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 Topic: Hijaabis.

 (Read 65887 times)
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  • Hijaabis.
     Reply #30 - February 02, 2013, 05:48 AM

    Cheesy It's the feeling of finally having the freedom that makes it, os.

    Fucked, it really was so wonderful and such a rush and a relief at once. I can't wait for you to experience it too! I hope you don't have to wait too long.

    I hear the rains, I see the fire, I feel the flame. It doesn't change the faces I want to blame for the shame I'm feeling.
    But the winds of change will blow again. And we're the lucky ones who travel on towards the sun.

    Can you hear it calling you?
  • Hijaabis.
     Reply #31 - February 02, 2013, 05:53 AM

    Fair nuff.

    Devious, treacherous, murderous, neanderthal, sub-human of the West. bunny
  • Hijaabis.
     Reply #32 - February 02, 2013, 05:55 AM

    thank you... i hope soon too Smiley

    Il faut savoir grandir et aller de l'avant.
  • Hijaabis.
     Reply #33 - February 02, 2013, 07:01 AM

    I can echo those here who say they wouldn't want to wear any form of hijab, no matter how mild, because of how it blatantly associates the wearer with Islam. As I was working through my doubts before actually leaving Islam, this was one of the things I struggled with. Having been living in an Islamic country at the time, though, I couldn't have removed it without making serious waves at work and within my social circle.

    I was still living there when I finally did leave Islam. At that point, I didn't dare remove it. I feared it would have meant not only losing my social circle, but risking my freedom and possibly my life if it led to the people around me discovering the truth about my apostasy. And so I continued to wear it for the longest four months of my life until I was able to leave the country.

    A few weeks before I was to leave, I was contemplating how and when, if ever, I would tell my closest Muslim friends that I could no longer believe. I decided I could do a test run to see how they would react by admitting that I had thoughts of removing the hijab. Just as I suspected, they reacted with pretty much an intervention, and begged me to reconsider. One friend hastily forwarded a few links about hijab in an attempt to convince me it was obligatory. In her haste, she didn't realize one of the links she sent me actually argued against the necessity of hijab. When I pointed it out, she frantically apologized, and proceeded to fling quote after quote from Qur'an, hadith, and various scholars in an attempt to prove that hijab is required, and then bullied me into obeying with statements like, "Please remember, that any hadith is sunnah.  And we must follow the sunnah also."

    With just days left in the country, I assured them they had convinced me and I would keep the hijab. They seemed satisfied.

    On the day I finally left, I was wearing a long skirt and a thin t-shirt under a flowing black abaya with a black hijab wrapped lightly but securely around my head. I boarded the plane and sat quietly, anxiously yet nervously awaiting my stop in Amsterdam. I felt fine in my abaya and hijab. I knew by then how to wear them comfortably, so I wasn't physically bothered. But I was acutely aware of everyone who looked at me. "I'm on the plane now, I'm home free. I don't have to wear this anymore. Can they tell? Do they see the real me under these shrouds?" Because I could feel it sharply.

    As soon as I arrived in Amsterdam, I headed straight for the restroom. My palms were sweaty and my heart was racing in anticipation of what I was about to do. I was a little shaky standing in the stall as I removed each piece one at a time, folding carefully so they would take up the least amount of room in my bag. I put on the jeans and tank top I had carried with me, and then I hesitated. This was it. The end of the old me.

    I was about to have full possession of my freedom.

    Even more acutely aware of every glance, I stepped out of the restroom. I had gone in quiet, somber, and shrouded. I came out tall, fresh, alive. Had anyone noticed? It didn't matter. The air on my skin gave me goosebumps to the core and I gained confidence with every step. Before I knew it, the hijab was behind me. And I haven't looked back.


    Wow.

     clap

    how fuck works without shit??


    Let's Play Chess!

    harakaat, friend, RIP
  • Hijaabis.
     Reply #34 - February 02, 2013, 07:41 AM

    Luthiel, that was beautiful. Thanks for sharing.
  • Hijaabis.
     Reply #35 - February 02, 2013, 08:19 AM

    My point with posting that video (which is bringing a lot of people here to this thread from our twitter account) is to show an example of how shaming is one big way that hijab is enforced upon girls. And that shaming is based on threats of hell and allah. Nonmuslims are often very ignorant of this fact.


    Like thousands of angel cursing her if she let one single strand of hair out Roll Eyes

    "I'm standing here like an asshole holding my Charles Dickens"

    "No theory,No ready made system,no book that has ever been written to save the world. i cleave to no system.."-Bakunin
  • Hijaabis.
     Reply #36 - February 02, 2013, 09:21 AM

    Shadow I'm on the same boat. My parents don't even care about the hijab itself, but more about their reputation and what others say. My only option is either to hurt them really badly or move away, and I've already chosen the latter. Our community is so cruel. Whenever a family has an issue with their kids, the rest of us stop talking to them, visiting them and they aren't invited back into the community, unless they openly state that they threw out their kids.

    One particular family, they were very "famous" in the community, and their eldest daughter found a bf at uni. The dad tried marrying the two other daughters off before they had any opportunity to do the same, and the sisters ran away together. It's been like 6 years, and the family was "destroyed" so they moved back to Iraq, and their daughters live somewhere in Australia and no one knows where. I wish I could contact them somehow..

    Crunchy Cd's (can I call you CC? Tongue)

    Check out the Islamic version of slut shaming: (Clicky for piccy!)
    It's not enough that you cover from head to toe and make the effort to cover your hair; you get hated on for everything. These pics keep going around on FB, shared, liked, and there's hardly anyone to challenge it.

    Al-Alethia, I envy you so much. Congrats on the hijab-less life, can't wait to get there too.


     So, it's more about your family's honour than Islam? It's usually something else then Islam that forces you to do religious things. They just say it's Islam but it doesn't come first (not always). Do you know when and how you want to take off your hijaab? Sorry if you already mentioned it. I try to come on this website on my phone as much as possible. Can't you find them on Facebook? It would be great if you could find a way to contact them. They're so judgemental on FB. They're just as "Haram" as the girls they judge.

    I have my own soul. My own spark of divine fire.
  • Hijaabis.
     Reply #37 - February 02, 2013, 09:29 AM

    I used to wear the hijab. Dunno if I'm exactly an ex-Muslim but at the time I thought I was. It only started bothering me when I realised that people actually define themselves and others by their headscarf, and I didn't like being defined as pious or Muslim-y or whatever when I wasn't. It's hypocritical.

    It's a very, very difficult topic to broach with one's parents. What's your family like? How long have you been wearing it, when did you start, and why?

     Still stuck between wanting to be a Muslim but not feeling like a Muslim? Or...? I was 15/16. I thought it was something I had to do. I was the only one who didn't wear it yet. I wanted to take it off after 14 months or so, but they didn't let me. It was stupid of me to wear it, but they would let me wear it sooner or later. So I don't know if it would've made any difference.

    I have my own soul. My own spark of divine fire.
  • Hijaabis.
     Reply #38 - February 02, 2013, 09:37 AM

    Don't worry. I've got everything covered - literally. I'm keeping as much as I can a low profile to my parents. They don't suspect a thing from me and I try to be as quiet as I can about it. Because talking about the hijab/religion or anything else will just angered them. So it's just better if I'm just a human walking around the house without a word to say. They're happier like that and I'm somehow happier like that too. Because the quiet I am, the more I am getting independent and prepared for what's coming soon. So yeah, I don't think you should joke about it. :/ Just be on your own, in your corner. Don't talk about it to any of your family members....

     I don't mention it anymore. Ok, that's good. Plan everything very precisely before you take any actions.

    I have my own soul. My own spark of divine fire.
  • Hijaabis.
     Reply #39 - February 02, 2013, 09:42 AM

    I can echo those here who say they wouldn't want to wear any form of hijab, no matter how mild, because of how it blatantly associates the wearer with Islam. As I was working through my doubts before actually leaving Islam, this was one of the things I struggled with. Having been living in an Islamic country at the time, though, I couldn't have removed it without making serious waves at work and within my social circle.

    I was still living there when I finally did leave Islam. At that point, I didn't dare remove it. I feared it would have meant not only losing my social circle, but risking my freedom and possibly my life if it led to the people around me discovering the truth about my apostasy. And so I continued to wear it for the longest four months of my life until I was able to leave the country.

    A few weeks before I was to leave, I was contemplating how and when, if ever, I would tell my closest Muslim friends that I could no longer believe. I decided I could do a test run to see how they would react by admitting that I had thoughts of removing the hijab. Just as I suspected, they reacted with pretty much an intervention, and begged me to reconsider. One friend hastily forwarded a few links about hijab in an attempt to convince me it was obligatory. In her haste, she didn't realize one of the links she sent me actually argued against the necessity of hijab. When I pointed it out, she frantically apologized, and proceeded to fling quote after quote from Qur'an, hadith, and various scholars in an attempt to prove that hijab is required, and then bullied me into obeying with statements like, "Please remember, that any hadith is sunnah.  And we must follow the sunnah also."

    With just days left in the country, I assured them they had convinced me and I would keep the hijab. They seemed satisfied.

    On the day I finally left, I was wearing a long skirt and a thin t-shirt under a flowing black abaya with a black hijab wrapped lightly but securely around my head. I boarded the plane and sat quietly, anxiously yet nervously awaiting my stop in Amsterdam. I felt fine in my abaya and hijab. I knew by then how to wear them comfortably, so I wasn't physically bothered. But I was acutely aware of everyone who looked at me. "I'm on the plane now, I'm home free. I don't have to wear this anymore. Can they tell? Do they see the real me under these shrouds?" Because I could feel it sharply.

    As soon as I arrived in Amsterdam, I headed straight for the restroom. My palms were sweaty and my heart was racing in anticipation of what I was about to do. I was a little shaky standing in the stall as I removed each piece one at a time, folding carefully so they would take up the least amount of room in my bag. I put on the jeans and tank top I had carried with me, and then I hesitated. This was it. The end of the old me.

    I was about to have full possession of my freedom.

    Even more acutely aware of every glance, I stepped out of the restroom. I had gone in quiet, somber, and shrouded. I came out tall, fresh, alive. Had anyone noticed? It didn't matter. The air on my skin gave me goosebumps to the core and I gained confidence with every step. Before I knew it, the hijab was behind me. And I haven't looked back.

     They say Amsterdam is s city for sin and freedom. But only for those who don't come from here. Thank you for sharing your story. You must have had a lot of courage to do it.

    I have my own soul. My own spark of divine fire.
  • Hijaabis.
     Reply #40 - February 02, 2013, 10:21 AM

    I used to wear it, I still do when I go to some people but I moved out of town when I finished my degree and took the hijab off there haha! I know it is difficult to get out if the hijab, my social network profiles still have pictures of me in hijab because I am still not brave enough for the comments  wacko
  • Hijaabis.
     Reply #41 - February 02, 2013, 06:32 PM

    They say Amsterdam is s city for sin and freedom. But only for those who don't come from here. Thank you for sharing your story. You must have had a lot of courage to do it.

    Thank you Shadow. My layover happened to be in Amsterdam so that's where it happened. I suppose I could have waited until I got back to the states to take everything off. But I couldn't, really. And it didn't end there. My passport still showed me in hijab, so I had some snags getting through security and customs on the rest of the way. But maybe a non-hijabi with hijab in her passport is less suspicious than a hijabi with no hijab in her passport?

    I hear the rains, I see the fire, I feel the flame. It doesn't change the faces I want to blame for the shame I'm feeling.
    But the winds of change will blow again. And we're the lucky ones who travel on towards the sun.

    Can you hear it calling you?
  • Hijaabis.
     Reply #42 - February 02, 2013, 07:41 PM

    ^I'm a non-hijabi with a hijab on in my passport photo and I haven't encountered any particular difficulties whilst travelling. 
  • Hijaabis.
     Reply #43 - February 02, 2013, 08:38 PM

    Wonderful African Muslim on the radio this afternoon saying how the terrorists in Mali are not Muslim, with their banning music and forcing women to wear hijab.  She was wonderful about African males being deeply insulted that they could not control themselves if women were not covered!

    And seriously, please ask what grandmas, mums, aunts and others wore in the 1970's.  I think you will find there is a huge amount of hypocrisy going on!

    Quote
    The short skirt was not really worn by many women until 1966 [when Mary Quant introduced short mini dresses and skirts that were set 6 or 7 inches above the knee] and not nationwide until 1967. The mini skirts reached their hayday in the year 1970. At that time,they were worn worldwide by the vast majority of women ,even in many Islamic, Arab, and Middle Eastern countries.In the Middle East ,women wore mini skirts as their daily apparel. From Kabul in Afghanistan to Iran and Bahrain in the Persian Gulf,Egypt,the Levant,North Africa,etc, mini skirts were the trend and it was generally acceptable for many women to wear them, even in the most religious and conservative families and societies.Among women who wore the mini skirts,were most school and university students , teachers and university staff members ,house wives,working classes,employees in governmental institutions,doctors and nurses in hospitals ,etc.This might be surprising to newer generations who never expected mini skirts to have been, at one point in time [1966-1975], so common in the Middle East.Many of younger generations were really astonished,when I happened to show them old photos of their grandmothers,aunts and other older relatives [above 50 ] wearing mini skirts through out their youth .The quick decline of the mini skirt in the middle East began from late 1975,and was virtually non existent by 1977


    http://www.ikbis.com/shots/78949

    When you are a Bear of Very Little Brain, and you Think of Things, you find sometimes that a Thing which seemed very Thingish inside you is quite different when it gets out into the open and has other people looking at it.


    A.A. Milne,

    "We cannot slaughter each other out of the human impasse"
  • Hijaabis.
     Reply #44 - February 02, 2013, 09:02 PM

    I actually managed to watch that entire video rant. So much BS, I don't even know where to begin. She's wearing make-up, yet still banging on about how hijabis don't care about how they look and aren't obsessed with looking good. I'm a non-hijabi and if her make-up is anything to go by, she cares a lot more about her appearance than I do about mine. 

    Towards the end, she said something about girls who cover feeling beautiful and girls who don't, feel like they have to expose themselves to be attractive Roll Eyes So typical. I never felt beautiful in the hijab, ever. I felt like it sucked the life out of me, made me feel uncomfortable in my own skin, socially awkward and sometimes just downright ugly. I don't feel beautiful now either, but I feel like a weight has been lifted off my shoulders and I'm able to express myself and be who I am. I feel like an individual and not a slave to an archaic and primitive ideology that hates me for being born "less intelligent and deficient in religion". 
  • Hijaabis.
     Reply #45 - February 02, 2013, 09:04 PM

    The feeling of wind blowing through your hair is amazing and something I always used to fantasise about when I was hijabed. It's refreshing and liberating. Hijab truly is a cage.
  • Hijaabis.
     Reply #46 - February 02, 2013, 09:11 PM

    I can echo those here who say they wouldn't want to wear any form of hijab, no matter how mild, because of how it blatantly associates the wearer with Islam. As I was working through my doubts before actually leaving Islam, this was one of the things I struggled with. Having been living in an Islamic country at the time, though, I couldn't have removed it without making serious waves at work and within my social circle.

    I was still living there when I finally did leave Islam. At that point, I didn't dare remove it. I feared it would have meant not only losing my social circle, but risking my freedom and possibly my life if it led to the people around me discovering the truth about my apostasy. And so I continued to wear it for the longest four months of my life until I was able to leave the country.

    A few weeks before I was to leave, I was contemplating how and when, if ever, I would tell my closest Muslim friends that I could no longer believe. I decided I could do a test run to see how they would react by admitting that I had thoughts of removing the hijab. Just as I suspected, they reacted with pretty much an intervention, and begged me to reconsider. One friend hastily forwarded a few links about hijab in an attempt to convince me it was obligatory. In her haste, she didn't realize one of the links she sent me actually argued against the necessity of hijab. When I pointed it out, she frantically apologized, and proceeded to fling quote after quote from Qur'an, hadith, and various scholars in an attempt to prove that hijab is required, and then bullied me into obeying with statements like, "Please remember, that any hadith is sunnah.  And we must follow the sunnah also."

    With just days left in the country, I assured them they had convinced me and I would keep the hijab. They seemed satisfied.

    On the day I finally left, I was wearing a long skirt and a thin t-shirt under a flowing black abaya with a black hijab wrapped lightly but securely around my head. I boarded the plane and sat quietly, anxiously yet nervously awaiting my stop in Amsterdam. I felt fine in my abaya and hijab. I knew by then how to wear them comfortably, so I wasn't physically bothered. But I was acutely aware of everyone who looked at me. "I'm on the plane now, I'm home free. I don't have to wear this anymore. Can they tell? Do they see the real me under these shrouds?" Because I could feel it sharply.

    As soon as I arrived in Amsterdam, I headed straight for the restroom. My palms were sweaty and my heart was racing in anticipation of what I was about to do. I was a little shaky standing in the stall as I removed each piece one at a time, folding carefully so they would take up the least amount of room in my bag. I put on the jeans and tank top I had carried with me, and then I hesitated. This was it. The end of the old me.

    I was about to have full possession of my freedom.

    Even more acutely aware of every glance, I stepped out of the restroom. I had gone in quiet, somber, and shrouded. I came out tall, fresh, alive. Had anyone noticed? It didn't matter. The air on my skin gave me goosebumps to the core and I gained confidence with every step. Before I knew it, the hijab was behind me. And I haven't looked back.


    This is very evocative, and eloquent.  And should be put somewhere where it's noticed.  Smiley

    I must not fear. Fear is the mind-killer. Fear is the little-death that brings total obliteration. I will face my fear. I will permit it to pass over me and through me. And when it has gone past I will turn the inner eye to see its path. Where the fear has gone there will be nothing. Only I remain.
  • Hijaabis.
     Reply #47 - February 02, 2013, 09:24 PM

    Front page could do with a change of scenery...................
    Will get more coffee first. Smiley

    Devious, treacherous, murderous, neanderthal, sub-human of the West. bunny
  • Hijaabis.
     Reply #48 - February 02, 2013, 10:12 PM

    Front page could do with a change of scenery...................
    Will get more coffee first. Smiley


    Hmmph...  Doesn't take this long to get coffee. I think you forgot how.    grin12

    (Edit: 'cause I'm paying attention. )

    I see.  Where is the neon and fireworks?   whistling2

    I must not fear. Fear is the mind-killer. Fear is the little-death that brings total obliteration. I will face my fear. I will permit it to pass over me and through me. And when it has gone past I will turn the inner eye to see its path. Where the fear has gone there will be nothing. Only I remain.
  • Hijaabis.
     Reply #49 - February 02, 2013, 10:27 PM

    I used to wear it, I still do when I go to some people but I moved out of town when I finished my degree and took the hijab off there haha! I know it is difficult to get out if the hijab, my social network profiles still have pictures of me in hijab because I am still not brave enough for the comments  wacko


    It will probably take come time to change that. What if you make a new account/profile?

    I have my own soul. My own spark of divine fire.
  • Hijaabis.
     Reply #50 - February 02, 2013, 10:33 PM

    Quote from: Katkouta89 on Today at 05:21 AM
    I used to wear it, I still do when I go to some people but I moved out of town when I finished my degree and took the hijab off there haha! I know it is difficult to get out if the hijab, my social network profiles still have pictures of me in hijab because I am still not brave enough for the comments 


    Just delete the muslim friends from your account simple.

    In my opinion a life without curiosity is not a life worth living
  • Hijaabis.
     Reply #51 - February 02, 2013, 10:57 PM

    This is very evocative, and eloquent.  And should be put somewhere where it's noticed.  Smiley

    Front page could do with a change of scenery...................


    Oh my, I'm flattered. thnkyu

    I hear the rains, I see the fire, I feel the flame. It doesn't change the faces I want to blame for the shame I'm feeling.
    But the winds of change will blow again. And we're the lucky ones who travel on towards the sun.

    Can you hear it calling you?
  • Hijaabis.
     Reply #52 - February 03, 2013, 07:13 AM

    Quote from: Katkouta89 on Today at 05:21 AM
    I used to wear it, I still do when I go to some people but I moved out of town when I finished my degree and took the hijab off there haha! I know it is difficult to get out if the hijab, my social network profiles still have pictures of me in hijab because I am still not brave enough for the comments 


    Just delete the muslim friends from your account simple.


    Yeah that would mean deleting everybody and my family too :s I also have the hijab on in my passport photos and stuff. sigh. But I get you.
  • Hijaabis.
     Reply #53 - February 03, 2013, 11:52 AM

    In the recent uprisings in the Arab Spring, Egypt etc, did many women not wear Hijabs?

    When you are a Bear of Very Little Brain, and you Think of Things, you find sometimes that a Thing which seemed very Thingish inside you is quite different when it gets out into the open and has other people looking at it.


    A.A. Milne,

    "We cannot slaughter each other out of the human impasse"
  • Hijaabis.
     Reply #54 - February 03, 2013, 06:54 PM

    Can you summarise WTF she is on about? grin12

    I got halfway through and gave up.

    Basically: "I don't need other people to tell me what to wear. I will now proceed to tell other people what to wear. I'm not telling you what to wear, but I think you should wear what I tell you to wear."

    Too fucking busy, and vice versa.
  • Hijaabis.
     Reply #55 - February 03, 2013, 07:08 PM

    ^No, no, no Ishina you got it all wrong. It's not her who wants you to wear a hijab, it's Allah.
  • Hijaabis.
     Reply #56 - February 03, 2013, 07:13 PM

    Not even my own Mother tells me what to wear, and she'd definitely beat Allah in a fight.

    Too fucking busy, and vice versa.
  • Hijaabis.
     Reply #57 - February 03, 2013, 07:15 PM

    Oh come on, anybody could beat a non-existent entity in a fight. 
  • Hijaabis.
     Reply #58 - February 03, 2013, 07:16 PM

    My mom could beat Allah into existence and then back out again.

    Too fucking busy, and vice versa.
  • Hijaabis.
     Reply #59 - February 03, 2013, 07:17 PM

    Nice.
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