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Theme Changer

 Topic: Islam and Science Fiction

 (Read 3221 times)
  • 1« Previous thread | Next thread »
  • Islam and Science Fiction
     OP - January 06, 2012, 06:55 AM

    One of the factors that led to me saying goodbye to xianity was science fiction, especially Arthur C Clarke.

    How much scifi is read and watched by Muslims?  Might it be a significant approach to dereligionising?

    A few years ago I was on holiday in Switzerland and the gods led me to the art gallery of the guy who did Alien.  The following link is definitely haram and nsfw!

    http://www.hrgiger.com/

    When you are a Bear of Very Little Brain, and you Think of Things, you find sometimes that a Thing which seemed very Thingish inside you is quite different when it gets out into the open and has other people looking at it.


    A.A. Milne,

    "We cannot slaughter each other out of the human impasse"
  • Re: Islam and Science Fiction
     Reply #1 - January 06, 2012, 08:21 AM

    I doubt sci fi helps anyone loose religion.

    The amount of Sci Fi read by Muslims is proportional to the amount of quran and hadith read by muslims.

    Nothing can be more contrary to religion and the clergy than reason and common sense. - Voltaire
  • Re: Islam and Science Fiction
     Reply #2 - January 06, 2012, 08:52 AM

    I understand scifi to be critically important.  It does two things.  It creates an alternative fantasy world to that created by the religion, of itself very important by actually stating there is more than one way to understand the world, and playing with ideas about what might other worlds and cultures be like.

    Ursula le Guin is an important example.

    Quote
    Always Coming Home is a novel by Ursula K. Le Guin published in 1985. This novel is about a cultural group of humans—the Kesh—who "might be going to have lived a long, long time from now in Northern California." (p. i) Part novel, part textbook, part anthropologist's record, Always Coming Home explains the life and culture of the Kesh people.[1]


    The book weaves around the story of a Kesh woman called Stone Telling, who lived for years with her father's people—the Dayao or Condor people, whose society is rigid, patriarchal, hierarchical and militarily expansionist. The story fills less than a third of the book, with the rest being a mixture of Kesh cultural lore (including poetry, prose of various kinds, mythos, rituals, and recipes), essays on Kesh culture, and the musings of the narrator, "Pandora".

    Some editions of the book were accompanied by a tape of Kesh music and poetry.

    Pandora describes the book as a protest against contemporary civilization, which the Kesh call "the Sickness of Man". Pandora muses that one key difference is that the Kesh have solved the problem of overpopulation—there are many fewer of them than there are of us. They use such inventions of civilization as writing, steel, guns, electricity, trains, and a computer network (see below). However, unlike most neighboring societies, they reject government, a non-laboring caste, expansion of population or territory, disbelief in what we consider supernatural, and human domination of the natural environment. They blend millennia of human economic culture by combining aspects of hunter-gatherer, agriculture, and industry, but reject cities; indeed, what they call towns would count as villages now.

    [edit]Literary significance and criticism

    It has been noted that Always Coming Home underscores Le Guin's long-standing anthropological interests. The Valley of Na is modeled on the landscape of California's Napa Valley, where Ursula Le Guin grew up as a child.[2]
    Like much of Le Guin's work, Always Coming Home follows Native American and Taoist themes.[citation needed] It is set in a time so post-apocalyptic that no cultural source can remember the apocalypse, though a few folk tales refer to our time. The only signs of our civilisation that have lasted into their time are artifacts such as styrofoam and a self-manufacturing, self-maintaining, solar-system-wide computer network.

    Stone Telling's narrative may be seen as a return to the theme of The Dispossessed and The Eye of the Heron, in which a person from an anarchistic society visits an acquisitive government-ruled society and returns.[citation needed]
    [edit]


    The second vector is science - actually discussing science and technology and showing other possibilities.

    Maybe some Islamic Scifi?

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Always_Coming_Home

    When you are a Bear of Very Little Brain, and you Think of Things, you find sometimes that a Thing which seemed very Thingish inside you is quite different when it gets out into the open and has other people looking at it.


    A.A. Milne,

    "We cannot slaughter each other out of the human impasse"
  • Re: Islam and Science Fiction
     Reply #3 - January 06, 2012, 05:04 PM

    I used to read a tonne of science fiction in my youth and it did nothing to stop me turning into a super–religious arsehole later.

    But when it’s done well it IS fantastic.

  • Re: Islam and Science Fiction
     Reply #4 - January 06, 2012, 05:09 PM

    ^^ Yes but wouldn't you say that they might have contributed towards your eventual apostasy?

    I do believe that all the fantasy books (more than sci fi) I used to read when I was younger played a part with how hard it was for me to swallow the Islam lie for the whole of my life.

    Like even recently I was reading a fantasy book in which one of the main characters studies over 300 religions and discards them all for not being consistent or not being able to stand up to scrutiny, not being able to deliver.  It's subtle, but it contributes I'm sure.  Things like that. 

    Inhale the good shit, exhale the bullshit.
  • Re: Islam and Science Fiction
     Reply #5 - January 06, 2012, 06:26 PM

    Well I’m sure watching Star Trek may have eventually contributed to my apostasy as well. Who knows?! Wink

  • Re: Islam and Science Fiction
     Reply #6 - January 07, 2012, 05:27 AM

    Isn't religion just a bronze age form of sci fi as well?  Instead of super fast spaceships you have super fast donkeys flying you to space.  And instead of light sabers you have light people(angels).    

    And not to mention: invisible angels sending down revelations just in time to scold your wife who walked in on you you sleeping with the slave girl.  

    In my opinion a life without curiosity is not a life worth living
  • Re: Islam and Science Fiction
     Reply #7 - January 07, 2012, 02:56 PM

    Quote
    Isn't religion just a bronze age form of sci fi as well?


    Hmm - very interesting possibilities here - bookshops putting the religion section into the fantasy/fiction section, star trek followers being recognised as official religions with charitable and tax advantages.

    Well what does freedom and equality mean?

    New religious buildings designed like the Enterprise....

    When you are a Bear of Very Little Brain, and you Think of Things, you find sometimes that a Thing which seemed very Thingish inside you is quite different when it gets out into the open and has other people looking at it.


    A.A. Milne,

    "We cannot slaughter each other out of the human impasse"
  • Islam and Science Fiction
     Reply #8 - May 21, 2016, 12:53 PM

    Maybe some Islamic Scifi?

    Short story: A Dead Djinn in Cairo
  • Islam and Science Fiction
     Reply #9 - May 23, 2016, 08:49 AM

    Great fun - middle eastern steampunk with Lovecraftian touches.
  • Islam and Science Fiction
     Reply #10 - May 23, 2016, 10:09 AM

    Quote
    Egypt, 1912. In an alternate Cairo infused with the otherworldly, the Ministry of Alchemy, Enchantments and Supernatural Entities investigate disturbances between the mortal and the (possibly) divine. What starts off as an odd suicide case for Special Investigator Fatma el-Sha’arawi leads her through the city’s underbelly as she encounters rampaging ghouls, saucy assassins, clockwork angels, and a plot that could unravel time itself.

  • Islam and Science Fiction
     Reply #11 - May 27, 2016, 07:38 PM

    Superb! Thank you :-)

    When you are a Bear of Very Little Brain, and you Think of Things, you find sometimes that a Thing which seemed very Thingish inside you is quite different when it gets out into the open and has other people looking at it.


    A.A. Milne,

    "We cannot slaughter each other out of the human impasse"
  • Islam and Science Fiction
     Reply #12 - May 27, 2016, 10:53 PM

    Great fun - middle eastern steampunk with Lovecraftian touches.


    I enjoyed it.

    (But I also really like a good space opera)
  • Islam and Science Fiction
     Reply #13 - October 21, 2016, 09:55 AM

    Superheroes from the Middle East
    Quote
    AK Comics was an anomaly when founded in 2001 or 2002 (different years are cited in different sources) by Egyptian businessman Dr. Ayman Kandeel (whose initials gave the publishing house its name), with the aim of producing superhero comics that would promote peace and understanding in the Middle East.2 AK Comics started publishing in 2003–2004, with four different titles collectively called Middle East Heroes: Zein, Aya, Jalila, and Rakan.

    The titles were all set in the same alternate version of the Middle East. Zein dealt with a time-travelling descendant of an old family of pharaohs, whose origin story is similar to that of Superman. Aya is a crime-fighting superhero endowed with an origin story and attributes similar to Batman. Jalila is a nuclear scientist who gains her powers in a nuclear blast, which mirrors the origin story of the Hulk. And finally, Rakan, which is not really a superhero comic, was set in the distant past, featuring a sword-wielding barbarian who seems to have been inspired by Conan the Barbarian.

    Quote
    Teshkeel’s endeavors were refocused on the publication of its original superhero comic book, The 99. Teshkeel was founded by the psychologist Dr. Naif al-Mutawa, who has gained worldwide attention and acclaim for his efforts to create a cultural bridge between the Middle East and the Western world.4 Al-Mutawa also had a didactic aim with his comics: “Islamic culture and Islamic heritage have a lot to be proud and joyful about. The 99 is about bringing those positive elements into global awareness.”5

    The 99 is set in an alternative version of our world, in which the knowledge and power of a fabled library in the Middle East imbues the ninety-nine “Noor Stones” that, upon contact, can turn the right person into a superhero. Dr. Ramzi, a character that shares traits with the group leader Charles Xavier of the X-Men, gathers the people who have found the Noor Stones around him and sets them working for the greater good through his organization, the 99 Steps Foundation.

    Quote
    Teshkeel chose a largely different approach to the superhero genre as compared to AK Comics and, to a greater or lesser degree, they made significant alterations to almost all of the conventions of the genre presented earlier. Eliminating violence and significantly downplaying the sexualization of the heroes were the major adaptations. But other changes were also made, such as the use of superpowers that were designed to fit into a group rather than to work independently, which together with the communal nature of the heroes’ moral code also radically changed the way the stories in The 99 were told, as compared to their American counterparts. The group and their shared goals were always at the forefront in these stories, as opposed to the often much more individualistic approach in American comics, including those that feature groups of superheroes.

    This meant that Teshkeel, through adaptation, created something more original than AK Comics. By adapting almost all of the conventions, however, they changed so much that their comics moved closer to the genre of information comics, comics “designed to educate, inform, or teach the reader something.”6 This is consistent with the way comics made in the Middle East are often viewed, as didactic vessels intended to convey information for young readers. However, when moving towards the more educational information genre, The 99 lost some of the appeal of the original genre.

  • Islam and Science Fiction
     Reply #14 - October 25, 2016, 03:43 PM

    Using superheroes to resolve conflicts feels a lot more sensible than armies andcsuicide bombers.

    When you are a Bear of Very Little Brain, and you Think of Things, you find sometimes that a Thing which seemed very Thingish inside you is quite different when it gets out into the open and has other people looking at it.


    A.A. Milne,

    "We cannot slaughter each other out of the human impasse"
  • Islam and Science Fiction
     Reply #15 - October 25, 2016, 04:10 PM

    I understand scifi to be critically important.  It does two things.  It creates an alternative fantasy world to that created by the religion, of itself very important by actually stating there is more than one way to understand the world, and playing with ideas about what might other worlds and cultures be like.

    Ursula le Guin is an important example.

    The second vector is science - actually discussing science and technology and showing other possibilities.

    Maybe some Islamic Scifi?

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Always_Coming_Home

    There's a good interview with le Guin here: http://www.vice.com/read/ursula-k-le-guin-440-v15n12

    Her novella Paradises Lost deals with religion (in space): http://massimomarinoauthor.com/paradises-lost-ursula-le-guin/

  • Islam and Science Fiction
     Reply #16 - October 25, 2016, 11:46 PM

    I first learned about Islam through Frank Herbert's Dune series, which is a fantastic exploration of prophethood. I think I was in second grade, maybe third.

    Don't let Hitler have the street.
  • Islam and Science Fiction
     Reply #17 - October 26, 2016, 10:14 AM

    Interview with Noura al Noman, a science fiction writer from the UAE. She cites Dune as an influence.

    https://worldsf.wordpress.com/tag/arab-science-fiction/

  • Islam and Science Fiction
     Reply #18 - February 08, 2017, 11:27 AM

    Saladin Ahmed - Clay and Smokeless Fire
  • Islam and Science Fiction
     Reply #19 - May 16, 2017, 08:33 PM

    A letter from Wajahat Ali
  • Islam and Science Fiction
     Reply #20 - September 17, 2017, 06:24 PM

    I first learned about Islam through Frank Herbert's Dune series, which is a fantastic exploration of prophethood. I think I was in second grade, maybe third.


    The Secret History of Dune
  • Islam and Science Fiction
     Reply #21 - September 17, 2017, 09:27 PM

    Lovely, thanks for sharing this!

    Don't let Hitler have the street.
  • 1« Previous thread | Next thread »