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 Topic: Tunisia tensions boil over as teenager dies in riot

 (Read 31057 times)
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  • Tunisia tensions boil over as teenager dies in riot
     OP - December 25, 2010, 12:34 AM

    http://www.google.com/hostednews/afp/article/ALeqM5ho0lZCwZNe5xBDe4Zi0PDG7VWL3g?docId=CNG.66d6de1802a8cf2712e2068cee292844.301

    TUNIS — A Tunisian teenager died on Friday and ten others were injured when protestors attacked a national guard post in a region gripped by tensions over youth joblessness, students and the government said.

    Mohamed Ammari, who was 18, died when he was shot in the chest during a confrontation with security forces in the town of Menzel Bouzaiene, in the central Sidi Bouzid region, said student representative Mohamed Fadhel.

    Several thousand people took part in the protest, which quickly turned violent, said Fadhel.
    Protesters set fire to three police cars, a train locomotive, the local headquarters of the ruling Constitutional Democratic Rally party and a national guard post, whose guards had to seek shelter in a mosque, Fadhel said.

    Police had surrounded the town and were not letting people travel in or out, and many arrests had been made, he said.

    The government confirmed the incident, and said two members of the national guard were in a serious condition with burns.

    "The groups involved in these acts of violence and trouble encircled and attacked a national guard post by throwing fire bombs and stones," a source at the interior ministry told AFP.
    After attempting to disperse the crowd by firing warning shots, security forces opened fire in self defence, said the official.

    "This incident led to one death and two injured among the attackers. Several national guard agents suffered burns, including two who are in a coma," said a government statement published by its information service.

    Tensions have been simmering in the region since the attempted suicide on December 17 of 26-year-old university graduate Mohammed Bouazizi, who was forced to scratch out a living peddling fruit and vegetables because he could not find a job.

    When police confiscated his produce because he did not have the necessary permit, he doused himself in petrol and set himself alight,
    said the Tunisian League for the Defence of Human Rights.

    Bouazizi was transferred to a hospital in capital Tunis with severe burns.
    The incident prompted violent demonstrations in which protestors burned tyres and chanted slogans demanding jobs.

    The government said the violence was isolated and had been exploited by the opposition.
    Tensions heightened on December 22 when another young man, Sidi Bouzid, climbed up an electricity pylon and electrocuted himself on the cables, saying he was fed up with being unemployed.

    The government would not confirm the suicide, but ordered a judicial investigation into the circumstances of his death.

    Development Minister Mohamed Nouri Jouini travelled to Sidi Bouzid on Thursday and announced a new 15-million-dinar (7.5 million euros/10 million dollars) employment programme.

    The opposition Democratic Progressive Party, which does not have a seat in parliament, called on the government to stop arresting young people and instead focus on dialogue and job creation.

    Protests are rare in Tunisia, where the government generally tolerates little in the way of dissent.
  • Re: Tunisia tensions boil over as teenager dies in riot
     Reply #1 - December 25, 2010, 12:36 AM

    There is another demo organised for tomorrow.
  • Re: Tunisia tensions boil over as teenager dies in riot
     Reply #2 - December 25, 2010, 12:43 AM

    the world is on the peak of the volcano

    [13:36] <Fimbles> anything above 7 inches
    [13:37] <Fimbles> is wacko
    [13:37] <Fimbles> see
    [13:37] <Fimbles> you think i'd enjoy anything above 7 inches up my arse?
  • Re: Tunisia tensions boil over as teenager dies in riot
     Reply #3 - December 25, 2010, 01:25 AM

    I was in Tunisia 2 weeks ago and whilst I didn't see any violence I can vouch for the many jobless youngsters wandering aimlessly around with miserable, angry despondent looks on their faces. Sad someone had to lose their life.   

    "The greatest general is not the one who can take the most cities or spill the most blood. The greatest general is the one who can take Heaven and Earth without waging the battle." ~ Sun Tzu

  • Re: Tunisia tensions boil over as teenager dies in riot
     Reply #4 - December 25, 2010, 02:04 AM

    This is the norm in the Arab world. Biggest problem is jobless youth mooching off of their parents.
  • Re: Tunisia tensions boil over as teenager dies in riot
     Reply #5 - December 25, 2010, 02:24 AM

    I was told that in tunisia the govt. is so authoritarian that mosques are only allowed to open at prayer times. anyone know if this is true?
  • Re: Tunisia tensions boil over as teenager dies in riot
     Reply #6 - December 25, 2010, 02:29 AM

    My son-in-law told me that too, also that they watch the mosques and if they see someone going there who doesn't usually attend they will pull them in for questioning. Any signs of trouble or suspicious behaviour and they're arrested.


    "The greatest general is not the one who can take the most cities or spill the most blood. The greatest general is the one who can take Heaven and Earth without waging the battle." ~ Sun Tzu

  • Re: Tunisia tensions boil over as teenager dies in riot
     Reply #7 - December 25, 2010, 02:35 AM

    Yeah thats what I was told, wasnt sure if it was islamist propaganda or actually true. If it is, its sad and wrong. Just more rhetoric for extremists to bitch about.
  • Re: Tunisia tensions boil over as teenager dies in riot
     Reply #8 - December 26, 2010, 11:41 AM

    Sounds awfully familiar.

    Welcome to Benaliland, I suppose.

    He's no friend to the friendless
    And he's the mother of grief
    There's only sorrow for tomorrow
    Surely life is too brief
  • Re: Tunisia tensions boil over as teenager dies in riot
     Reply #9 - January 07, 2011, 01:26 PM

    Quote
    The Pirate Party of Tunisia involved in breaking the Tunisian media blackout on the social unrest happening in many Tunisian cities from December 18th 2010 is facing harsh political and police repression from the undemocratic and corrupt government of Tunisia.

     

    In the course of our last operations our members relayed videos and information on police killing young civilians, on suicide cases related to repression and poverty while riots are happening in the cities of Sidi Bouzid, Siliana and Thala. The Party is also distributing in tunisian universities and schools USB Keys and CD ROMS with installation of the TOR Software needed to circumvent the major wave of cyber censorship happening on the Tuninsian Internet and to protect tunisian Internet users from the hacking the tunisian cyber police is relying on to monitor Internet Users and prevent truth from being relayed online.

     

    On Thursday 2011.01.06,

     

    Slah Eddin Kchouk aka Le Loup

    Azyz Ammami aka Azyoz GM

    Slim Ammamou aka Slim404

     

    three members of the party, were kidnapped by the tunisian political police. No warrant was used. Nobody including teir families is aware of where they are being detained as of now. Their computers have also been confiscated by the police. The three young tunisians hold university degrees and wouldn't be involved in illegal activities.

     

    Tunisia is a country known for its undemocratic and corrupt political regime under the presidence of Zine ElAbidine Ben Ali these past 23 years.

     

    Tunisia is a country where torture while in detention or in prison is very common as reported and documented by Red Cross, Amnesty, HRW and other NGO's.

     

    Pirate Party Tunisia severely condemns the dictatorship of Ben Ali and will engage every possible action to

     

    1. Free its members

    2. Seek international legal course in case of torture and inhumane treatment on its members.

     

    In addition to our members, several other young tunisians were arrested on the same grounds the same day two of them are Hammadi Kaloucha a blogger and cyber activist and Hamada Ben Aoun a 22 year old singer and activist.

     

    We're asking the international community for help to put pressure on the Tunisian Government to release our members.

    http://www.facebook.com/note.php?note_id=184949728200130

    Here's a radio interview with Slim Amamou: http://www.media.theworld.org/pod/tech/slimamamoufull.mp3
  • Re: Tunisia tensions boil over as teenager dies in riot
     Reply #10 - January 07, 2011, 02:03 PM

    Tunisia tensions boil over as teenager dies in riot

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oy_x_WAkRqA

    and translate

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rZ8VJT8khoA

    this to me please

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fpQkHcIJpFg

    Islam Generates Totalitarian system with the support of Islam and its preachers and that is the reason Islamic societies will never live in peace unless half of the country  is dhimmi and they work we eat...

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Re: Tunisia tensions boil over as teenager dies in riot
     Reply #11 - January 07, 2011, 02:04 PM

    Tunisia's bitter cyberwar

    Anonymous has joined with Tunisian activists to call for end to the government's stifling of online dissent.

    http://english.aljazeera.net/indepth/features/2011/01/20111614145839362.html
  • Re: Tunisia tensions boil over as teenager dies in riot
     Reply #12 - January 08, 2011, 03:12 PM

    From the al-bab blog - for some reason I can't post a link


    Tunisia and the Arab house of cards

    It is three weeks today since Mohamed Bouazizi lit the flame in Tunisia. How are we to regard the events since then? How should we characterise them?

    Writing for the Guardian last week, I used the word "uprising", though I can't say I gave it a lot of thought at the time. Based on what I knew then, "uprising" seemed the obvious choice – and it still does if you need to boil it all down to a single word. 

    Yesterday, writing for Le Temps, French journalist Christophe Ayad gave a slightly longer description: "Pas encore une révolution, mais plus qu’une révolte" (Not yet a revolution but more than a revolt.) That, too, seems a fair summary.

    But note the "not yet" bit. What we are seeing now may not be a revolution in itself, but its precursor. Personally, I do think a revolution of sorts is coming and will be surprised if the Ben Ali regime is still in place two or three years hence – for the simple reason that it's incapable of adapting. The protesters' grievances cannot be addressed in any meaningful way while it remains in power, and the clear message from the Tunisian people is that they have had enough.

    This may seem a difficult point for the world outside to grasp – especially the Americans. How do the events in Tunisia mesh with the "forward strategy of freedom" (militarised and heavily overlaid with international politics) that George Bush used to talk about? They don't – and that's their beauty.

    Also, Tunisia isn't a case of Tsvangirai versus Mugabe, Yushchenko versus Yanukovych or Ouattara versus Gbagbo. Organised political parties are irrelevant here, as they are these days in most of the Arab world. Nor is there a charismatic figure that the media can easily latch on to, like Aung San Suu Kyi in Burma or Lech Walesa in the Polish shipyards. In that respect, Tunisia 2011 looks more like Paris 1968, with a random assortment of students and trade unionists in the vanguard plus – to bring it up right to date – a collection of Twitterers, Facebook users and tech-savvy cyber warriors.

    Will it be suppressed like Paris 1968? Somehow, I doubt it. For one thing, the protests are more widespread and the grievances more deeply felt. Others are less sanguine about that. On the Arabist blog, Issandr El Amrani suggests Ben Ali is unlikely to be dislodged without a strong diplomatic push from the EU, and he quotes several articles that are considerably more sceptical than I am.

    But let's turn now to another description. Writing in Foreign Policy, Marc Lynch talks of "Obama's Arab Spring" (with a carefully-placed question mark after it) and links the developments in Tunisia to others in Jordan, Kuwait and Egypt. (We might also include Algeria where there are reports of Tunisian-style disturbances too.)

    Why Obama has to be brought into it, I haven't the faintest idea. The Tunisian protesters aren't doing it for Obama's sake and as far as I'm concerned the longer he keeps his nose out, the better. American support at this stage is more likely to hinder than help, though I wouldn't object to a final nudge from the White House when Ben Ali is on the brink of toppling.

    But, setting Obama aside, consider the idea of an Arab Spring. The sentiments and long pent-up frustrations expressed by Tunisians during the last three weeks are shared, to a very large extent, by Arabs throughout the Middle East. They complain endlessly amongst themselves – and yet they feel there is little, if anything, they can do about it.

    The Tunisian uprising is beginning to change that. It is giving Arabs a glimpse of possibilities that were unimaginable just a month ago. It is profoundly empowering and its psychological effects are not to be underestimated. It is the opposite of the gloom that settled over the Arab world from 1967 onwards and may prove to be no less important.

    Could this mean that we are about to see the crumbling of Arab regimes, one after another, as happened in Eastern Europe? In the short term, probably not. But suppose – and this is by no means an implausible scenario – that as resistance in Tunisia continues the regime's support gradually ebbs away, until eventually Ben Ali's position becomes untenable. Elections follow and the country emerges as a sort of East European style democracy (or better, Latin American style): far from ideal, but something that can be built upon.

    That would be significant for the whole region: regime change of the home-grown variety, not imposed from outside in the way that Iraq was, or from above to give an existing regime the appearance of legitimacy. It would be something unique in the Arab Middle East: democracy by popular demand.

    But could it be replicated in other Arab countries? That is a more difficult question. To a greater or lesser degree, all the Arab regimes present similar problems: a lack of legitimacy, a lack of accountability and transparency, corruption, authoritarianism and elderly leaders (for the most part) governing a frustrated, youthful population.

    Some of the regimes, though, are more resilient than others. While it's tempting to suggest that Egypt could be next – the Mubarak era is plainly coming to an end – the regime itself, unpopular though it is, does have an extensive patronage base that may be enough to keep it in power for some years yet. And the same could be said of several other countries.

    The Tunisian regime, on the other hand, looks especially vulnerable because it has relied so heavily on fear and repression as mechanisms for control. Other Arab regimes do that too, but they also have more subtle and diverse weapons in their armoury. Once the fear barrier is broken in Tunisia though (as seems to be happening), there is little left to protect Ben Ali.

    So, I don't expect Tunisia alone to bring down the entire Arab house of cards. What it will do is intensify the pressure for change that exists already in other countries and encourage people to look to themselves, rather than outside, for solutions. It will also help dispel the idea that the long-surviving regimes we see in place today are permanent fixtures. They are not, and one day they will be history.

    Brian Whitaker, 7 Jan 2011
  • Re: Tunisia tensions boil over as teenager dies in riot
     Reply #13 - January 08, 2011, 04:49 PM

    Tunisian rapper arrested after protest song

    http://arabnews.com/lifestyle/offbeat/article230801.ece

    Quote
    Police arrested 22-year-old Hamada Ben-Amor late Thursday in the Mediterranean Sea coast city of Sfax, Hamdi Ben-Amor told Reuters. "Some 30 plainclothes policemen came to our house to arrest Hamada and took him away without ever telling us where to. When we asked why they were arresting him, they said 'he knows why,'" he said.

    Ben-Amor is known to fans as The General. Last week he released a song on the Internet titled 'President, your people are dying' that talks about the problems of the youth and unemployment. 


    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sd9J4O6z0-c


    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Re: Tunisia tensions boil over as teenager dies in riot
     Reply #14 - January 09, 2011, 12:02 AM

    http://www.twitvid.com/BNOJ6
  • Re: Tunisia tensions boil over as teenager dies in riot
     Reply #15 - January 09, 2011, 12:45 AM

    Never mind Turkey being incorporated into the EU, how about Tunisia?  wacko

    "The greatest general is not the one who can take the most cities or spill the most blood. The greatest general is the one who can take Heaven and Earth without waging the battle." ~ Sun Tzu

  • Re: Tunisia tensions boil over as teenager dies in riot
     Reply #16 - January 09, 2011, 05:38 PM

    There have been riots in Algeria as well :/
  • Re: Tunisia tensions boil over as teenager dies in riot
     Reply #17 - January 09, 2011, 05:53 PM

    11 Killed in Tunisia Protests  say news..

    http://www.voanews.com/english/news/11-Killed-in-Tunisia-Protests-113162684.html



    Quote
    Labor and opposition officials say the latest rioting in a series of protests that started nearly a month ago has killed 11 people and wounded several others.

    The officials said protesters angry with Tunisia's lack of jobs clashed with security forces Saturday and Sunday in the western towns of Kasserine and Thala, near the border with Algeria.  

    The Associated Press also has reported deaths from rioting in Regueb.

    Riots in the North African nation were triggered last month when a 26-year-old university graduate in the central city of Sidi Bouzid who could only find work as a street merchant set himself on fire after authorities confiscated his produce.  The man, Mohammed Bouazizi, later died of his burns.

    Protests are rare in Tunisia, where the government tolerates little dissent.


    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l-WiBIBybKU d


    Stagnated  minds ruling for long time.. unplanned city growth and no Jobs to educated ., If these  things happen in  one of the most progressive Islamic countries., what do we expect in places like Somalia.. and Sudan..

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Re: Tunisia tensions boil over as teenager dies in riot
     Reply #18 - January 11, 2011, 11:40 AM

    From the al-bab blog


    Tunisia: the brink of revolution

    The Tunisian regime was fighting for survival yesterday. Reports and videos of clashes between police and demonstrators circulated on the internet throughout the day – so many that it became difficult to keep track. In some of them civilians were shot and killed – though at this stage it is impossible to even guess at the numbers.

    Perhaps most telling were the scenes, reminiscent of the fall of Saddam Hussein, where pictures of President Ben Ali were openly destroyed in the streets (two examples here and here).

    The EU issued a statement echoing that of the United States, calling for "restraint in the use of force and for the respect of fundamental freedoms", as did the UN secretary-general, Ban Ki-moon.

    At 4pm local time, Ben Ali appeared on television and on this occasion his speech was not interrupted by a telephone call. It's a  subjective assessment, but I felt from his demeanour that he looked more than a little rattled. Unlike his speech two weeks ago, where he was seated presidentially behind a gigantic desk, this time he decided to stand – as if ready to dash out of room at a moment's notice.

    He began with some familiar bluster, deriding (and insulting) the thousands of protesters by blaming "hostile elements in the pay of foreigners, who have sold their souls to extremism and terrorism, manipulated from outside the country". This was so obviously untrue that, from then on, most of his audience probably stopped listening.

    He followed this up with an implausible-sounding promise to create 300,000 new jobs within two years, and to hold a "national conference" next month (which nobody apart from the regime's most diehard supporters is likely to attend).

    Clutching weakly for other things to offer, he announced "a new impetus to regional newspapers devoting space daily to all governorates of the country" and said the "people's representatives" would be asked to "intensify their periodic contacts with citizens".

    He ended, very oddly, by thanking his "dear brother", Colonel Gadafy, for support and appeared to suggest that anyone who is unhappy with life in Tunisia should go to Libya. The situation must be truly dire if the only world leader you can publicly thank for support is Gadafy.

    Following his speech, in which Ben Ali also lectured Tunisians on the importance the regime attaches to education, the education ministry demonstrated the regime's commitment by announcing that schools and universities would be closed until further notice.

    Reports on Twitter overnight say access to Facebook within Tunisia has now been blocked in its entirety. Previously the regime had been blocking individual Facebook pages. If true, this is another blunder. Not only will it stir up further anger among Tunisia's youth; it will also be seen as a direct snub to the US, the EU and the UN, who have all made a specific point about the need for free expression.

    Maybe the next step is martial law but, as of yesterday, all the signs point to the regime losing control. More civilian deaths mean more funerals, and more funerals mean more protests. And keeping kids out of school, without even Facebook to keep them occupied, is also a recipe for trouble.

    Maybe Ben Ali will continue urging his security forces to redouble their efforts, but cooler heads in the police and army ought to be telling him (if they are not doing so already) that there is now only one action that can quell the riots: the departure of Ben Ali himself.

    Brian Whitaker, 11 Jan 2011

  • Re: Tunisia tensions boil over as teenager dies in riot
     Reply #19 - January 11, 2011, 11:50 AM

    From the LA Times


    Tunisia: Schools shuttered as protests continue

    Riots and protests continued Monday across Tunisia with opposition sources saying as many as 24 people have been killed in clashes between police and youths angry over unemployment and a lack of political freedom under the reign of President Zine el Abidine ben Ali, who took to the airwaves in an attempt to calm the nation.

    In an "I-feel-your-pain" gambit, he promised to create 300,000 new jobs. But he also took a hard line against the protesters, blaming them for the violence.

    "The events were violent, sometimes bloody, and caused the death of civilians and wounded several members of the security forces," he said. "The events were the work of masked gangs that attacked at night government buildings and even civilians inside their homes in a terrorist act that cannot be overlooked."

    Few bought Ben Ali's rhetoric. Security forces continued to be deployed in full force across the country. One local trade union source said that "the Tunisian authorities decisively deployed troops that were stationed in front of a number of government organization in the town of Thela" after a gathering by protesters and a strike by teachers to protest the shootings. 

    In response to huge rallies by college and high school students around the country, Ben Ali's education minister took the extraordinary step of cancelling all classes and shuttering all campuses, according to the country's official TAP news agency.
     
    The government says only 14 people have been killed in weeks of violence across the country.

    Tunisia's worst political violence in decades erupted after a 26-year-old street vendor named Mohamed Bouazizi attempted to commit suicide by publicly setting himself on fire because he could not find a job.

    Bouazizi was angered after he was barred from delivering a complaint to the officials of the region after the confiscation of his goods by police for not having a proper vendor license. 

    Critics of the government say it is corrupt and uses the threat of Islamists and the need for foreign investment as pretexts for repressive domestic policies that violate basic civil rights. The harsh reaction of the security forces against protesters has further angered the public.

    On Sunday, a group of opposition parties called for an immediate cessation of the security forces practice of opening fire on civilians and demanded that police and soldiers who do so be taken to court. The Tunisian League of Human Rights also called for the right to assemble and to demonstrate peacefully.

    Tunisia's Interior Ministry issued a statement insisting that security forces were acting in self-defense.

    France, which has cozy relations with Ben Ali, tepidly spoke out against the violence, voicing regret for what was happening in Tunisia, calling for calm and arguing that only dialogue could solve the country's economic and social problems.

    "We regret the violence which killed the victims and we call for calm," Foreign Ministry spokesman Bernard Valero said of France's former colonial ward. 


    Soufiane Chourabi in Tunis

  • Re: Tunisia tensions boil over as teenager dies in riot
     Reply #20 - January 11, 2011, 12:35 PM

    This was posted on a thread on the urban75 forum if anyone's interested

    Salam everyone, I am a tunisian living in london, as a matter of fact there is no tunisian organisation in london if we don't consider the gathering of some individuals who got political asylium in the 90's as an organistaion though they have all means and experience

    I with few other tunisian activists and very amateur ones as well founded the tunisia solidarity campaign to inform in particular and centralize the support of the uk based tunisian diaspora.. we just created the website http://tunisiasolidarity.wordpress.com/ so feeds will be more and more regular as we figure new ways to translate and pass the info efficiently for those interested.

    If anyone has questions about what has been happening feel free to contact me at touneyssa@gmail.com
  • Re: Tunisia tensions boil over as teenager dies in riot
     Reply #21 - January 11, 2011, 01:21 PM

    Police shoot demonstrators in Tunisia

    http://libcom.org/blog/police-shoot-demonstrators-tunisia-11012011
  • Re: Tunisia tensions boil over as teenager dies in riot
     Reply #22 - January 11, 2011, 02:46 PM

    Ok zeca, I don't know who you are but maybe you could explain to me how this could happen:

    A family member of mine is a Tunisian and lives there. The night before last I was talking to him on Windows Live Messenger.  Please note I do not have a webcam connected to my computer and I emphasise this point.  Earlier in the evening I had sent to him by private ftp one of the riot videos off youtube which he could not access.  Although Tunisia has now blocked all access to Facebook for their citizens, 2 days ago he still had access to his facebook and he (wisely or not  Huh? ) posted one of these videos for all to see. 

    Anyway, suddenly while we were texting each other I saw him appear in the messenger window as if I had accepted an invitation to view webcam, yet I did not receive any such invitation or accept one.   He assured me that while he did have his webcam connected he had not sent me any invitation to view and couldn't believe what he was also seeing.  He said his messenger window was also showing that I have a webcam and that whilst he couldn't see me (impossible seeing as I didn't have a webcam connected) what he could see was my desktop and exactly what I was doing just as if he had remote access, although he had no control over the desktop. All he could do was watch what I was doing.   I initially thought he must be mistaken and was having a laugh although he didn't look as if he was joking. He then swung his webcam to show me his screen and I could clearly see that he was right and he could see all I was doing.  wacko wacko wacko

    I immediately shut down my computer, rebooted etc.  I opened messenger with him again and the same thing happened. I have all the necessary computer security possible in place and I'm not naive around computers.

    Can anybody please tell me how the hell this was possible?  finmad


    "The greatest general is not the one who can take the most cities or spill the most blood. The greatest general is the one who can take Heaven and Earth without waging the battle." ~ Sun Tzu

  • Re: Tunisia tensions boil over as teenager dies in riot
     Reply #23 - January 11, 2011, 02:52 PM

    Its not possible, unless you have a webcam connected or if he is showing you old footage & winding you up

    My Book     news002       
    My Blog  pccoffee
  • Re: Tunisia tensions boil over as teenager dies in riot
     Reply #24 - January 11, 2011, 02:57 PM

    Seriously IsLame he was not winding me up.  I even changed what I had open on my desktop etc and it changed to the same in his window too.

    "The greatest general is not the one who can take the most cities or spill the most blood. The greatest general is the one who can take Heaven and Earth without waging the battle." ~ Sun Tzu

  • Re: Tunisia tensions boil over as teenager dies in riot
     Reply #25 - January 11, 2011, 03:03 PM

    The only other option is you are being spied on by the British Government - possibly due to your muslim connections in foreign lands

    My Book     news002       
    My Blog  pccoffee
  • Re: Tunisia tensions boil over as teenager dies in riot
     Reply #26 - January 11, 2011, 03:06 PM

    I was thinking the same by the Tunisian government rather than the British, in the sense that they are watching him and somehow through the messenger interface, because he had a direct connection with me, they manipulated this somehow?  Huh?

    "The greatest general is not the one who can take the most cities or spill the most blood. The greatest general is the one who can take Heaven and Earth without waging the battle." ~ Sun Tzu

  • Re: Tunisia tensions boil over as teenager dies in riot
     Reply #27 - January 11, 2011, 03:08 PM

    Somebody would still need to get access to your house & put a pinhole camera in your room though

    My Book     news002       
    My Blog  pccoffee
  • Re: Tunisia tensions boil over as teenager dies in riot
     Reply #28 - January 11, 2011, 03:10 PM

    and if theyve done that they probably are recoding each one of your keystrokes too using a keylogger

    My Book     news002       
    My Blog  pccoffee
  • Re: Tunisia tensions boil over as teenager dies in riot
     Reply #29 - January 11, 2011, 03:11 PM

    is he using the famous chinese QQ messanger? That can allow him to control your screen even if you have no webcam. It is like screen shots and it is called remote access!



    ETA: by QQ he can see your screen even without webcam. He can move your cursor too!  dance But I think you have to give him permission, invitation accept and so forth. maybe by mistake you pressed enter right before you see the invitation message and you clicked OK!

    ...
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