know what the hell is this  "Moderate Islamism" ??  
    Why this  "Moderate Islamism" business in politics?
    And all those non-Islamist in  Egypt, are they not Muslim folks??
    Why are you raining   your Islamic cough syrup on them?

    My good professor should know how little time  it takes for a sheep that is in  "Moderate Islamism" to turn in to a wolf..  

    Well that is from A professor of Political Science,    a  J.D.  BD, DD, M.A., Ph.D.  in Islamic law  and  Islamic jurisprudence, Off course he is from AMRIKA  and was appointed in the departments that were created by the donated money of allah loving kings from sand lands..  read it all at the link..

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Morsi ousted by military in Egypt
     Reply #79 - July 10, 2013, 01:13 PM

    Interesting article Yeez, the author does have a point though. Some of the secularists are being a little bit hypocritical by trying to say that it is not a military coup. It is a military coup against a democratically elected leader who has acted undemocratic by jailing people for criticizing him and his ideology.

    I am dead against Morsi, but lets be honest, it is a military coup. It may have backing from a large segment of the population but so do most military coups.

    There was a report on BBC news this morning about a guy who was jailed for criticizing Morsi but has been released now that Morsi has been deposed. Why was that? Is there no separation between judiciary and executive powers in Egypt? If that is the case then does that mean that there is hope for all those people that were jailed for blasphemy under Brotherhood rule? Like that guy Karam Saber that Yeez posted about a couple of weeks ago.
  • Morsi ousted by military in Egypt
     Reply #80 - July 10, 2013, 01:43 PM

    Interesting article Yeez, the author does have a point though. Some of the secularists are being a little bit hypocritical by trying to say that it is not a military coup. It is a military coup against a democratically elected leader who has acted undemocratic by jailing people for criticizing him and his ideology.


    keeping those underlined words in mind .,  Democracy in Egypt or many Islamic lands are in an  extremely nascent state,  which I call it as "Islamic democracy" not democracy.,  because by definition "Religion should have NO role in a democracy .. including the voting pattern of people..

    I will wait at least couple of months before I say it is Coup.  or A sheep in wolf cloth is controlling Egypt.   Whatever this interim govt may be, they must announce elections/date with in two months... I believe in people of Egypt.. they Are NOT Bedouin baboons.. they are much smarter., Ideally Morsi should have resigned and/or threaten for another elections.. Although he was controlled by brothelhood party,  I know that guy was not  bad guy and I know elections are expensive  business in these tough times.  The problem every where is "HAVE's and HAVE NOTs "

     Now the problem in Egypt future  is with external forces    interfering in Egypt including Islamic forces ..Even West...   I just read.. the sand land kings announced 10 billion dollar to support Egypt's failing economy as if it is there  grand father's  money.. not Oil from underground...

      

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Morsi ousted by military in Egypt
     Reply #81 - July 10, 2013, 03:50 PM

    Democracy isn't how the first leader is elected, it's how he steps down and ushers in the next leader.

    Being all excited about one free elections and calling it democracy is far from it. It has obviously failed and the people will have to try over again.  whistling2  I don't think the Muslim world are ready for democracy yet, until they are ok with separating Islam from politics.


    Sadly, I think this is the case though Tunisia is doing alright -- even with an Islamist government -- though they already had a relatively secular society by Muslim standards to begin with.
  • Morsi ousted by military in Egypt
     Reply #82 - July 10, 2013, 10:43 PM

    Open Democracy: What Algeria 1992 can, and cannot, teach us about Egypt 2013

    Tariq Ramadan: Coup d'état, act II

    Merip: Egypt in year three

    Tahrir ICN: No MB, no army: the revolution continues

    Al-Monitor: First look at Egypt's constitutional declaration

    Evan Hill: "Ceci n'est pas un coup"
  • Morsi ousted by military in Egypt
     Reply #83 - July 11, 2013, 06:13 PM

    well Egypt is burning and the news says US 'set to deliver' F-16s to Egypt
    Quote
    The US is pressing ahead with plans to deliver four F-16 fighters to Egypt despite a military coup against President Mohammed Morsi, a US official says.   "It's still the status quo," the official, who spoke on condition of anonymity, said on Thursday.

    There was no decision to halt the scheduled transfer of the warplanes or to cut off other security assistance to Egypt, the official said, even though the US government has announced a review of all aid to Cairo. The Pentagon says it remains dedicated to maintaining longstanding military ties with Egypt and that the US wants to see a prompt return to civilian, democratic rule.

    "Looking forward, we will work with the Egyptian people to support a quick and responsible return to a sustainable, democratically elected civilian government," the Pentagon said in a statement.

    Quote
    The F-16s are part of an arms deal with Egypt approved in 2010 that calls for the supply of 20 of the fighter jets. Egypt has received more than 220 F-16 fighters since 1980 and has the world's fourth largest F-16 fleet, behind the United States, Israel and Turkey.


    With Egypt gripped by intense political turmoil, the Obama administration has relied on the US military's deep ties with the Egyptian armed forces as its main channel for diplomacy. ...

    What the hell you guys do with those toys each costing some 15 million dollars or so when there is no food in the town?  why do you need them??  AMRIKA is a great country for making expensive toys and sell them to 3rd world heroes who control political/economical power  and their kids live in west in million dollars mansions..,  well that is the news...

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Morsi ousted by military in Egypt
     Reply #84 - July 27, 2013, 04:12 PM

    More than 100 people have been killed and 1,500 injured says news..

    More than 100 people have been killed and 1,500 injured at a protest held by supporters of ousted Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi in Cairo, doctors say. However the health ministry has put the death toll lower, at 38. The army ousted Mr Morsi on 3 July. He has been formally accused of murder, relating to a 2011 jail outbreak, and of links to the militant group Hamas.

    Both pro- and anti-Morsi demonstrators held huge protests overnight in the capital. The anti-Morsi camp occupied Cairo's Tahrir Square in support of the army, after its chief, Gen Abdel Fattah al-Sisi, had urged people to demonstrate to provide a mandate for its intervention. Meanwhile, tens of thousands of Morsi supporters continued their sit-in protest at the mosque in the Nasr City area.

    On Saturday, Interior Minister Mohammed Ibrahim vowed to end the sit-in, saying local residents had complained about the encampment.....[/quote]

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nu6Z63mrkro

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NLQmA_lGg8Y

    Mubarak to Assad to Morsi to..X...to..Y...to..Z.....   THIS PROBLEMS WILL CONTINUE

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Morsi ousted by military in Egypt
     Reply #85 - July 28, 2013, 01:40 AM

    Egypt.. Egypt .. Egypt Crying Everywhere..



    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z0a8mSNSElo

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H6qgVsJKIuY

    It is clear Egypt  highly polarized and the country cannot continue to be led by a general. It must get back to elections put elected members to rule the country. No doubt that Morsi with his connections to brothelhood, he  ruled  the country without consultation, tried to sneak in  Brothelhood values in to his government  and ignored the aspirations of the people  who helped get rid of Mubarak.

    The problem now is guy with glasses.,     I wonder about that guy  Gen Abdul Fatah al-Sisi  when he is going to remove his   sun glasses. The sooner the better for whole region.

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Morsi ousted by military in Egypt
     Reply #86 - July 28, 2013, 11:57 AM

    Is this a good thing or a bad thing?


    in islam, ur supposed to obey the ruler. so military took him off. no wonder MB is pissed off big time and according to islam, they "have the right to protest against such". however since morsi involved in dirty things with hamas and other problems that Egyptians in general faces during one year so the oust of him by military was kind of necessarily. now cos mb protesters, they believe it to be jihad to protect their ruler especially someone to be upon islam ideology, he's not even finished 4 years, like we see in news, they literally went for it. now its army shooting at them and some are dead, over 100 already last few days or so. that will even pisses mb and its supporters even more. although the military did warned that they will turn to guns if mosri supporters turns to violence. like i said they, morsi supporters, believe it to be legitimate to protect their ruler as part of jihad for the sake of islam. so  its a bit of messed up now. a bit like i wish the military used rubber bullets instead, or the likes. without killings...
  • Morsi ousted by military in Egypt
     Reply #87 - July 28, 2013, 11:59 AM

    and ill just say this, i bet MB takes the power back someday. that's what i think. however i hope im wrong.
  • Morsi ousted by military in Egypt
     Reply #88 - July 28, 2013, 02:40 PM

    and ill just say this, i bet MB takes the power back someday. that's what i think. however i hope im wrong.


    People change, some in Muslim brothelhood could change and can come back to power  by winnign elections .. But not in the way they are now and the way they came to power.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OStnW3dM70M

    Rogues beat up little kids for silly words..  These fools must know that  Cameras are everywhere in this 21st century.   In any case that Sisi  guy must announce elections dates., he can not be in power without winning elections.  In the last elections more than 48% people didn't vote in that elections. And that is the reason this guy Morsi came in to power..

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Morsi ousted by military in Egypt
     Reply #89 - July 28, 2013, 03:33 PM

    just seen all videos you post above, fascinating.
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