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Theme Changer

 Topic: Journal : Archaeology & the 1st 70 Years of Islam

 (Read 2812 times)
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  • Journal : Archaeology & the 1st 70 Years of Islam
     OP - December 01, 2012, 09:43 AM

    "Abstract

    The  rarity of material  evidence for  the religion of Islam  during the Ž rst seventy years of
    the hijra (622-92 CE)  has been used to attack the traditional positivist account of the rise of
    Islam. However, the earliest declarations of Islam are to be found on media produced by the
    early Islamic state. It  is therefore mistake to read too much signiŽ cance into the  absence of
    such declarations prior to the formation of that state by ®Abd  al-Malik (685-705 CE).  There
    is little prospect that  archaeology will uncover new  evidence of Islam from the Ž rst seventy
    years."

    http://faculty.ksu.edu.sa/archaeology/Publications/Islamic%20Archaeology/Archaeology%20and%20the%20History%20of%20Early%20Islam.pdf

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  • Re: Journal : Archaeology & the 1st 70 Years of Islam
     Reply #1 - December 01, 2012, 11:17 AM

    Good find!


    "we can smell traitors and country haters"


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    Love is Blind. Stevie Wonder is blind. Therefore, Stevie Wonder is God.

  • Re: Journal : Archaeology & the 1st 70 Years of Islam
     Reply #2 - December 01, 2012, 01:41 PM


    That paper again gives strength to the inquiry that there was No   "Muhammad"  Character in Early Islam that is depicted in Quran as well as in hadith . These are cock and bull stories added in to Islamic literature some times in 8th and 9th century.,  The character of "Muhammad"   depicted in Quran closely parallels Moses of Judaism and Jesus of Christianity., The exception  being some rabid verses on Loot....booty  such as Zaid/Zainab story and that whole surah  AT-TALAQ .. Other wise Muhammad of Quran just leader of his tribe.. Like Moses to Jews of that time.

    Where as the guy "The Muhammad of Haidth" is simply many criminal characters/war lords  put together with some added goody goody stories..

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Journal : Archaeology & the 1st 70 Years of Islam
     Reply #3 - June 13, 2015, 02:46 PM

    Bump.

    `But I don't want to go among mad people,' Alice remarked.
     `Oh, you can't help that,' said the Cat: `we're all mad here. I'm mad.  You're mad.'
     `How do you know I'm mad?' said Alice.
     `You must be,' said the Cat, `or you wouldn't have come here.'
  • Journal : Archaeology & the 1st 70 Years of Islam
     Reply #4 - June 13, 2015, 04:37 PM

    I consider Jeremy Johns's old article to be a Product Of Its Time (as the saying goes). Its time, 2003, was the year of Yehuda Nevo: "Crossroads To Islam" and "What The Koran Really Says". These had argued for strong archaeological support of John Wansbrough's thesis that the Qur'an was extremely late. Johns (and Hoyland) invalidated a lot of that support.

    But saying that Nevo was wrong on some details (Nevo often was wrong, sometimes hilariously so) is not the same as saying "There is little prospect that archaeology will uncover new evidence of Islam from the first seventy years". In 2003 alone Stephen Shoemaker put out "Christmas in the Koran", which offered new evidence for at least one origin-point of Islam in the Kathisma church. I mean, if there hasn't been any new discoveries found, let's just say that some of the threads right in this forum would be a LOT shorter. . .
  • Journal : Archaeology & the 1st 70 Years of Islam
     Reply #5 - April 28, 2018, 01:55 PM

     well  this  is an  important subject  and many posts that are relevant  to this  subject   are scattered  all over the forum   ..so let us  put such  posts which are related  to  Archaeology of Arabia  or/and  Arabian inscriptions   together here

    ARCHAEOLOGY AND THE HISTORY OF EARLY ISLAM: THE FIRST SEVENTY YEARS BY  JEREMY JOHNS    2003  

    Quote
    Abstract      

    The rarity of material evidence for the religion of Islam during the Ž rst seventy years of the hijra (622-92 CE) has been used to attack the traditional positivist account of the rise of Islam. However, the earliest declarations of Islam are to be found on media produced by the early Islamic state. It is therefore mistake to read too much signiŽ cance into the absence of such declarations prior to the formation of that state by ®Abd al-Malik (685-705 CE). There is little prospect that archaeology will uncover new evidence of Islam from the Ž rst seventy years.Abstract

            
    Traces of the hamza in the Early Arabic Script: The Inscriptions of Zuhayr, Qays the Scribe, and ‘Yazīd the King’ (Arabian Epigraphic Notes 4, 2018, pp. 35-52)  by  Mehdy Shaddel  2018                                      
                                                        
    Quote
    Abstract    
     
    The present article re-edits three early Islamic inscriptions that exhibit anorthographic feature believed to represent the glottal stop (hamz ). Over-all, this orthographic device (referred to as ‘proto-hamza’) is employed fourtimes in the three inscriptions, bringing the number of its known attesta-tions to a grand total of nine. The article concludes by making some broadobservations on the multifarious nature of the early Arabic writing traditions

      
      
     
    The Inscription of Zuhayr, the oldest Islamic Inscription (AH 24/AD 644)  by Robert Hoyland  Arab. arch. epig. 2008: 19: 209–236 (2008)  
     
    Quote
    Abstract  

    This article provides an edition, translation and analysis of an inscriptiondated 24 AH (644 AD) discovered recently in north-west Saudi Arabia. It isan immensely important find, since it is our earliest dated Arabic inscription;it apparently contains a reference to the caliph ‘Umar I and shows evidenceof a fully-fledged system of diacritical marks. The latter aspect is of greatsignificance for our understanding of the development of the Arabic scriptand of the writing down of Arabic texts, especially the Qur’an. The text iscompared with others composed in the decades shortly before and after therise of Islam


    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Journal : Archaeology & the 1st 70 Years of Islam
     Reply #6 - April 29, 2018, 08:00 AM

    So those of you who are interested in  the rational and  scientific analysis  of early   Islam through  Archaeology   and  through those   rocks  and  rock inscriptions,   this is a good journal to   scan through
               
     
     well clicking  the above  link takes you to  the     .Wiley online library  of  that   journal  to  scan  through all  volumes of that journal since that  first  volume in dec 1990   ...
     
    here is  one full publication A rock inscription mentioning Thaʿlaba, an Arab king from Ghassan     a  full  paper  pdf file  I scanned through for  some  interesting reading .. 

    Quote
    This article is the edition and commentary of an inscription discovered some time agoin the area of Eilat. It is written in a script that is transitional between Nabataean and  Arabic, is presumably dated to the late fifth century AD and mentions an Arab king

        that   is what authors   say  in its  abstract

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Journal : Archaeology & the 1st 70 Years of Islam
     Reply #7 - April 29, 2018, 09:02 AM

    There’s also Arabian Epigraphic Notes, the open access journal edited by Ahmad Al-Jallad. List of articles here

    Ahmad Al-Jallad podcast: what writing can tell us about the Arabs before Islam
    Quote
    In most world history survey courses, Arabia is introduced for the first time only as backstory to the rise of Islam. We’re told that there was a tradition of oral poetry in Arabic, a language native to central Arabia, and that the Qur’an was the zenith of this oral tradition. New evidence, however, suggests that Arabia was linguistically diverse, that the language we’ve come to know as Arabic originated in modern day Jordan, and that the looping cursive writing system that’s become the language’s hallmark wasn’t the original system used to write it. What to make of all this?

    Guest Ahmad al-Jallad co-directs archaeological/epigraphic projects in Jordan and Saudi Arabia, uncovering new inscriptions thousands of years old, and shares his research that’s shedding new light on the writings of a complex civilization that lived in the Arabian peninsula for centuries before Islam arose.


    Interview with Ahmad Al-Jallad https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=3n39uJ9yx6k https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=q7p4TYe-VMo
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