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Theme Changer

 Topic: Urdu lessons

 (Read 36042 times)
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  • Re: Urdu lessons
     Reply #30 - March 25, 2011, 09:05 AM

    Well I didn't use google translate for the above, i tried to sound it out  grin12
    Idk the rules for reading and writing urdu. I'll get my mom to teach me.

    "If intelligence is feminine... I would want that mine would, in a resolute movement, come to resemble an impious woman."
  • Re: Urdu lessons
     Reply #31 - March 25, 2011, 05:46 PM

    پہلے گوگل ٹرانصلت میں پہلے ڈبے میں اردو کو منتخب کرو - دوسرے ڈبے کو ایسے ہی رہنے دو - اب انگریزی می رومن اردو کو لکھنا شروع کرو - ایک ایک لفظ کے بعدخالی جگہ چھوڑتی جاؤ ؛ وہ لفظ اردو بنتا جاتے گا  

    Admin of following facebook pages and groups:
    Islam's Last Stand (page)
    Islam's Last Stand (group)
    and many others...
  • Re: Urdu lessons
     Reply #32 - March 25, 2011, 05:50 PM

    You know it can't be true what you say about Arabic, muddy. Their whole Aliphabet is made of consonants, so Arabic has at least six ds in my estimate. Anyway, Urdu is too easy, try learning Finnish instead. Here's a clip of a related language:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LVRmDFMq9Xc


    true that..

    Admin of following facebook pages and groups:
    Islam's Last Stand (page)
    Islam's Last Stand (group)
    and many others...
  • Re: Urdu lessons
     Reply #33 - September 04, 2011, 01:36 AM

    Urdu should be confined to the four walls of a man's bedroom. To venture beyond it is the height of obscenity 'cause it reminds one of the soft Urdu words a lover used to whisper in my ear in the heated passion of nocturnal entanglements. Not a single word penetrated to my higher cerebral faculties, but how blissfully soothing, how titillating, how romantic. Come to think of it, it wasn't quite distinctly audible words so much as an explosive mix of gasps, yelps and laboured breathing in a delightful Urdu inflection.  

    Exotic things to the effect of: Kute liche ho chublo.

    How, oh, how I wish I could discern its meaning. Please shut down this thread my brothers. It's arousing me.

    Barakallahu Feek.


    That was... so hot, considering I've had major crushes on a couple of Pakistani girls.

    Allat taught me this one: "Bhar mein jao, salay." parrot


    What does that mean? And what does the thing MAB said mean, if anything?

    قل للمليحة في الخمار الأسود
    مـاذا فـعــلت بــناسـك مـتـعـبد

    قـد كـان شـمّر لــلـصلاة ثـيابه
    حتى خـطرت له بباب المسجد

    ردي عليـه صـلاتـه وصيـامــه
    لا تـقــتـلــيه بـحـق ديــن محمد
  • Re: Urdu lessons
     Reply #34 - September 04, 2011, 04:25 AM

    I learned hindi from movies and urdu is similar, I learned that pretty much by force cos when I was a kid all the 'kitaab's' were in urdu

    I love both languages. You can say something in hindi that sounds so profound but doesn't have the same umph in english. Also, I feel very theatrical when speaking in hindi.

    Unfortunately I'm a little rusty. Hopefully when work eases up I'm going to visit India for a month or two so I'm sure I'll pick up the fluency again. The only problem is (embarrassingly) I speak hindi/urdu like a 'goree' and have an english accent.

    Why do people say you're a wannabe goree when you have these western traits, it's pretty silly when you ARE western (pre-empting attack!)- I was born and raised in the UK by parents and extended family that only spoke english- it's a miracle I speak hindi at all! Even my grandma understood/spoke english. Therefore I have an english accent  Tongue
  • Re: Urdu lessons
     Reply #35 - September 04, 2011, 06:37 AM

    Quote
    Allat taught me this one: "Bhar mein jao, salay."


    bhar[actually the 'r' sounds like a distorted 'd']=  a flood

    'bhar mein jao'  would literally mean that it's wished that you are swept away by a flood

    so freely translated this would mean "GO TO HELL! ,FUCKER!"



    The World is my country, all mankind are my brethren, and to do good is my religion.
                                   Thomas Paine

    Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored !- Aldous Huxley
  • Re: Urdu lessons
     Reply #36 - September 04, 2011, 07:00 AM

    I learned hindi from movies and urdu is similar, I learned that pretty much by force cos when I was a kid all the 'kitaab's' were in urdu

    I love both languages. You can say something in hindi that sounds so profound but doesn't have the same umph in english. Also, I feel very theatrical when speaking in hindi.

    Unfortunately I'm a little rusty. Hopefully when work eases up I'm going to visit India for a month or two so I'm sure I'll pick up the fluency again. The only problem is (embarrassingly) I speak hindi/urdu like a 'goree' and have an english accent.

    Why do people say you're a wannabe goree when you have these western traits, it's pretty silly when you ARE western (pre-empting attack!)- I was born and raised in the UK by parents and extended family that only spoke english- it's a miracle I speak hindi at all! Even my grandma understood/spoke english. Therefore I have an english accent  Tongue


    goree o ya khali
    sirf zaroori hai aap ko hona
    ek dilwali!
    na gabraiye apni angrezi ucchar se,
    pyar ke zuban ko nahin hoti  hai ahamiyat
    Lafzon ka ucchar!



    The World is my country, all mankind are my brethren, and to do good is my religion.
                                   Thomas Paine

    Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored !- Aldous Huxley
  • Re: Urdu lessons
     Reply #37 - September 07, 2011, 02:04 AM

    Any of you guys fluent in punjabi? I heard this sort of song thing in Pakistan, its rather emotional  Tongue I can understand parts of it but not all........
  • Re: Urdu lessons
     Reply #38 - September 07, 2011, 02:53 AM

    Any of you guys fluent in punjabi? I heard this sort of song thing in Pakistan, its rather emotional  Tongue I can understand parts of it but not all........


    I can probably help... post a link or something
  • Re: Urdu lessons
     Reply #39 - September 07, 2011, 05:14 PM

    Thanks  Smiley Just the last bit I don't understand from 8:08 onwards.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f4NPyzEtINQ
  • Re: Urdu lessons
     Reply #40 - September 10, 2011, 01:08 PM

    that is difficult to translate or even hear properly for me because i am a very slow punjabi speaker.. my dad couldve translated pretty easily though... this is a sad song... here's what i think he means.

    tere wangon mattha chum chum, maa kisse vee gal nal lawna naee
    after having kissed your forehead/having my forehead kissed by you so many times, i cannot enjoy any other action


    tu naee rayee hun, tere gar da mein banna kadday parawna naee
    now that you are not here, i shall never be a patron to your house again

    raee o gar aj chhut gya mai thoon, wai aundee saan jitthey chawaan naal
    when you left i lost the breath that comes with your love

    maa maree te rishtay ee muk gae, khed see maan diyaan sawaan naal
    when mom died, every relationship that thrived under the shade of my mother, ended

    maa mai hun naee pay ke auna, pay ke hunday maawaan naal
    i think this means she won't get married now since people can only marry happily if their mother is around

    i always thought 'pay kay awna' meant to eat or enjoy to one's heart's content.

    this is probably a horrible translation.
  • Re: Urdu lessons
     Reply #41 - September 10, 2011, 08:58 PM

    Thanks a lot!  Smiley
  • Urdu lessons
     Reply #42 - September 04, 2014, 05:59 PM

    A decent resource:  http://learnurdulanguage.com/urdureadingwriting_5.html

    My mind runs, I can never catch it even if I get a head start.
  • Urdu lessons
     Reply #43 - September 04, 2014, 07:46 PM

    Allat taught me this one: "Bhar mein jao, salay." parrot

       


     Cheesy      Oz reminds me of those teens back in middle school who want to learn insults in different languages   

    In my opinion a life without curiosity is not a life worth living
  • Urdu lessons
     Reply #44 - February 22, 2015, 07:57 PM

    Lesson One

    Urdu is conventionally written in a script called Nastaliq, which literally means  "the hanging Naskh". The script was formally employed to write Persian but Persian is now conventionally written in the Naskh script.

    The principal difference between the Naskh and Nastaliq scripts is that words in Naskh run along a line, whereas words in Nastaliq slant diagonally. The Nastaliq script is cursive and runs from right to left.

    There are 35 characters, each of which has a name in addition to its pronunciation. Most of the characters are made up of a linear portion together with dots, or in the case of three characters, a symbol that resembles a small "flat" symbol in music.

    Most, but not all, of the characters connect to both the preceding and following character. There are four characters that do not connect to the following character. Coincidentally, they happen to be the four characters that make up the word "Urdu":

    اردو

    From right to left, they are:

    alif , re, dal, vao.



    That is lesson one completed, stay tuned for lesson two (whenever I can be bothered).

    My mind runs, I can never catch it even if I get a head start.
  • Urdu lessons
     Reply #45 - February 22, 2015, 08:00 PM

    Interesting. So Urdu has more letters than the Arabic alphabet?

    You are the Universe, Expressing itself as a Human for a little while- Eckhart Tolle
  • Urdu lessons
     Reply #46 - February 22, 2015, 08:05 PM

    Yep

    My mind runs, I can never catch it even if I get a head start.
  • Urdu lessons
     Reply #47 - February 22, 2015, 08:17 PM


    ا ر ڈ و




    Why does the dal have a 'tah on top of it? Cheesy

    You are the Universe, Expressing itself as a Human for a little while- Eckhart Tolle
  • Urdu lessons
     Reply #48 - February 22, 2015, 08:19 PM


    د: Dal with soft ‘d’

    ڈ : Dal with hard ‘D’

    My mind runs, I can never catch it even if I get a head start.
  • Urdu lessons
     Reply #49 - February 22, 2015, 08:43 PM

    Ahhhh, makes sense now! Does this apply to any other letters?

    You are the Universe, Expressing itself as a Human for a little while- Eckhart Tolle
  • Urdu lessons
     Reply #50 - February 22, 2015, 09:05 PM

    ت : Tay; with soft ‘t’
    ٹ : Tay; with hard ‘T’

    ر : Ray

    ڑ : aRay (hard retroflex)


    My mind runs, I can never catch it even if I get a head start.
  • Urdu lessons
     Reply #51 - February 22, 2015, 09:12 PM

    Why does the dal have a 'tah on top of it? Cheesy


    Actually, ignore my initial spelling of Urdu. I've thought about it, it should be spelt with the dental d.
    Though I think a more accurate "d" sound would be a dal with a "pesh" on top of it, but we can get to that later.

    My mind runs, I can never catch it even if I get a head start.
  • Urdu lessons
     Reply #52 - February 22, 2015, 09:41 PM

    I think whoever was supposed to teach you Urdu is gonna be jelly Ishtar90 Tongue

    One only acquires wisdom when one sets the heart and mind open to new ideas.

    Chat: http://client01.chat.mibbit.com/#ex-muslims
  • Urdu lessons
     Reply #53 - February 22, 2015, 09:42 PM

    Teach her PhysMath, teach her. Teacher PhysMath, teach her.

    My mind runs, I can never catch it even if I get a head start.
  • Urdu lessons
     Reply #54 - February 22, 2015, 09:43 PM

     Cheesy Cheesy Cheesy Cheesy Oh you boys

    You are the Universe, Expressing itself as a Human for a little while- Eckhart Tolle
  • Urdu lessons
     Reply #55 - February 22, 2015, 09:44 PM

    I shall, soon! cool2

    One only acquires wisdom when one sets the heart and mind open to new ideas.

    Chat: http://client01.chat.mibbit.com/#ex-muslims
  • Urdu lessons
     Reply #56 - February 22, 2015, 09:46 PM

     001_wub

    You are the Universe, Expressing itself as a Human for a little while- Eckhart Tolle
  • Urdu lessons
     Reply #57 - February 22, 2015, 09:48 PM

    So bored, anyone want Lesson 2?

    My mind runs, I can never catch it even if I get a head start.
  • Urdu lessons
     Reply #58 - February 22, 2015, 09:49 PM

    You could join us on the chat? Tongue

    But go ahead Cheesy

    You are the Universe, Expressing itself as a Human for a little while- Eckhart Tolle
  • Urdu lessons
     Reply #59 - February 22, 2015, 10:05 PM

    Lesson Two

    As mentioned in lesson one, Nastaliq is a cursive script. Most, but not all, of the characters in Nastaliq connect to both the preceding and the following character. This means that characters that connect on both sides have four forms, depending on the position they occupy in a word. That is to say, they have an initial form, a medial form, a final form and an independent form. Let's take a look at the second letter of the alphabet bay, which represents the consonant b.

    Bay:
    ب

    Final form:  ـب
    Medial form: ـبـ
    Initial form: بـ
    Isolated form: ب

    Characters that only connect to the preceding character have only two forms (an independent/initial and a medial/final form)

    There are ten vowels in Urdu: three short vowels and seven long vowels. The three short vowels, a , i and u are not represented by characters in the script. The other seven long vowels are represented by only three of the characters.

    To help identify when one of the three short vowels is to be pronounced, there exist three small symbols that may be employed. In the same way that the characters have names, these small symbols also have names. Two of them are written above the characters and one is written below characters:


    zabar (written above the character) = a



    zer (written below the character) = i



    pesh(written above the character) = u






    My mind runs, I can never catch it even if I get a head start.
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