Skip navigation
Sidebar -

Advanced search options →

Welcome

Welcome to CEMB forum.
Please login or register. Did you miss your activation email?

Donations

Help keep the Forum going!
Click on Kitty to donate:

Kitty is lost

Recent Posts


Qur'anic studies today
Today at 04:36 PM

NayaPakistan...New Pakist...
Today at 04:11 PM

Are Hijabs really a choic...
Today at 02:35 PM

Kashmir endgame
Today at 02:13 PM

Iran uprising - is the en...
by zeca
Today at 02:06 PM

Excellence and uniqueness
Today at 01:45 PM

New PM incoming
by zeca
Today at 11:41 AM

Lebanon protests
by zeca
Today at 12:47 AM

Random Islamic History Po...
Yesterday at 06:24 PM

Anti-imperialism and the ...
Yesterday at 06:20 PM

Book burning in Norway
December 09, 2019, 07:49 PM

مدهش----- لماذا؟؟؟؟
December 09, 2019, 04:12 PM

Theme Changer

 Topic: Hijaabis.

 (Read 68230 times)
  • Previous page 1 2 3 45 6 7 Next page « Previous thread | Next thread »
  • Hijaabis.
     Reply #90 - March 06, 2013, 08:14 PM

    ^^^I think it's the new forum layout.
  • Hijaabis.
     Reply #91 - March 06, 2013, 08:17 PM

    It's nothing new. It's generally assumed that you are replying to the last post if the context makes sense and you haven't quoted something else, so there's really no need to quote it. Some people use a caret (^) to specify they are replying to the last post.

    If you really need to quote the last post, you can hit the "Reply" button and then you'll be able to quote it.

    I hear the rains, I see the fire, I feel the flame. It doesn't change the faces I want to blame for the shame I'm feeling.
    But the winds of change will blow again. And we're the lucky ones who travel on towards the sun.

    Can you hear it calling you?
  • Hijaabis.
     Reply #92 - March 10, 2013, 10:53 PM

    I'm not covered but most of my cousins one by one are covering their hair. My mother looks at me right now like  finmad

    oops  Tongue

    "In every religion there is love, yet love has no religion"

    "The intellectual runs away, afraid of drowning; the whole business of love is to drown in the sea." - Rumi
  • Hijaabis.
     Reply #93 - March 10, 2013, 11:01 PM

    Seems to be the trend.

    20 years ago no one in my family or extended family (as far as I can remember) covered up. Now several women wear the hijab, my crazy aunty is a niqabi, and my mum keeps fantasising on about how she'll start wearing the abaya while also convincing my sisters.

  • Hijaabis.
     Reply #94 - March 12, 2013, 03:31 AM

    Even back when I was a muslim I couldn't understand how any self respecting man could marry a woman in a niqab.

    What they are essentially doing is saying

    " I will marry this woman without even seeing what she looks like let alone talking to her and I'm happy letting mum decide if her looks and personality are a good fit for me"

    Makes me wanna tell those hardcore muslim guys

     " OK Turn in your man card now"


    They are allowed to see her face to see if it's m3abool (agreeable) or not.
    And they can talk.... supervised. Tongue
    (Honestly, I'm amazed any of these marriages last over a month)

    Rather be forgotten than remembered for giving in.
  • Hijaabis.
     Reply #95 - March 12, 2013, 04:00 AM

    I'm sure, or wishful thinking. That hijabs are a trending thing that's going to phase out once the whole us vs. them mentality dies out. Apparently decades ago in many countries women could be Muslim and not be pressured to wear a hijab. But now thanks to media and the "Islamic Revival" the hijab seems to be a sort of symbol that asserts Islamic presence in an area. It's been almost like a , you need to wear a hijab or your not Muslim enough :X

    ***~Church is where bad people go to hide~***
  • Hijaabis.
     Reply #96 - June 21, 2013, 07:09 AM

    I feel for any women forced to cover its degrading to be forced. Anyhow i wear hijab and cover my body with jilbaab. I guess ive worn it for so long its become a part of me. I hate people thinking im muslim but same time i like to cover up and be modest. Hiwever if i did take off jilbaab God knows whag i would wear i love the laziness of jilbaab. I was never into fashion or spending on clothes all the tim
    e. Im not forced to wear jilbaab only hijab i know hopefully i will stop wearing this coz i dont want to be seen as muslim but for now i happy spending time exploring my options as to what im gunnna wear.
    e
  • Hijaabis.
     Reply #97 - June 21, 2013, 07:12 AM

    I think men get off sexsually on this whole niqab thing. Ots like a whole new level of porn for them. Unwrapping the forbidden. Most niqabies i know just use niqab as a way to flirt and attract attention from guys. I think guys love that subbmissive and vunerable come and get me look.
  • Hijaabis.
     Reply #98 - June 22, 2013, 04:13 AM

    ^ Lol, it's a whole industry. "Arab porn" where the only thing the "pious" submissive would be wearing is the niqqab on her face. Her family must be very proud of her submission and devotion....

    Just like Johnny Flynn said, the breath I've taken and the one I must to go on.
  • Hijaabis.
     Reply #99 - August 05, 2013, 10:56 PM

    I've had to a wear a hijab since I was 9 or 10,
    I hated it, it was uncomfortable and annoying.
    It affected my self esteem and confidence.

    I can't stand the hijab, everytime I leave the house I have to wear it.
    I just keep telling myself; one more year and I'll be free.

    Has anyone here managed to move away from home, ( for uni)  and then taken off their hijab (at uni)?
    If so what did it feel like?
    Do you still occasionally wear the hijab? (E.g. When visiting family)
    How did your friends/family react to it? (If you did tell them)
  • Hijaabis.
     Reply #100 - August 06, 2013, 12:41 AM

    I'm a closet atheist and I've been forced to wear a hijab when I started kindergarten, in spite how my mother was against the idea. I'm 19 and I still wear it until this day. I've always despised wearing a hijab. Occasionally, I do cry when I put one on during the morning lol. What bothers me is the racial attacks and harassment I experience. I get judged easily which hurts the most because no one knows that I'm an atheist and no different to any other Canadian. I do know hijabi girls who would secretly not wear a hijab when they're out because of the fear of harassment or they're just not interested in wearing a hijab. Most wouldn't wear one if they're living away from home.

    turnipovich
  • Hijaabis.
     Reply #101 - August 06, 2013, 02:19 AM

    Hey Mia I'm sorry to hear how you're treated, I thought in general Canadian mentality was more evolved than that.

    `But I don't want to go among mad people,' Alice remarked.
     `Oh, you can't help that,' said the Cat: `we're all mad here. I'm mad.  You're mad.'
     `How do you know I'm mad?' said Alice.
     `You must be,' said the Cat, `or you wouldn't have come here.'
  • Hijaabis.
     Reply #102 - August 06, 2013, 04:58 AM

    I live in London, Ontario, Canada and there isn't much religious and racial minorities in my city, especially Muslims. After 9/11, there have been some racial harassment in my area, especially once there was a sudden rise of extremists in London, Ontario. It started off with two stupid teens (http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/story/2013/04/02/london-ontario-mosque-reaction.html) and that created a fear amongst non-Muslims in London. I'm not saying London is a racist city but there are a few non-Muslims (neo-Nazis, anti-Arabs) who tends to scare the Muslim community. Canada is a very open-minded country; a few racists like most other countries but it's a good country lol

    turnipovich
  • Hijaabis.
     Reply #103 - August 06, 2013, 05:16 AM

    Yeeeeeeeeeeah, look at the history of the world and tell me religion doesn't breed terrorism. I'm not saying it can't be a force for good, just that it more often isn't in the grand scheme of things.

    `But I don't want to go among mad people,' Alice remarked.
     `Oh, you can't help that,' said the Cat: `we're all mad here. I'm mad.  You're mad.'
     `How do you know I'm mad?' said Alice.
     `You must be,' said the Cat, `or you wouldn't have come here.'
  • Hijaabis.
     Reply #104 - August 07, 2013, 12:27 AM

    Exactly, I agree with you. I'm 100% against religion. Whether it causes good or bad, it's not necessary and it's in the way of life.

    turnipovich
  • Hijaabis.
     Reply #105 - December 18, 2013, 04:57 PM

    I'm not quite an ex-muslim yet but I still wear hijabs.  I know my parents would go absolutely mad if I tried to stop wearing hijab.  It does make me angry and upset sometimes when I look in the mirror.  Not just the hijab but all the other dull clothes I wear, there's nothing in my wardrobe that's nice and pretty.  But I try to stop thinking about it and I usually just put it on automatically without thinking.
  • Hijaabis.
     Reply #106 - December 18, 2013, 06:46 PM

    Exactly, I agree with you. I'm 100% against religion. Whether it causes good or bad, it's not necessary and it's in the way of life.


    This view sits very uncomfortably with me.

    No free mixing of the sexes is permitted on these forums or via PM or the various chat groups that are operating.

    Women must write modestly and all men must lower their case.

    http://www.ummah.com/forum/showthread.php?425649-Have-some-Hayaa-%28modesty-shame%29-people!
  • Hijaabis.
     Reply #107 - December 18, 2013, 08:00 PM

    This view sits very uncomfartable with me.


    As a born and bred atheist, I'm totally with you there. No need to go all out atheist salafi-style. Many people have a spiritual side. It is part of being a human being.

    If people are nice and aren't trying to stomp their beliefs down my or other people's throat, I'll sit down, chat and buy them a beer. Hell, I would probably even be hanging around and drink THEIR beer as well. I have never figured out what it is with chicks and scarves and beers, anyway. Very confusing.

    Danish Never-Moose adopted by the kind people on the CEMB-forum
    Ex-Muslim chat (Unaffliated with CEMB). Safari users: Use "#ex-muslims" as the channel name. CEMB chat thread.
  • Hijaabis.
     Reply #108 - December 18, 2013, 08:15 PM

    Yup, I do, I'm not sure if I label myself as a ex muslim as of yet, it still scares me to say it out loud, like God will smite me or something lol. I wear it still for the majority of the time unless I have panic attack mode and I just rip it off and get a big mac. I feel ugly and frumpy, I never used to, it pisses me off, I feel ugly but I feel bad to dress it up, it looks stupid to be all skinny jeaned and face full of make with hijab, its just pointless and ridiculous. I  don't wear abaya's anymore because I don't want ppl to think or expect me to be more religious, but I look like a tramp and a half, I don't even take time to wrap my scarf decently, just fling it on, fling on baggy uncoordinated shit. My self confidence is through the floor, i'm insecure, and I get depressed at the thought of dressing up aswell, like I don't know how to look decent anymore, or I can't be bothered, I don't know. I feel like i'm wasting my youthful beauty years haha, but I seem to like to punish myself so its here, on my head.

    "Make anyone believe their own knowledge and logic is insufficient and you'll have a puppet susceptible to manipulation."
  • Hijaabis.
     Reply #109 - December 18, 2013, 08:25 PM

    Feeling is one thing, being controlled by it is another. Work through it. You'll get there.

    `But I don't want to go among mad people,' Alice remarked.
     `Oh, you can't help that,' said the Cat: `we're all mad here. I'm mad.  You're mad.'
     `How do you know I'm mad?' said Alice.
     `You must be,' said the Cat, `or you wouldn't have come here.'
  • Hijaabis.
     Reply #110 - December 18, 2013, 08:50 PM

    As a born and bred atheist, I'm totally with you there. No need to go all out atheist salafi-style. Many people have a spiritual side. It is part of being a human being.

    If people are nice and aren't trying to stomp their beliefs down my or other people's throat, I'll sit down, chat and buy them a beer. Hell, I would probably even be hanging around and drink THEIR beer as well. I have never figured out what it is with chicks and scarves and beers, anyway. Very confusing.


    Yes I know.

    To be fair to Mia she never suggested imposing views on anyone so I don't want to appear to be attacking heras I know somepeople may read other things into a statement.

    But, religion is an ideology. Anyone can have whatever ideology they wish. No thought police please. But it's when people act on those ideologies that it becomes a problem. Same with religion, politics, hobbies or any other form of social interaction that invovles an individual exerting some degree of power/control over the other.

    No free mixing of the sexes is permitted on these forums or via PM or the various chat groups that are operating.

    Women must write modestly and all men must lower their case.

    http://www.ummah.com/forum/showthread.php?425649-Have-some-Hayaa-%28modesty-shame%29-people!
  • Hijaabis.
     Reply #111 - December 18, 2013, 10:32 PM

    I started wearing hijab when I was 7 or 8 - long before I could understand myself or my body enough to know the person I was going to be. Growing up with it,  it was very convenient. I didn't have to give much thought to what I was wearing. I could just throw on a hijab and put on an abaya (lol, still do). I didn't care about messing around with my hair. Getting dressed and out the door was very easy.

    Also didn't care too much about how people viewed me because I was very disconnected from the un-Islamic world. My friends were all Muslims. My friends all wore hijab. So it didn't make me feel weird or anything.

    It was when I graduated high school and left for college that the hijab started to become a bit of an issue. Where I had once thought it protected me from those who would judge me for wearing it, it now kept me separated from everyone else. When I went to college, I was ready to break out of the Islamic world and make friends who weren't Muslims, which I eventually did, but the hijab didn't help. I suddenly felt like it was smothering me. I felt antsy in public, like I was somewhere that I wasn't supposed to be. Whenever I took the city bus to school, I felt painfully visible and invisible at the same time. People would notice me and then ignore me. For lack of a better word, I felt like an alien every time I left my house, like I didn't belong even though I've lived in the same area for most of my life.

    I can't wait until I take it off so I can finally feel comfortable in my own skin again.

    "so now, if you leave (Allahu A?lam is you already have) what will u do??? go out and show ur body to all the men??? sleep with countless men?? maashaAllah if you think think this is freedom or womens right then may Allah guide you to that which is correct."
  • Hijaabis.
     Reply #112 - December 19, 2013, 08:04 AM

    How does that Nike strap line go?

    When you are a Bear of Very Little Brain, and you Think of Things, you find sometimes that a Thing which seemed very Thingish inside you is quite different when it gets out into the open and has other people looking at it.


    A.A. Milne,

    "We cannot slaughter each other out of the human impasse"
  • Hijaabis.
     Reply #113 - December 19, 2013, 08:06 AM

    Just Jew it?

    No free mixing of the sexes is permitted on these forums or via PM or the various chat groups that are operating.

    Women must write modestly and all men must lower their case.

    http://www.ummah.com/forum/showthread.php?425649-Have-some-Hayaa-%28modesty-shame%29-people!
  • Hijaabis.
     Reply #114 - December 19, 2013, 09:43 AM

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=doZ6wOJHu_E
  • Hijaabis.
     Reply #115 - December 19, 2013, 12:39 PM

    As a born and bred atheist, I'm totally with you there. No need to go all out atheist salafi-style.

    Even so, at its worst, atheism is a strongly stated opinion on the internet or a dinner table rant. It'd be fantastic if we could say the same about religion at its worst.

    Too fucking busy, and vice versa.
  • Hijaabis.
     Reply #116 - March 27, 2014, 02:00 PM

    https://fbcdn-sphotos-d-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-prn1/t1.0-9/994633_440451712725409_1915361510_n.jpg

    I absolutely HATE this picture

    "I Knew who I was this morning, but I've changed a few times since then." Alice in wonderland

    "This is the only heaven we have how dare you make it a hell" Dr Marlene Winell
  • Hijaabis.
     Reply #117 - March 27, 2014, 02:07 PM

    ^Hahaha. Well at least she's dressed for the occasion, sure looks hot down there. (or up there?)
  • Hijaabis.
     Reply #118 - March 27, 2014, 02:08 PM

    lol psychos

    "I Knew who I was this morning, but I've changed a few times since then." Alice in wonderland

    "This is the only heaven we have how dare you make it a hell" Dr Marlene Winell
  • Hijaabis.
     Reply #119 - March 27, 2014, 02:47 PM



    Oh I got that pic from my ex-bf as a nice warning for afterlife. But he is the kind of guy who prefers a sexily dressed female receptionist for his for his business. Then I asked him why he wants his wife to be different? The male chauvinist answered, "Because she is MY wife. I don't want her to go to hell!" Idiot!
  • Previous page 1 2 3 45 6 7 Next page « Previous thread | Next thread »