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Theme Changer

 Topic: Random Science Posts

 (Read 69354 times)
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  • Random Science Posts
     Reply #510 - June 03, 2015, 08:01 AM

    Quote
    Ah. I noticed you've added a Freeman Dyson vid to your post. Dyson used to be good at physics, but has no expertise in climate science. There are plenty of dissections of his views available.


    Spot on Osmathus.

    What many people don't understand is that a specialist in one part of physics has no more expertise in another specialist area than an undergraduate. They could of course get up to speed a lot faster than the average person but that would require 'doing the maths' - in other words a lot of bloody hard work.

    However, there is a lamentable tendency for some grand old scientists who are reknowned in one field, to become so convinced of their own genius that they make completely stupid comments about areas of science they know very little about. This phenomenon is sometimes known as 'going emeritus'. Physicist are particularly prone to this, (to my eternal shame) and there are even comics about it:

    http://www.smbc-comics.com/?id=2556


  • Random Science Posts
     Reply #511 - June 03, 2015, 08:22 PM

     Cheesy Afro

    `But I don't want to go among mad people,' Alice remarked.
     `Oh, you can't help that,' said the Cat: `we're all mad here. I'm mad.  You're mad.'
     `How do you know I'm mad?' said Alice.
     `You must be,' said the Cat, `or you wouldn't have come here.'
  • Random Science Posts
     Reply #512 - June 06, 2015, 12:41 AM

    Hey this is cool. A undergrad student came up with a brand new way of using radio telescopes to image stuff in 3D. Afro

    How an undergraduate discovered tubes of plasma in the sky

    Quote
    The discovery by an undergraduate student of tubes of plasma drifting above Earth has made headlines in the past few days. Many people have asked how the discovery was made and, in particular, how an undergraduate student was able to do it.

    The answer is a combination of an amazing new telescope, a very smart student and an unexpected fusion of two areas of science.

    Here is how it all happened, from my perspective as the academic who supervised the project at the Sydney Institute for Astronomy.

    My research involves studying the variability of stars and galaxies using a new radio telescope, the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA). My colleagues and I were worried about the ionosphere being a problem for this research, because at low frequencies it can distort the radio signals that we receive from outer space.

    This makes celestial objects appear to jiggle around, be stretched and squeezed, and change in brightness. I knew this would be a problem for my plan to study how the brightness of stars and galaxies varied, so I wanted to find out how severe the distortion was.

    The ionosphere is the part of the Earth’s atmosphere that has been ionised by radiation from the sun. It is made up of a plasma in which the gas molecules have lost one or more electrons. It stretches between 50 to 1,000 kilometres above the Earth’s surface (commercial aeroplanes typically fly at 10 kilometres above the Earth). Importantly, it refracts radio waves, affecting radio communication around the world.

    At the beginning of last year I had a final-year undergraduate student, Cleo Loi – who also contributed to this article – looking for a research project, so I gave her the task of investigating how much the ionosphere was affecting astronomical observations with the MWA.

    Read the rest on the link.

    Also haz vids. parrot


    Devious, treacherous, murderous, neanderthal, sub-human of the West. bunny
  • Random Science Posts
     Reply #513 - June 06, 2015, 09:25 PM

    Tom Holland on dinosaurs: http://www.theguardian.com/books/2015/jun/05/dinomania-dinosaur-obsession-science
  • Random Science Posts
     Reply #514 - June 06, 2015, 09:31 PM

    Hey this is cool. A undergrad student came up with a brand new way of using radio telescopes to image stuff in 3D. Afro

    How an undergraduate discovered tubes of plasma in the sky
    Read the rest on the link.

    Also haz vids. parrot




    One has to appreciate how youth can provide innovation us grey beards have ignored.
  • Random Science Posts
     Reply #515 - June 06, 2015, 11:24 PM


    From the article:

    Quote
    ...nor will there be anything as terrifying in Jurassic World as the likelihood that we ourselves are currently precipitating the most lethal culling of species since the end of the Cretaceous.

    Nah. That's not terrifying. Most people aren't even aware of it, and wouldn't really give a shit anyway. The important thing is what's going on with Big Brother this week.

    Devious, treacherous, murderous, neanderthal, sub-human of the West. bunny
  • Random Science Posts
     Reply #516 - July 22, 2015, 09:35 PM

    Genetic studies link indigenous peoples in the Amazon and Australasia:

    https://hms.harvard.edu/news/american-history-201

    https://mobile.twitter.com/pontus_skoglund

    It looks like this bears out some of the arguments for humans arriving in the Americas earlier than is usually accepted
    (at least in the English speaking world - Latin Americans tend to be more open to these ideas):

    http://www.nytimes.com/2014/03/28/world/americas/discoveries-challenge-beliefs-on-humans-arrival-in-the-americas.html
  • Random Science Posts
     Reply #517 - August 15, 2015, 10:26 AM

    Lexical distances between European languages


  • Random Science Posts
     Reply #518 - August 15, 2015, 11:28 AM

    Genetic studies link indigenous peoples in the Amazon and Australasia:

    https://hms.harvard.edu/news/american-history-201

    https://mobile.twitter.com/pontus_skoglund

    It looks like this bears out some of the arguments for humans arriving in the Americas earlier than is usually accepted
    (at least in the English speaking world - Latin Americans tend to be more open to these ideas):

    http://www.nytimes.com/2014/03/28/world/americas/discoveries-challenge-beliefs-on-humans-arrival-in-the-americas.html


    There are an increasing amount of finds that push the standard date back at least by several thousand years. I wonder if such finding point towards a series of migrations to the New World in a similar manner as the migrations from the Steppe regions to more fertile areas such as Central Asia, China, Europe, etc. Earlier migration(s) can hint at a higher level of development as such massive movements do require the ability to sustain the current migratory population but also adaptability of this population to the new environment. I also wonder if there are any animal species that could be identified which have/had a history of herd/seasonal migrations which the human population followed and used as a food supply. At the very least I think humans ability to "farm" the coastal areas for food supplies was more developed then was thought. In my opinion coastal fish seems be the most likely mainstay food supply once terrestrial animal migration patterns stop between continents.
  • Random Science Posts
     Reply #519 - August 15, 2015, 08:04 PM

    ^Or if you accept the earlier dates proposed for Pedra Furada then that would push it back much further. The genetic findings at least seem consistent with an early and distinct population. I haven't seen any suggestions of animal migrations playing a part in South America. North America may have been different.
  • Random Science Posts
     Reply #520 - September 17, 2015, 02:50 AM

    New Species Of Human Discovered In South Africa



    A reconstruction of Homo naledi’s head by paleoartist John Gurche, who spent some 700 hours recreating the head from bone scans. University of the Witwatersrand, National Geographic Society and the South African National Research Foundation.

    Quote
    Brace yourself: this discovery is huge. So huge that its profound implications will shake up our very own family tree. The University of Witwatersrand, in collaboration with National Geographic, is proud to announce a remarkable story of human heritage. The discovery of an early human ancestor that sits beautifully within our own genus of Homo. I ecstatically present to you, Homo naledi.

    This incredible fossil find comes from the richest single hominin assemblage so far discovered in Africa. A gift that keeps on giving, the species not only enlightens us on the origins and diversity of man, but also seems to display a behavior long believed to be unique to humans, even perhaps a defining feature of our species: deliberately disposing of its dead in an isolated chamber. The discovery has been published in two papers in the open access journal eLife.

    A textbook-worthy accident, H. naledi was first stumbled upon two years ago by amateur cavers during an exploration of a cave system known as Rising Star, located within South Africa’s famous Cradle of Humankind World Heritage Site. From this, the Rising Star Expedition was born, starting in November 2013 with a 21 day exploration involving a team of 60 scientists and volunteer cavers. Expecting to recover a single skeleton, just three days in they realized they had much more than that, “something different and extraordinary,” research leader Lee Berger said at a press event IFLScience attended.

    That something different turned out to be not several, but 15 individuals from a single hominin species, represented by more than 1,500 fossil elements found within a single chamber in total darkness some 90 meters (295 feet) from the entrance. Named in tribute to the chamber, naledi means “star” in the South African language Sesotho. And sure, 1,500 sounds like a lot, is a lot, but the team believes that there are thousands and thousands of remains still untouched. “The floor is practically made of bones of these individuals,” Berger added.




    Homo naledi. cc John Hawks_Wits University

    Quote
    In fact, so many have been recovered that almost every skeletal element of the body is represented multiple times throughout different age groups, from infants to teens, to young adults and the elderly. And the species seems to be a wonderful pick and mix of both primitive and human-like features. An exceptionally tall hominid, the bipedal H. naledi stood at around 150 centimeters (5 feet) and was distinctively slender, with powerful, well-muscled joints. Its skinny human proportions and long legs likely relate to the fact that it didn’t have to support much bodyweight, weighing in at around 45 kilograms (100 pounds).

    Tall this species may have been, but members had an astonishingly tiny head. So tiny that their brains were as small as that of the smallest australopith – a group of extinct early hominins – with the females’ brains only being slightly larger than a chimpanzee’s at around 450-550 cubic centimeters (27-34 cubic inches). There was only a very small discrepancy between males and females, not just in terms of brain size but throughout the entire body. In fact, all of the individuals were remarkably similar, more so than if you were looking at sets of identical human twins, Berger said. Consequently, it is believed the individuals were likely closely related, perhaps a multi-generational family.

    What is also remarkable is how the species seems to transition in its features, from primitive to modern, as you move down the limbs. The top of the limbs – the pelvis and shoulders – are primitive, like its cone-shaped core, but they culminate in astonishingly human-like extremities. The hand is almost entirely human-like, except for the highly curved fingers: perfect if they’re trying to grip things. But their shoulders were able to rotate more than ours, suggesting they engaged in climbing. And the feet were virtually indistinguishable from ours, making contact with the ground in a similar way.




    Homo naledi foot and partially reconstructed skull. Taken at the University of Witwatersrand. Credit: Justine Alford

    Quote
    So how did this collection of individuals arrive in this dark, isolated and extremely difficult to access cave? And difficult is not an understatement: one of the narrowest cracks was a mere 17.5 centimeters wide, and as far as the group can tell, there were no other entrances to the tiny chamber. So unwelcoming that no other species were found here, aside from a few rodent and bird bones.

    After ruling all of the probable scenarios, such as mass death, transport by water and predation, the team was left with the improbable: this species was deliberately, repeatedly disposing of its dead in a protected area, away from the external environment. Before now, we thought that was a characteristic specific to modern humans.

    “What does that mean for us?” ponders Berger. “Did we inherit it, has it always been there in our lineage, or did they invent it?” And for a species with such a tiny brain, the latter possibility is mind-boggling.

    Of course, the questions do not end there. The chamber was in total darkness. How did the individuals navigate their way round these slender, jagged tunnels with death-drops around multiple corners?

    “Is it a coincidence that the earliest evidence of controlled fire is only 800 meters away?” asked Berger, referring to the nearby National Heritage Site of Swartkrans. “It’s speculation… But animals don’t go into the dark.”

    Aside from the evidence of ritualistic burial, what else do we know about their behavior? “Nothing,” Berger chuckled to IFLScience. “We can infer from their bodies that they are long-distance walkers, again that’s something almost unique to humans. And it’s pretty clear from those fingers that they’re climbing, but we don’t know what they’re climbing. That’s not a tree climbing hand.”




    Homo naledi hand, showing the curved fingers, taken at the University of Witswatersrand. Credit: Justine Alford

    Quote
    As it stands, we don’t know how old the fossils are, nor do we know for how long the species existed. But we know it’s a minimum of 2 million years old, perhaps even close to 3 million, and at the very least a candidate for the base of our genus, says Berger.

    And if you want to see and encounter this historic find for yourself, the fossils will be on display for an entire month in the Cradle of Humankind's official visitor center, Maropeng.


    `But I don't want to go among mad people,' Alice remarked.
     `Oh, you can't help that,' said the Cat: `we're all mad here. I'm mad.  You're mad.'
     `How do you know I'm mad?' said Alice.
     `You must be,' said the Cat, `or you wouldn't have come here.'
  • Random Science Posts
     Reply #521 - September 17, 2015, 06:32 AM

    Wow. That's awesome

    "I moreover believe that any religion that has anything in it that shocks the mind of a child, cannot be a true system."
    -Thomas Paine
  • Random Science Posts
     Reply #522 - October 08, 2015, 10:18 PM

    Nuclear disasters are great for the environment (because they get rid of the real problem)

    Quote
    The site of the world’s worst nuclear accident is now a wildlife haven. The abundance of large animals around Chernobyl, such as deer, elk and wild boar, matches that of nature reserves in the region – and wolves are seven times as common.

    Some 116,000 people fled the radioactive fallout from the reactor after it exploded in 1986, and another 220,000 were resettled after that, vacating a zone covering some 4200 square kilometres split equally between Belarus and Ukraine.

    “Whatever negative effects there are from radiation, they are not as large as the negative effects of having people there,” says Jim Smith of the University of Portsmouth in the UK. “We’re not saying there weren’t radiological effects at all, but we can’t see effects on populations as a whole.”

    The message is clear, he says. “The everyday things we do, such as occupying an area, forestry, hunting and agriculture, are what damages the environment.”


    Devious, treacherous, murderous, neanderthal, sub-human of the West. bunny
  • Random Science Posts
     Reply #523 - October 09, 2015, 08:54 AM


     Cheesy Cheesy Cheesy.. So dear jungle living Osama. let us spread some nuclear waste form power plants all over the globe..

    that is good one.. thanks.. well you guys have to watch this

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IEmms6vn-p8

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e9Ts18dxuH0


    Do not let silence become your legacy.. Question everything   
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Random Science Posts
     Reply #524 - October 09, 2015, 09:12 AM

    NASA Rover Finds Evidence That Mars Once Had Lakes

    http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2015/10/08/446965582/nasa-rover-finds-that-mars-once-had-lakes

    Mars once hosted lakes, flowing water

    http://news.sciencemag.org/space/2015/10/mars-once-hosted-lakes-flowing-water

    Mars had a long-lasting series of lakes, NASA's Curiosity rover finds

    http://www.latimes.com/science/sciencenow/la-sci-sn-mars-lakes-curiosity-20151008-story.html

    Neil deGrasse Tyson explains why we should care there's water on Mars.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a0SUpwIAjQs

    `But I don't want to go among mad people,' Alice remarked.
     `Oh, you can't help that,' said the Cat: `we're all mad here. I'm mad.  You're mad.'
     `How do you know I'm mad?' said Alice.
     `You must be,' said the Cat, `or you wouldn't have come here.'
  • Random Science Posts
     Reply #525 - December 07, 2015, 11:46 PM

    Here's a good one. The possibility of finding intelligent life on Earth may be diminishing. It turns out that increased CO2 levels have a detrimental effect on cognition, which really isn't surprising if you take a few deep breaths and think about it.

    So in general the effect starts being noticeable about where we are now for overall lower atmosphere levels. It's delayed for crisis response and strategy, but OTOH appears to have started a linear downward trend for information usage at levels well below 500 ppm.

    So, not only will being stupid make it more likely we will get fried, a process which is already known to be well and truly underway, but the more we fry the stupider we are likely to get, thereby reducing the effectiveness of future decision making.

    I can see this ending well. parrot

    Elevated CO2 Levels Directly Affect Human Cognition, New Harvard Study Shows

    Quote
    In a landmark public health finding, a new study from the Harvard School of Public Health finds that carbon dioxide (CO2) has a direct and negative impact on human cognition and decision-making. These impacts have been observed at CO2 levels that most Americans — and their children — are routinely exposed to today inside classrooms, offices, homes, planes, and cars.

    Carbon dioxide levels are inevitably higher indoors than the baseline set by the outdoor air used for ventilation, a baseline that is rising at an accelerating rate thanks to human activity, especially the burning of fossil fuels. So this seminal research has equally great importance for climate policy, providing an entirely new public health impetus for keeping global CO2 levels as low as possible.

    In a series of articles, I will examine the implications for public health both today (indoors) as well as in the future (indoors and out) due to rising CO2 levels. This series is the result of a year-long investigation for Climate Progress and my new Oxford University Press book coming out next week, “Climate Change: What Everyone Needs to Know.” This investigative report is built on dozens of studies and literature reviews as well as exclusive interviews with many of the world’s leading experts in public health and indoor air quality, including authors of both studies.


    Devious, treacherous, murderous, neanderthal, sub-human of the West. bunny
  • Random Science Posts
     Reply #526 - December 08, 2015, 01:09 AM

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BBvIweCIgwk

    `But I don't want to go among mad people,' Alice remarked.
     `Oh, you can't help that,' said the Cat: `we're all mad here. I'm mad.  You're mad.'
     `How do you know I'm mad?' said Alice.
     `You must be,' said the Cat, `or you wouldn't have come here.'
  • Random Science Posts
     Reply #527 - December 08, 2015, 01:24 AM

    You may also enjoy this. It's very well written, and brings together information from a wide range of fields. I found it quite fascinating.

    Diabolical - Why have we failed to address climate change?

    A short excerpt:

    Quote
    These psychological studies use statistical methods with individual, mainly American, subjects. Meanwhile, Kari Marie Norgaard’s Living in Denial, an investigation of the psychological sources of resistance to confronting the question of climate change, is based on one year’s close observation of a single Norwegian town at a time of baffling weather patterns. Hers is a study not of individuals but of the interface of individual and society, or what she calls “the social organisation of denial”. Norgaard found that while the townspeople denied neither the reality nor the gravity of climate change, it played little role in their daily life. Climate change was rarely discussed. When it was, it proved to be a conversation stopper. The townspeople thought it an inappropriate topic for the education of their children. They felt the need to protect themselves from its reality, for, if confronted, it filled them with a sense of helplessness, dread and personal guilt. They shielded behind their image of Norway as a small country incapable of making much difference one way or another, their pride in Norway as an environmentally responsible nation, and their oft-expressed anger at the climate-change recklessness of George W Bush’s “Amerika”.

    Norgaard’s study is interesting in part because it suggests that psychological denial offers a more general clue to the puzzle of humankind’s incapacity to rise to the challenge of climate change than the kind of political denialism found more or less exclusively in the US, the United Kingdom, Canada and Australia. Even more, it is interesting because of her observation that climate change undermined the townspeople’s sense of “ontological security”, their vital need for confidence in the continuity of their community’s life. George Marshall is, like Norgaard, a climate-change participant-observer. In his Don’t Even Think About It, he also notes how often the topic rapidly changes if climate change is raised in polite conversation. But he goes further than Norgaard. Marshall tells us that if he was able to engage people in conversation about climate change, rather frequently it led to discussions about death, an even more taboo topic. In his great encyclical Laudato Si, Pope Francis recently expressed most succinctly the kind of ontological insecurity aroused by recognition of the climate-change crisis: humankind’s fearfulness about the continuity of our life on Earth. “Doomsday predictions can no longer be met with irony or disdain.”


    Devious, treacherous, murderous, neanderthal, sub-human of the West. bunny
  • Random Science Posts
     Reply #528 - December 09, 2015, 10:09 PM

    And yet another report from The Science That Dare Not Speak Its Name. parrot

    The UK's Met Office has just released a nice new study. What they were looking at was, basically, whether the current scenarios that inform policy makers are realistic scenarios. The answer is no.

    This would be problematic in itself, but is compounded by the fact that policy makers start with those scenarios, then assume things can't really be that bad (because things being that bad would make them feel very uncomfortable) so decide to do less than the scenarios require anyway. However, at least there is now another study confirming that the guiding scenarios are not at all realistic which, if policy makers are capable of being at all realistic*, might prompt further action.

    UK Met Office - Large scale carbon capture technology is not the answer to climate change

    The study itself is available from Nature as an open access paper: Biophysical and economic limits to negative CO2 emissions


    *Which is definitely not the case with the current Australian government, AFAICT.

    Devious, treacherous, murderous, neanderthal, sub-human of the West. bunny
  • Random Science Posts
     Reply #529 - December 28, 2015, 11:20 PM

    Hey, some good news for a change. This is still early research, but is potentially awesome yes yes

    Scientists combine evolutionary biology and mathematics to reverse antibiotic resistance

    Quote
    For more than a decade, biologist Mariam Barlow has been working on the theory that administering antibiotics on a rotating basis could be a solution to antibiotic resistance. After years of research, Barlow had lots of data, but she needed a more precise way to make sense of it all — something that was so specific it could easily be used to treat patients. So, she joined forces with a team of mathematicians. And the amazing results could help solve an enormous, worldwide problem.

    In a nutshell, the team of biologists and mathematicians developed a software program that generates a road map to reverse the evolution of antibiotic resistance in bacteria. In a study published earlier this month in the journal PLOS ONE, they unveiled a mathematical model that pinpoints optimal antibiotic cycling patterns with the highest probability of turning back the evolutionary clock of antibiotic resistance. Barlow, an evolutionary biologist and associate professor at the University of California-Merced School of Natural Sciences, told me that she and fellow researchers found cycles of antibiotics that could reverse resistance and drive bacteria back to a state observed in the 1960s — a state the researchers call the “wild type state.” So it’s not surprising that the software that makes it all possible was aptly named “Time Machine.”

    “It makes sense that we would look for answers (to antibiotic resistance) in evolutionary biology,” Barlow told me. “Bacteria are so good at evolving — and they’ll probably find new ways we don’t even know about yet — but based on what we’ve seen, this is something we can deal with. Antibiotic resistance is something we can handle.”


    Devious, treacherous, murderous, neanderthal, sub-human of the West. bunny
  • Random Science Posts
     Reply #530 - December 29, 2015, 12:11 AM

    Smart cookies.  Smiley

    how fuck works without shit??


    Let's Play Chess!

    harakaat, friend, RIP
  • Random Science Posts
     Reply #531 - December 29, 2015, 09:54 AM

    Hey, some good news for a change. This is still early research, but is potentially awesome yes yes

    Scientists combine evolutionary biology and mathematics to reverse antibiotic resistance



     cheers

    `But I don't want to go among mad people,' Alice remarked.
     `Oh, you can't help that,' said the Cat: `we're all mad here. I'm mad.  You're mad.'
     `How do you know I'm mad?' said Alice.
     `You must be,' said the Cat, `or you wouldn't have come here.'
  • Random Science Posts
     Reply #532 - December 29, 2015, 10:18 PM

    Ladies and gentlemen! And Quod! We have passed a magnificent milestone! dance

    So as most people would probably know, it's currently winter in the Arctic. This means no sun for months up there. It is currently smack in the middle of winter, and really dark at the North Pole. You would expect it to be really, really cold. It usually is. Not this week.

    The magnificent milestone we have just passed is that, for the first time in human history, temperature at the North Pole in the middle of the Arctic winter will be above freezing.

    Isn't that wonderful? We managed to do that all by ourselves. Yay team! bunny

    “Most Terrifying” Weather Ends a Hot 2015

    Quote

    The remarkable storm will briefly boost temperatures in the Arctic basin to nearly 10 degrees Fahrenheit warmer than normal—and the North Pole itself will be pushed above the freezing point, with temperatures perhaps as warm as 40 degrees. That’s absolutely terrifying and incredibly rare. Keep in mind: It’s late December and dark 24 hours a day at the North Pole right now. The typical average high temperature this time of year at the North Pole is about minus 15 to minus 20 degrees. To create temperatures warm enough to melt ice to exist in the dead of winter—some 50 or 60 degrees warmer than normal—is unthinkable.

    For some perspective, I contacted a team of climate scientists at the University of Washington who maintain a fleet of weather monitoring equipment near the North Pole. James Morison, the principal investigator of the North Pole Environmental Observatory, said he’s “never heard of” temperatures above freezing in the wintertime there. Looking closer at the weather data, it appears this event is in fact unprecedented during the time period from late December through late April.

    On Wednesday, the North Pole will be warmer than Western Texas, Southern California, and parts of the Sahara.


    Devious, treacherous, murderous, neanderthal, sub-human of the West. bunny
  • Random Science Posts
     Reply #533 - December 29, 2015, 10:32 PM

    Ladies and gentlemen! And Quod! We have passed a magnificent milestone! dance
     

    The magnificent milestone we have just passed is that, for the first time in human history, temperature at the North Pole in the middle of the Arctic winter will be above freezing.

    Isn't that wonderful? We managed to do that all by ourselves. Yay team! bunny

    “Most Terrifying” Weather Ends a Hot 2015


    That is one heck of a fantastic news.. .. Now I will move to north pole to grow some veggie garden ...

    Do not let silence become your legacy.. Question everything   
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Random Science Posts
     Reply #534 - December 29, 2015, 10:54 PM

    There is no land at the North Pole. Tongue

    Devious, treacherous, murderous, neanderthal, sub-human of the West. bunny
  • Random Science Posts
     Reply #535 - December 29, 2015, 10:57 PM

    There is no land at the North Pole. Tongue

    Damn..


    well then I will move to south pole via Australia ..  Sure south will follow North.. 

    Do not let silence become your legacy.. Question everything   
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Random Science Posts
     Reply #536 - December 30, 2015, 01:51 AM

    I don´t think it fair that it is colder where I am than it is at the North Pole.

    Don't let Hitler have the street.
  • Random Science Posts
     Reply #537 - December 30, 2015, 05:54 AM

    Move to the North Pole.

    Anyway, as it turns out, the temperature at the North Pole itself doesn't seem to have gone above freezing. However, it did go above freezing only a few hundred kilometres from the Pole, which is still a pretty good effort.

    Since 2016 is predicted to be hotter than 2015, there's still a good chance for above-zero temperatures at the North Pole during next year's Arctic winter. By 2030, it will probably be common.

    Devious, treacherous, murderous, neanderthal, sub-human of the West. bunny
  • Random Science Posts
     Reply #538 - December 30, 2015, 07:42 AM

    A number of Americans will be paddling boats over NYC after it's flooded saying they still don't believe it.

    `But I don't want to go among mad people,' Alice remarked.
     `Oh, you can't help that,' said the Cat: `we're all mad here. I'm mad.  You're mad.'
     `How do you know I'm mad?' said Alice.
     `You must be,' said the Cat, `or you wouldn't have come here.'
  • Random Science Posts
     Reply #539 - December 30, 2015, 08:09 AM

    There are some astoundingly dumb motherfuckers in the world.

    Devious, treacherous, murderous, neanderthal, sub-human of the West. bunny
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