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 Topic: Morsi ousted by military in Egypt

 (Read 13762 times)
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  • Morsi ousted by military in Egypt
     Reply #30 - July 06, 2013, 11:41 AM

    That kid is amazing

    "we can smell traitors and country haters"


    God is Love.
    Love is Blind. Stevie Wonder is blind. Therefore, Stevie Wonder is God.

  • Morsi ousted by military in Egypt
     Reply #31 - July 06, 2013, 11:57 AM

    Quote
    I think his removal happened way too quickly. Islamists now have a genuine grievance at their treatment. It would have been better to have given the brotherhood longer, and to even have let them see out their full term. That way, the message would have been clearer that Morsi and his Islamic experiment had failed. Instead, now there will always be doubt. Plus, unless your leader is Hitler, coups are never a good thing. And this particular coup has led to a dangerous polarisation from which it is now difficult to see a way out. Things are already really ugly now; the army has fucked up big-time IMO.


    I agree with you that MB should have been given more time but regarding the implementation of Islamic policies,even if they had been given time and it failed, they will still remain stubborn and air their grievances saying if this or that has been modified, it would have worked.

    "I'm standing here like an asshole holding my Charles Dickens"

    "No theory,No ready made system,no book that has ever been written to save the world. i cleave to no system.."-Bakunin
  • Morsi ousted by military in Egypt
     Reply #32 - July 06, 2013, 12:28 PM

    Quote
      30 people died and hundreds were hurt in the clashes, says BBC news

    Egypt's 'day of rejection' - Friday 5 July as it happened

    • At least 30 reported to have died across country
    • African Union suspends Egypt after coup
    • Tens of thousand gather for Muslim Brotherhood rallies
    • ElBaradei defends roundup of brotherhood leaders
    • Police break-up pro-Morsi rally in Zagazig
    • Obama urges swift return to democratic government


    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XiLCNwWYvcE

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AdFk-v-4G0o

    Look at this   brothelhood hero .. shoots people right in the back   on the road..  And off course on top of it they will  blame Police..

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Morsi ousted by military in Egypt
     Reply #33 - July 06, 2013, 12:52 PM

    Coptic priest shot dead by Gunmen in Egypt  says news

    Quote
    Gunmen shot dead a Coptic Christian priest in Egypt's lawless Northern Sinai on Saturday in what could be the first sectarian attack since the military overthrow of Islamist President Mohamed Mursi, security sources said. The priest, Mina Aboud Sharween, was attacked in the early afternoon while walking in the Masaeed area in El Arish.

    The shooting in the coastal city was one of several attacks believed to be by Islamist insurgents that included firing at four military checkpoints in the region, the sources said. Saturday's attacks on checkpoints took place in al-Mahajer and al-Safaa in Rafah, as well as Sheikh Zuwaid and al-Kharouba.

    The violence follows attacks in which five police offers were killed in El Arish on Friday.

    Mursi's Muslim Brotherhood has fiercely criticized Coptic Pope Tawadros, spiritual leader of Egypt's 8 million Christians, for giving his blessing to the removal of the president and attending the announcement by armed forces commander General Abdel Fattah al-Sisi suspending the constitution.


    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Morsi ousted by military in Egypt
     Reply #34 - July 06, 2013, 04:08 PM


    That's fucking beautiful. Made me cry.

    Too fucking busy, and vice versa.
  • Morsi ousted by military in Egypt
     Reply #35 - July 06, 2013, 04:34 PM

    That kid is amazing

    Yes.
    I agree with you that MB should have been given more time but regarding the implementation of Islamic policies,even if they had been given time and it failed, they will still remain stubborn and air their grievances saying if this or that has been modified, it would have worked.

    You're right. Problem is, the way it's been done now, I actually agree with their gripe.

    Hi
  • Morsi ousted by military in Egypt
     Reply #36 - July 06, 2013, 04:53 PM

    It definitely sets a bad precedent to be followed by whoever inevitably disagrees with the next democratically elected leader. Of course it's easy for me to speak from the comfort of my own functioning democratic country, but I would have preferred to see the military support Morsi until his term ended. If you don't like him, vote him and his cronies out once their time is up. That's how it works.
  • Morsi ousted by military in Egypt
     Reply #37 - July 06, 2013, 04:58 PM

    But what happens when the President is acting unlawfully and arguably treasonably? 

    When you are a Bear of Very Little Brain, and you Think of Things, you find sometimes that a Thing which seemed very Thingish inside you is quite different when it gets out into the open and has other people looking at it.


    A.A. Milne,

    "We cannot slaughter each other out of the human impasse"
  • Morsi ousted by military in Egypt
     Reply #38 - July 06, 2013, 05:10 PM

    Impeachment or the expiration of their term. The country will suffer if they continue with the trend of having a revolution every two years.
  • Morsi ousted by military in Egypt
     Reply #39 - July 06, 2013, 05:31 PM

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/German_federal_election,_March_1933

    The Nazis were democratically elected too. By a landslide. Didn't work out all that great.



    "Blessed are they who can laugh at themselves, for they shall never cease to be amused."
  • Morsi ousted by military in Egypt
     Reply #40 - July 06, 2013, 05:43 PM

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J3xUCK33HNg

    Strange video .. It says "Military attacks against the Islamists while they pray the prayer of Asr in Arijsh (in egypt)"   

    That looks like Staged movie Pallywood in action..

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Morsi ousted by military in Egypt
     Reply #41 - July 06, 2013, 05:54 PM

    Democracy never guarantees that a good government will be voted into office. If it is adhered to, however, it can guarantee that a bad government gets voted out.

    I'm no fan of the MB at all, but ousting Morsi in a military coup only plays into the Islamist narrative that democracy is not the answer.

    If he is guilty of violating the constitution, try him in open hearings and have him impeached. Let those reasons be clear to all. As it stands, even on this forum of intelligent and insightful people, we can't place our fingers on exactly why he was ousted...apart of course from the fact that lots of angry people protested in the streets.

    The fear that I have is that the supporters of the MB, which make up a huge portion of the Egyptian population (enough to vote Morsi in to begin with in free and fair elections) will see no reason to air their grievances democratically any longer.

    This will feed into the less than subtle influences of the qutbists and the salafists. We will be lucky if they only resort to street demonstrations.

    I would have preferred to let the MB fuck everything up as they inevitably would have, let the people get fed up with them and understand that, contrary to the slogan, Islam is not the solution, and let them vote the bastard out in the next free and fair elections.
  • Morsi ousted by military in Egypt
     Reply #42 - July 06, 2013, 06:00 PM

    From wiki link above

    Quote
    Within four months, the other parties had been eliminated either by formal banning or Nazi terror, and Germany was firmly a one-party state.


    The Muslim Brotherhood may be guilty of not acting in their interests quickly enough....

    When you are a Bear of Very Little Brain, and you Think of Things, you find sometimes that a Thing which seemed very Thingish inside you is quite different when it gets out into the open and has other people looking at it.


    A.A. Milne,

    "We cannot slaughter each other out of the human impasse"
  • Morsi ousted by military in Egypt
     Reply #43 - July 06, 2013, 06:28 PM

    Democracy never guarantees that a good government will be voted into office. If it is adhered to, however, it can guarantee that a bad government gets voted out.

    I'm no fan of the MB at all, but ousting Morsi in a military coup only plays into the Islamist narrative that democracy is not the answer.

    If he is guilty of violating the constitution, try him in open hearings and have him impeached. Let those reasons be clear to all. As it stands, even on this forum of intelligent and insightful people, we can't place our fingers on exactly why he was ousted...apart of course from the fact that lots of angry people protested in the streets.

    The fear that I have is that the supporters of the MB, which make up a huge portion of the Egyptian population (enough to vote Morsi in to begin with in free and fair elections) will see no reason to air their grievances democratically any longer.

    This will feed into the less than subtle influences of the qutbists and the salafists. We will be lucky if they only resort to street demonstrations.

    I would have preferred to let the MB fuck everything up as they inevitably would have, let the people get fed up with them and understand that, contrary to the slogan, Islam is not the solution, and let them vote the bastard out in the next free and fair elections.


    Wish I had the intelligence and coherence to put it like that, but I totally agree with all of that, big man  Afro

    Hi
  • Morsi ousted by military in Egypt
     Reply #44 - July 06, 2013, 07:35 PM

    Mohamed ElBaradei officially appointed Egypt's new PM says news

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TDs1XfNRKjs

    Quote
    A presidential source said on Saturday evening that Mohamed ElBaradei, the general coordinator of the National Salvation Front, has already been assigned the post of prime minister. “He accepted and will be shortly sworn in,” the source, who spoke on condition of anonymity, told Ahram Online.

    According to an official source, the choice of ElBaradei came after the military failed to convince Central Bank Governor Hisham Ramez to accept the job. Farouk El-Oqda, Ramez's predecessor, also declined the post.  A graduate of the faculty of law at Cairo University, ElBaradei joined the Foreign Service before he launched his international career.

    In 2009, ElBaradei who was just finishing his post as head of the International Atomic Energy Agency, offered a new addition to the small number of voices calling for an end to the rule of Hosni Mubarak, who was later ousted by the 25 January Revolution. Upon his arrival in Egypt, ElBaradei called on Egyptians to sign petitions to end Mubarak’s rule and foil a scheme to pass power to Mubarak’s son, Gamal.

    His call was supported by rank-and-file Egyptians as by top intellectuals. Following the removal of Mubarak, ElBaradei was called on by his supporters to run for president, but declined, saying he did not want to join the political race, especially in the absence of a clear constitution.

    Nobel peace prize laureate ElBaradei had been a leading opposition figure since the 2011 revolution, having been one of the most prominent figures to foresee and call for the uprising that put an end to Mubarak's 30-year rule....

     Huh!  that  nuke guy is back in action?? Sure MB will go to streets shouting at him as juice controlled western poodle..  Egypt better go for elections as soon as possible...

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Morsi ousted by military in Egypt
     Reply #45 - July 06, 2013, 07:48 PM

    Hmm ............

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oBGU1FxknYI

    No doubt.. ...........no doubt after watching those two tubes this guy  is DANGEROUS.. . An Apostate in  Islamic clothes.

    JIHAD............JIHAD............alllahhhhhoooo akbaaaar..    Takbeer..   beeeeer.....TAKE BEER  ....yeeeeeeha....hhooo haaaaa  grow beard and make noise on trees and streets..

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Morsi ousted by military in Egypt
     Reply #46 - July 06, 2013, 09:24 PM

    Quote
    The fear that I have is that the supporters of the MB, which make up a huge portion of the Egyptian population


    I understand they are actually a very small, but well organised group, who got support by giving out bread and various social services, and got the vote out when needed amongst illiterate people.

    I think I saw some polls showing they are actually not at all popular.  They are very good at being noisy and getting out rentamob.

    When you are a Bear of Very Little Brain, and you Think of Things, you find sometimes that a Thing which seemed very Thingish inside you is quite different when it gets out into the open and has other people looking at it.


    A.A. Milne,

    "We cannot slaughter each other out of the human impasse"
  • Morsi ousted by military in Egypt
     Reply #47 - July 06, 2013, 09:39 PM

    BBC has a very good summary of issues

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-12313405

    Quote
    After a failed attempt to assassinate President Gamal Abdul Nasser in 1954, the Ikhwan were blamed, banned, and thousands of members imprisoned and tortured. The group continued, however, to grow underground.

    This clash with the authorities prompted an important shift in the ideology of the Ikhwan, evident in the writing of one prominent member, Sayyid Qutb.

    Qutb's work advocated the use of jihad (struggle) against jahili (ignorant) societies, both Western and so-called Islamic ones, which he argued were in need of radical transformation.

    His writings - particularly the 1964 work Milestones - inspired the founders of many radical Islamist groups, including Islamic Jihad and al-Qaeda.

    In 1965, the government again cracked down on the Ikhwan, executing Qutb in 1966 - transforming him into a martyr for many people across the region.


    Quote
    Significant public opposition to Mr Morsi and the Ikhwan began building in November 2012.


    The headquarters of the Muslim Brotherhood was ransacked by protesters before Mr Morsi was ousted
    Wishing to ensure that the constituent assembly could finish drafting the new constitution, the president issued an interim constitutional declaration granting himself far-reaching powers. He agreed to limit the scope of the declaration after days of opposition protests, but there was further outrage at the end of that month when the constituent assembly approved a rushed version of the constitution - despite a boycott by liberals, secularists and the Coptic Church, who said it failed to protect freedom of expression and religion.

    As opposition mounted, President Morsi issued a decree authorising the armed forces to protect national institutions and polling places until a referendum on the draft constitution was held in December 2012, which critics said amounted to a form of martial law.

    The army returned to barracks after the charter was approved, but within weeks it was forced to deploy in cities along the Suez Canal to halt deadly clashes between opponents and supporters of Mr Morsi and the Ikhwan. At the end of January 2013, the military warned that the political crisis might "lead to a collapse of the state".

    In late April, opposition activists set up the grassroots Tamarod (Rebel) protest movement. It focused on collecting signatures for a petition, which complained about Mr Morsi's failure to restore security and fix the economy, and accused him of putting the Brotherhood's interests ahead of the country's as a whole. Tamarod also organised mass protests to mark the first anniversary of the day Mr Morsi took office. On 30 June 2013, millions of people took to the streets to demand his resignation.


    The Ikhwan have vowed that they will refuse to deal with Egypt's interim leaders


    When you are a Bear of Very Little Brain, and you Think of Things, you find sometimes that a Thing which seemed very Thingish inside you is quite different when it gets out into the open and has other people looking at it.


    A.A. Milne,

    "We cannot slaughter each other out of the human impasse"
  • Morsi ousted by military in Egypt
     Reply #48 - July 06, 2013, 10:01 PM

    I understand they are actually a very small, but well organised group, who got support by giving out bread and various social services, and got the vote out when needed amongst illiterate people.

    I think I saw some polls showing they are actually not at all popular.  They are very good at being noisy and getting out rentamob.


    Things are rarely ever that simple. The ikhwan are among the most ideologically influential groups in the modern Muslim world.
  • Morsi ousted by military in Egypt
     Reply #49 - July 06, 2013, 10:32 PM

    Impeachment or the expiration of their term. The country will suffer if they continue with the trend of having a revolution every two years.

    Yup, that's what bothers me about this. Not having an MB gummint is, as far as it goes, a good thing IMO. How they got from an MB gummint to a new one is rather worrying, and doesn't bode all that well. It may turn out ok, or it may turn into a total shitstorm. Too early to tell.

    Devious, treacherous, murderous, neanderthal, sub-human of the West. bunny
  • Morsi ousted by military in Egypt
     Reply #50 - July 07, 2013, 10:07 AM

    If he is guilty of violating the constitution, try him in open hearings and have him impeached. Let those reasons be clear to all. As it stands, even on this forum of intelligent and insightful people, we can't place our fingers on exactly why he was ousted...apart of course from the fact that lots of angry people protested in the streets.
    ...
    I would have preferred to let the MB fuck everything up as they inevitably would have, let the people get fed up with them and understand that, contrary to the slogan, Islam is not the solution, and let them vote the bastard out in the next free and fair elections.


    A trust in due process only works when you can rely on due process not to be made to favour incumbents. My understanding is that the new Egyptian constitution didn't provide workable machinery for the impeachment of a sitting President, and - call me cynical - I suspect this was deliberate, certainly given Morsi's moves to put himself beyond judicial oversight back in November last year. There were also attempts to change the electoral law in the MB's favour back in April (including some plain old-fashioned gerrymandering - increased numbers of MPs from MB-supporting areas, for one thing), as well as attempts to sideline the judiciary when they - ironically, with reference to the new constitution - declared against it.

    All in all, these guys didn't seem to care for separation of powers, and only cared for the rule of law insofar as it favoured them. Such an authoritarian mentality - as in the days of Mubarak - works when you can be sure of a supine (or an easily ignored) opposition, which they certainly didn't have. Where they could have been making alliances, it seems that they chose to favour themselves instead; there's a reason that the Nour party were on board with this coup.
  • Morsi ousted by military in Egypt
     Reply #51 - July 07, 2013, 01:18 PM

    well let us get some news from Land of Pyramids..

    Quote
    ElBaradei's appointment put on hold

    CAIRO — Egypt's new president has backed away from an announcement that pro-reform leader Mohamed Elbaradei would be the interim prime minister. A spokesman for interim President Adly Mansour, Ahmed el-Musilamani, told reporters on Saturday that consultations were continuing, denying that the appointment of the Nobel Peace laureate was ever certain...


    well that is a good news., I say it is good for that guy., He should NOT be the part of this transition .. Either he should go to public and get elected or stay away from such ad-hoc appointments.

    Quote
    U.S. not backing any Egyptian party or group   WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama on Saturday reiterated that the U.S. is not aligned with and is not supporting any particular Egyptian political party or group and again condemned the ongoing violence across Egypt.

    Obama made those points during a telephone conference with the National Security Council about developments in Egypt, according to a statement issued by the White House. He was spending the weekend at Camp David, the presidential retreat in Maryland.

    "The United States categorically rejects the false claims propagated by some in Egypt that we are working with specific political parties or movements to dictate how Egypt's transition should proceed," the White House statement said. "We remain committed to the Egyptian people and their aspirations for democracy, economy opportunity and dignity. But the future path of Egypt can only be determined by the Egyptian people."

    Well that is what AMRIKA says.. but people don't believe what American says..

    Quote
    Iran says overthrow of Egypt president 'improper'
      TEHRAN, Iran -- Iran's foreign ministry on Sunday voiced disapproval of the toppling of Egypt's former president by the military, calling the move "improper" in its first official reaction to last week's events.

    Official news agency IRNA quoted ministry spokesman Abbas Araghchi as also saying that supporters of Mohammed Morsi should not give up in their efforts to reinstate him. Elections and not "the streets" should not decide who is president of Egypt, he added.

    "Islamists and revolutionaries should not be frustrated," said Araghchi. "Arab Spring can be followed by warm summer and cold winter," too. While Araghchi did not call the move a "coup," senior law maker Alaeddin Boroujerdi did use the term last Thursday, echoing declarations by Morsi and his backers.

    Also on Sunday, President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad hinted that internal conflicts in Egypt would benefit Israel. "You, who are fighting each other in your country, be careful about your real enemy," he said.

    Morsi, Egypt's first democratically elected president, ended more than three decades of diplomatic estrangement with Iran that began when Egypt offered refuge to Iran's deposed shah. Ties further deteriorated after Egypt's landmark peace deal with Israel.


    Quote
    Egypt army's Mursi ouster was justified, says Blair
    LONDON: Egypt's army had no choice but to overthrow Islamist president Mohamed Mursi, former British prime minister Tony Blair said on Sunday.

    Writing in the Observer newspaper, Blair, who acts as Middle East envoy for the United States, Russia, the EU and the UN, said the army's only alternative would have been to let Egypt descend into chaos. "The events that led to the Egyptian army's removal of President Mohamed Mursi confronted the military with a simple choice: intervention or chaos," wrote Blair, who led Britain for a decade from 1997.

    The army toppled Mursi from power last Wednesday following huge protests against his rule, but dozens of people have been killed in clashes in the wake of his departure. Blair said the West had strong incentives to support Egypt's democratic transition.

    "At its crudest, we can't afford for Egypt to collapse. So we should engage with the new de facto power," he wrote.

    What is this?   Huh? Who is Blair?  It appears this Blair guy never did anything right since that 9/11 tragedy..

    Quote
    Egypt: Sudan's Islamic Movement Condemns Egypt "Coup"

    The Sudanese Islamic Movement (IM) has described the ouster of the former Egyptian president Mohamed Morsi as a "clear violation of the democratic rules". Islamic Movement's secretary general and Sudan's First Vice President Ali Osman Taha (R) talks to Egypt Islamic Leader Mohamed Badie during the 8th General Conference of Sudanese Islamic Movement in Khartoum November 15, 2012. (REUTERS/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah)

    In a statement issued yesterday, the IM expressed hope and confidence that the Egyptian army and Judiciary would restore legitimacy and abide by the globally recognized rules of democratic practice.

    According to the statement, reinstating Morsi would maintain the unity of the Egyptian people and help them avoid slipping into chaos and violence...

     That is from Islam ... I guess it would be same for those who are fighting for Islam Except from Saudi kingdom.. There they fight and give money for Wahabism.. And  thathail king ..sand kingdom  says Saudis, Gulf emirates actively aided Egypt’s military coup, settling score for Mubarak ouster    well i don't want to read the news..  But i say to ElBaradei "STAY AWAY FROM THE PRESENT EGYPTIAN POLITICS"

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Morsi ousted by military in Egypt
     Reply #52 - July 07, 2013, 02:08 PM

    A trust in due process only works when you can rely on due process not to be made to favour incumbents. My understanding is that the new Egyptian constitution didn't provide workable machinery for the impeachment of a sitting President, and - call me cynical - I suspect this was deliberate, certainly given Morsi's moves to put himself beyond judicial oversight back in November last year. There were also attempts to change the electoral law in the MB's favour back in April (including some plain old-fashioned gerrymandering - increased numbers of MPs from MB-supporting areas, for one thing), as well as attempts to sideline the judiciary when they - ironically, with reference to the new constitution - declared against it.

    All in all, these guys didn't seem to care for separation of powers, and only cared for the rule of law insofar as it favoured them. Such an authoritarian mentality - as in the days of Mubarak - works when you can be sure of a supine (or an easily ignored) opposition, which they certainly didn't have. Where they could have been making alliances, it seems that they chose to favour themselves instead; there's a reason that the Nour party were on board with this coup.


    That's the case of many third world countries; every party or a movement that evolved into a political party wants to take control of government in a dictatorial manner with no room for opposition unlike most European countries.

    "I'm standing here like an asshole holding my Charles Dickens"

    "No theory,No ready made system,no book that has ever been written to save the world. i cleave to no system.."-Bakunin
  • Morsi ousted by military in Egypt
     Reply #53 - July 07, 2013, 02:11 PM

    Quote
    Well that is what AMRIKA says.. but people don't believe what American says..


    Of course, Amrika are evulz,nothing good comes from them. Lol

    "I'm standing here like an asshole holding my Charles Dickens"

    "No theory,No ready made system,no book that has ever been written to save the world. i cleave to no system.."-Bakunin
  • Morsi ousted by military in Egypt
     Reply #54 - July 07, 2013, 03:02 PM

    Of course, Amrika are evulz, nothing good comes from them. Lol

    well that is true., nothing good comes out of them for other countries.. but i don't care about  AMRIKA., Americans are rich buggers with huge resources in brain as well as in that Red Indian Natural Maize..

    But look at these Rascals Kato ..
    Quote
    Syria rebels say Egypt coup shows why democracy doesn’t work

    Syria’s Islamist rebels say the downfall of Egypt’s popularly elected Muslim Brotherhood president has proven that Western nations pushing for democracy will never accept them, and reinforced the view of radicals that a violent power grab is their only resort.

    Radical Islamist groups, some of them linked to al Qaeda, have lately been in the ascendancy in Syria’s two-year conflict as the death toll rises above 100,000.  Assad has celebrated President Mohamed Mursi’s fall as a symbolic blow to the Islamist-dominated opposition, though on the battlefield, where his troops are already making gains, it is likely to have little impact given the Brotherhood’s limited role in the fighting.

    Hardliners in the rebel ranks have long overshadowed the Muslim Brotherhood, a regional movement with a more moderate Islamist brand, and often criticized it for working within the framework of democracy instead of demanding an Islamic state.

    Quote
    “(We) always knew that our rights can only be regained by force and that is why we have chosen the ammunition box instead of the ballot box,” said a statement by the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria, the local franchise of al Qaeda’s international network, published on the day Mursi fell.

    Assad’s father and predecessor put down an uprising by Syria’s Muslim Brotherhood in the 1980s, killing thousands and levelling parts of the city of Hama in its suppression of the group’s violent uprising there.....  

    ..

    Look at that it appears every one is happy in Syria .. Assad is happy with his silver spoon since his dad days and the Islamic heroes are happy with killing those who don't know what to do in syria..

    Read all that from that link.. sounds like some one from OJ SIMPSON defending team wrote  that gibberish to me..  That guy is thoroughly confused

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Morsi ousted by military in Egypt
     Reply #55 - July 07, 2013, 03:55 PM

    Does anyone know what the length of the presidential term was?
  • Morsi ousted by military in Egypt
     Reply #56 - July 07, 2013, 04:13 PM

    Does anyone know what the length of the presidential term was?


    List of political term limits in different countries

    Same as AMRIKA   Two four-year terms, starting from the 2012 presidential election

    Although I write against Morsi and His silly Islam but that guy is  million times better than the fellow land of pure elected couple of months back ....TOTAL FRAUD.... foolish people look at that watch.. it costs.. ~ 4 million dollars.. in Pakistan's currency it is .4 BILLION.. fucking shit  ..

    So the question is WHAT ARE MORSI's Mistakes??  And who is behind this?

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Morsi ousted by military in Egypt
     Reply #57 - July 07, 2013, 04:42 PM

    So the question is WHAT ARE MORSI's Mistakes??  And who is behind this?  

    One of the problem I see in Egypt is Egyptian elections itself.  I blame people of Egypt who did not participate in elections. In 2012  Egyptian election commission was fairly independent and elections were not rigged but here is the problem..

    Total valid votes         25,577,511    96.81%
    Invalid votes        843,252    3.19%
    Turnout        26,420,763    51.85%
    Abstentions      24,538,031    48.15%
    Registered voters    50,958,794    

    Almost 50% of people didn't even go for voting..  but I bet many of them participated in the recent strike against Morsi..   that is the first problem with elections.

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Morsi ousted by military in Egypt
     Reply #58 - July 07, 2013, 05:09 PM

    Yeez quoting himself Cheesy

    Bit off topic but im not really a fan of two four-year terms, a single six or seven-year term would be enough for any muthafucka that wants to serve as a president At least that will save a lot of money on campaign and less distraction.


    "I'm standing here like an asshole holding my Charles Dickens"

    "No theory,No ready made system,no book that has ever been written to save the world. i cleave to no system.."-Bakunin
  • Morsi ousted by military in Egypt
     Reply #59 - July 07, 2013, 05:22 PM

    Yeez quoting himself Cheesy


    Kato  Kaelin  Now I am mad  finmad Go grow BEARD  and put a HAT on the head and cry on a wall  finmad

    So What did Morsi do wrong  Cato?  you tell me...

    Quote
    All the pro-Morsi people I have met have all asked me the same question, what did Morsi do? Then they ask you, don’t you know the amount of pressure the man has to work under? And some of them would pass questioning and go straight to making statements like “you only hate him because he is a good Muslim” or “all of this is because the west does not want Islam to prevail.”

    Well, this is an honest and objective attempt to list the reasons why I believe, and many others like me do, that Morsi has done more harm than good. This has nothing to do with the man being a good Muslim or a member of the Muslim Brotherhood. Morsi was in a position to implement much needed change; yet, he instead issued a series of strange decisions that made his presidency closer to an experimental one. This is an objective account of the decisions Morsi took and the negative consequences those decisions had.

    Morsi officially took office on 24 June 2012. A few days later, on 8 July, Morsi made his first decision, cancelling the Constitutional Court’s ruling to dissolve parliament, and calling parliament back based on his presidential decree. Two days later, Morsi changed his mind and decided not to challenge the court, backing down from reconvening parliament after the court dissolved it again. The very first decree Morsi made was one intended to overturn a court’s ruling. From the beginning of his term, Morsi has shown clear signs of vulgar abuse of power.

    A few months later, Morsi started this unconstitutional power-hungry raid on the judiciary. The issue of the public prosecutor, whom Morsi decided to relieve from duty and appoint as an ambassador to Vatican City, marked the beginning of a new phase in Morsi’s rule. It was not necessarily the beginning of an authoritarian regime under the banner of the brotherhood (that will come later), but it was certainly the beginning of a clear diversion from any plausibly democratic path, especially the one promised by Morsi in his presidential campaign.

    Shortly after this decision was made, Morsi surprised us all in November with a new constitutional declaration; one which was an obvious attempt to make sure Muslim Brotherhood core interests would be served. In this declaration, Morsi made his decisions immune from judicial review, appointed a new public prosecutor and made the Shura Council and the Constitutional Assembly immune as well. This phase indeed marked the beginning of the disclosure of the Muslim Brotherhood’s expansive plans.

    Unfortunately, space constraints will not enable me to list all the decisions made over the past year. However, what is mentioned above is not an opinion or a conspiracy theory; it is simply an incomplete recount of Morsi’s performance.

    I would oppose any president who diverts this country away from democracy as much as Morsi has. He is not a symbol of Islam or an example of virtue or a watchful guardian over Egyptian interests. Opposing him is not opposing Islam, neither is it an attempt to spread immorality. Those who dreamed of democracy and who took to the streets in search of dignity, freedom and social justice must oppose Morsi for failing to deliver these things

    Maybe what we need is a moment of objective thinking before we allow fanaticism to take over.


    That is from  Ziad Akl, senior analyst at Al Ahram Center for Political and Strategic Studies.

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
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