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Theme Changer

 Topic: Afghanistan

 (Read 11099 times)
  • 12 Next page « Previous thread | Next thread »
  • Afghanistan
     OP - June 29, 2010, 09:03 PM

    I've said it before and I'll say it again it is an unwinnable war.

    We should get out now! Leave them to it.

    Yes it will be horrible - but sadly there is no way we can change things.
  • Re: Afghanistan
     Reply #1 - June 30, 2010, 12:42 AM

    Just the other day the UK government pressed for starting talks with the Taliban. This is the same Taliban that was harboring Al-Qaeda, beating women, and blowing up Buddha statues. It's not like they became moderate all of the sudden. So they British Government not only realized but also admitted that this is an unwinnable war.
  • Re: Afghanistan
     Reply #2 - June 30, 2010, 01:21 AM

    A little off topic, but here are some pictures of Kabul (University) in the 70s, although it doesn't represent Afghanistan or Kabul as a whole:








  • Re: Afghanistan
     Reply #3 - June 30, 2010, 01:32 AM

    kb.. is that your family?  very beautiful Smiley

    the pic could be anywhere in the world.  One would never guess that is afghanistan.
    Talking about going ass backwards!  Such a shame!

    When one door of happiness closes, another opens; but often we look so long at the closed door that we do not see the one which has been opened for us.
    Helen Keller
  • Re: Afghanistan
     Reply #4 - June 30, 2010, 01:37 AM

    Uh no, they are not my family lol. These are just some pictures I remember finding on an Afghan Forum.
  • Re: Afghanistan
     Reply #5 - June 30, 2010, 01:44 AM

    I should have gone to afghanistan in the 70s/80s.  Way too crazy in this era to visit :(

    When one door of happiness closes, another opens; but often we look so long at the closed door that we do not see the one which has been opened for us.
    Helen Keller
  • Re: Afghanistan
     Reply #6 - June 30, 2010, 01:48 AM

    Between 1979-1989 you woulda been smack dab in the middle of the Soviet-Afghan War, JNT.

    I wish I had gone back then too (and was older) to have fought for the PDPA/Soviets.  Smiley

    fuck you
  • Re: Afghanistan
     Reply #7 - June 30, 2010, 02:05 AM

    where i was in 84 was pretty bad too.  Also had the beirut thing happen before i got there
    (they bombed the US marine barracks there)  there was some shit going on in syria (when isnt
    there?) and then the mess i was stuck in the middle of  Cry

    Q.... IF there is a big Al... I REFUSE to believe the torture/murder etc, is PLEASING TO HIM!!!
    So on that note... i am posting a song i sang ALOT in and after 1984   Cry  Cry  Cry

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xT4Kw3A0pHI

    When one door of happiness closes, another opens; but often we look so long at the closed door that we do not see the one which has been opened for us.
    Helen Keller
  • Re: Afghanistan
     Reply #8 - June 30, 2010, 02:05 AM

    I once came across a similar set of photos on an Iraqi forum and a I was very surprised. They were photos from around Baghdad in the 70s specially at universities, cafe, and restaurants.  I asked my father and mother and they told me that when they were in uni less than 5% of females students wore hijab. Miniskirts were the norm. And apparently we had a very vibrant disco scene. IIRC, ABBA once performed in Baghdad.

    So I'm not surprised at all by these photos. From the end of WWII until the fall of the Soviet Unions the most influential political ideologies in most the of the Middle East were nationalism and socialism. Now they've been replaced by capitalism and religion.
  • Re: Afghanistan
     Reply #9 - June 30, 2010, 02:07 AM

    If you haven't seen 'Rethink Afghanistan', you need to watch it.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C3I6SxMpivo
  • Re: Afghanistan
     Reply #10 - June 30, 2010, 02:17 AM

    IIRC, ABBA once performed in Baghdad.


    And you regard this as a GOOD thing?

    fuck you
  • Re: Afghanistan
     Reply #11 - June 30, 2010, 02:21 AM

    My mother and aunts do ! They love ABBA. I can't stand them. Except for the song Fernando.
  • Re: Afghanistan
     Reply #12 - June 30, 2010, 02:22 AM

    The Islamists are against ABBA, right?

    fuck you
  • Re: Afghanistan
     Reply #13 - June 30, 2010, 02:25 AM

    What are you talking about?

    The Islamists love hippie Swedes.  Afro
  • Re: Afghanistan
     Reply #14 - June 30, 2010, 02:25 AM

    Abood..  having recently had the epiphany that god doesnt exist, i wonder how to deal with the
    burdens i have for the children.  both as an xian and muslim, i prayed, sometimes for hours on end
    for the innocent little ones around the world, who seem to suffer the most.  

    Now i dont know what to do.  how do i reckon with these burdens, and i wonder if anything to be
    done is possible at all.  My heart breaks a million times over for the chidren of war    Cry

    When one door of happiness closes, another opens; but often we look so long at the closed door that we do not see the one which has been opened for us.
    Helen Keller
  • Re: Afghanistan
     Reply #15 - June 30, 2010, 02:26 AM

    What are you talking about?

    The Islamists love hippie Swedes.  Afro


    Good, then I still oppose the Islamists.

    fuck you
  • Re: Afghanistan
     Reply #16 - June 30, 2010, 02:57 AM

    I dont know what will happen in Afghanistan sometimes I think i'm glad America is there to help them but a lot of times I think maybe it will just be effortless.  I remember when I was a kid we used to watch  Bollywood movies and they would do a lot of scenes/music videos in Afganistan.  I remember many of Indians would go on tourist trips to see the Bamiyan statues because there was a lot of our culture/religion in that land ofcourse it went down significantly.

     My heart breaks a million times over for the chidren of war    Cry

    +1

    That's the worst part in any war...affects is has on children.  Then they grow up with so many psychological, physical problems their whole lives it's just not fair.

    "A good man is so hard to find but a hard man is so good to find"
  • Re: Afghanistan
     Reply #17 - June 30, 2010, 03:09 AM

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qh2sWSVRrmo

    fuck you
  • Re: Afghanistan
     Reply #18 - June 30, 2010, 05:39 AM

    I agree. I think they should take the troops out of Afghanistan. There is no progress being made there and more people are just dying. Take out the soldiers and let the Afghans solve this problem on their own.

    "The more I study religions the more I am convinced that man never worshiped anything but himself."
    ~Sir Richard Francis Burton

    "I think religion is just like smoking: Both invented by people, addictive, harmful, and kills!"
    ~RIBS
  • Re: Afghanistan
     Reply #19 - June 30, 2010, 06:00 AM

    They cant win this war, and they wont ever admit that they were the ones who fucked it up in the first place.

    Pakistan Zindabad? ya Pakistan sey Zinda bhaag?

    Long Live Pakistan? Or run with your lives from Pakistan?
  • Re: Afghanistan
     Reply #20 - June 30, 2010, 09:58 AM

    I've said it before and I'll say it again it is an unwinnable war.

    We should get out now! Leave them to it.

    Yes it will be horrible - but sadly there is no way we can change things.


    What do you think will happen when the troops pull out?

    "By the One in Whose Hand my soul is, were you not to commit sins, Allah would replace you with a people who would commit sins and then seek forgiveness from Allah; and Allah would forgive them." [Saheeh Muslim]

    "Wherever you are, death will find you, Even in the looming tower."
    - Quran 4:78
  • Re: Afghanistan
     Reply #21 - June 30, 2010, 10:09 AM

    I feel for all the women and girls of Afghanistan.  For me I just wanted the war to save them, but it never did.  I didn't give a shit about America's need for revenge, I just thought somehow if the Taliban were wiped out, then maybe life could improve for the females.  Not to say the men have it easy, but they have it easier.

    None of that has happened, the situation sounds worse not better.  The government is just as shitty and religious as it was before.  Much as I still wish keeping the troops there will bring about this promised freedom, truth is it doesn't appear this war will do anything.


    Inhale the good shit, exhale the bullshit.
  • Re: Afghanistan
     Reply #22 - June 30, 2010, 11:32 AM

    What do you think will happen when the troops pull out?

    Their wives will not become pregnant.

     dance
  • Re: Afghanistan
     Reply #23 - June 30, 2010, 11:42 AM

     Cheesy
  • Re: Afghanistan
     Reply #24 - June 30, 2010, 11:45 AM

    Their wives will not become pregnant.

     dance


    Lmao 

    Inhale the good shit, exhale the bullshit.
  • Re: Afghanistan
     Reply #25 - June 30, 2010, 01:01 PM


    This is improvement I think

    Quote
    Marwa's determination appears to be a trend. Prior to the 2001 U.S.-led invasion that ousted the Taliban, virtually no girls were enrolled in school. Today, a record 2.5 million girls are enrolled in grades first through 12th, according to UNICEF, the United Nations' children's fund. That's up from 839,000 in 2002.

    "The demand for girls education has increased and is increasing," says Mohammad Sediq Patman, deputy minister for academic affairs at the Education Ministry in Kabul. "We receive letters from very remote districts. They used to consider girls schools a blasphemy. But today they ask for girls education."

    Some credit the increase in enrollment not just with the removal of the Taliban but a change in attitudes among Afghans.

    "When I travel to the villages, even the Kuchi people (Afghan nomads) who never sent their girls to school, they ask me to build a school for their girls," says Kunduz provincial Gov. Mohammad Omar.

    After a boys school opened in eastern Nangarhar province, deputy education minister Patman says, villagers immediately started lobbying for a girls school.

    Patman and others attribute the growing tolerance for girls schools to Afghans' exposure to the outside world (millions went into exile during three decades of warfare) and their weariness of backward attitudes and poverty.

    Kunduz ninth-grader Marwa Mahmoodi, who intends to become "a very good doctor," says her mother pushed her to get an education, telling her: "I don't want you to have the life I have, where I am dependent on your father."

    "They bring their daughters and sisters to school," says Abdul Muqim Halimi, Kunduz's former provincial education director. "They are the same people, but they have changed. They are no longer yesterday's people."


    http://www.usatoday.com/news/world/afghanistan/2010-05-27-afghanistan-girls_N.htm

    Like a compass needle that points north, a man?s accusing finger always finds a woman. Always.

    Khaled Hosseini - A thousand splendid suns.
  • Re: Afghanistan
     Reply #26 - June 30, 2010, 01:12 PM

    Yeah, but then there's shit like this:

    Quote
    Meet Sorarya and you meet "attitude".

    It has something to do with the way she wears her red tunic and trousers, her short cropped black leather jacket, and the way she chews gum and rolls her eyes.

    "What are you here for?" I ask as we sit in a makeshift beauty parlour, surrounded by a group of Afghan women in less flamboyant attire.

    "Should I tell her?" she asks the other women with a mischievous grin.

    "Bad character," she says after a moment's hesitation. She suppresses a giggle then doubles over with laughter. Everyone giggles with her.

    Sorarya doesn't explain what that means. But almost every woman in this room has been accused of "bad character" of one kind or another.

    Missing school

    We are sitting in Badam Bagh, or Almond Garden, Afghanistan's only prison for women in the capital Kabul.

    The prison is a window on a world where, outside these walls, women are constantly judged against a standard that makes many of their stories difficult to fathom.

    Sixteen-year-old Sabera, with a pretty yellow head scarf, frets that she is missing school.

    "I was about to get engaged, and the boy came to ask me himself, before sending his parents. A lady in our neighbourhood saw us, and called the police," she explains.

    She was sentenced to three years but, in an act of mercy, it was shortened to 18 months.

    Fellow inmate Aziza was accused of running away from her husband. She says she was acquitted two months ago, but still languishes in prison.

    A senior official in Afghanistan's Ministry for Women's Affairs told a recent UN workshop that about half of Afghanistan's 476 women prisoners were detained for "moral crimes".

    That includes everything from running away from home, refusing to marry, marrying without their family's wishes, and "attempted adultery".

    "In many cases women run away because they can't bear the domestic violence and then they are picked up and taken into custody for a long time," explains Nader Nadery, a commissioner at Afghanistan's Independent Human Rights Commission.

    'What's my crime?'

    The legal system further tips the scales of justice.

    "Running away is not defined in any penal code," says Mr Nadery. "If there is no provision in law, they refer to Islamic Sharia law and this gives them an open hand."

    Mastura is a waif of a woman, 19 years old, and accused of adultery by her husband.

    "I was three months pregnant, and he said the child wasn't his and he kicked me out of our house," she says, cradling her infant son as she perches on the edge of a metal bed in her communal cell.

    "My mother lodged a complaint against him but the government locked me up."

    All the women in her cell, from teenagers to an 80-year-old woman veiled in black, listen quietly as she tells us her story. But they must know it by now.

    "Every time I think about it, I cry, and I say to myself, 'What crime have I committed that I should be in prison?'" wails Mastura. She appeals to President Hamid Karzai to allow all the women to go home.

    Mastura named her son Izzatullah, which means "God's honour". For an alleged crime linked to his mother's "honour", he's been born a prisoner.

    About 40 other young children also share their mother's fate, living in Badam Bagh.

    They sit on tiny plastic chairs watching television in a room filled with stuffed toys, and bright colours.

    It could be a kindergarten anywhere - except the toddlers are minded by a woman who has been convicted of murdering her stepson. She insists she is innocent.

    Prison authorities say children are taken away to a boarding school after the age of five.

    Handicraft classes

    Badam Bagh, home to 147 women and children, was opened two years ago and markedly improved prison conditions for women.

    They used to be held at Afghanistan's most notorious jail, Pul-e-Charki, which now has some 5,000 men.

    A separate facility was built, helped by foreign aid, after concern grew about women's conditions. An Afghan parliamentary report had highlighted cases of women being raped inside prison walls.

    The new centre, a three-storey white building, is bright and clean, and women move freely between their cells and communal areas. Handicrafts allow them to earn some money, and computer classes teach new skills.

    "Abuse and arbitrary detention is less widespread but there is still a concern about inadequate delivery of justice," says Mr Nadery.

    "I know the reality of life for Afghan women," says Badam Bagh's no-nonsense prison director, Zarafshana. Unusual for an Afghan woman, she wears a business suit and no headscarf.

    "If these women were treated with justice, I don't think 50% of them would be in here. They are here because of problems in the family or personal vendettas."

    As we sit in a glassed in room with Zarafshana, we see Sorarya strutting down the corridor.

    She told us she would be released today. But when we leave she is still waiting for clearance to re-join the world outside.


    Source: BBC News

    Atheism is a non-prophet organization.

    The sleeper has awakened -  Dune

    Give a man a fish, and you'll feed him for a day Give him a religion, and he'll starve to death while praying for a fish!
  • Re: Afghanistan
     Reply #27 - June 30, 2010, 01:20 PM

    Prior to the 2001 U.S.-led invasion that ousted the Taliban, virtually no girls were enrolled in school. Today, a record 2.5 million girls are enrolled in grades first through 12th, according to UNICEF, the United Nations' children's fund. That's up from 839,000 in 2002.


    You guys should know about Afghanistan a bit., This Taliban cruel  game is played by Pakistani Army of that time with American and Saudi oil money to break the back of former Soviet Union. Afghans became victims of  that cruel game which  is played by these US/SAUDI/PAKISTANI  governments along 1000s of ROUGES OF ISLAM that are generated by the  Pakistani Madrassahs.

    Pakistani agents along with their selective Islam 'funding and training Afghan Taliban" for ages. This Taliban game actually started after Soviet withdrawal and US of A washing its hands., No one overseeing Afghanistan, it was left to the DOGS OF ISLAM trained by Rogues in Pakistan.    US of A happily enjoying the fruits of USSR break down and washing its hands without looking what happening inside millions of Muslim minds from Yemen to Indonesia left Afghan people to  the BRUTAL DOGS OF ISLAM.

      All this they did it  because of USSR tried its best to educate and Move Islam out of the minds of Muslims in that region  from Afghanistan to that Russian region Tatarstan.  The Taliban  game  started after Pakistani Agents killed that President  Dr. Najibullah,  who was President of Afghanistan   from September 30, 1987 – April 16, 1992.





    That is the  picture of Dr. Najibullah., Off course west washes its hands by saying that they are fighting Russian communism.  And this was done with the help of west , Specially Londonisthan with American Money and weapons.

    http://www.executedtoday.com/2009/09/27/1996-dr-mohammad-najibullah/

    watch these videos

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dMnuVs2Pr5o

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HxfBkEt8wJk

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ufJKfwtXlM0

    So that is what West does best.. Kill good people by using bad people and their God. I wrote this in another thread, let me paste it here

    I wish ONE COUNTRY IN WESTERN HEMISPHERE RULED by a fellow like Mullah Omar for 10 years. Then these idiots in west  will understand.    I wish One president of any country in the west is treated the way Dr. Najibullah was treated by the Muslim Ummah and Muslim Mullahs.  Then these political pundits of west  will understand Muhammad and his Islam

    Do not let silence become your legacy.. Question everything   
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Re: Afghanistan
     Reply #28 - June 30, 2010, 01:25 PM

    Just to let the readers know a  bit about Politics of Afghanistan and that man you see in this picture who was as good a patriot as any  one any where in this world from any country..



    Quote
    Najibullah (Pashto: نجيب الله), originally just Najib born on August 6, 1947   was the fourth and last President of the Democratic Republic of Afghanistan.  Najibullah was born in August 1947 to the Ahmadzai sub-tribe of the Ghilzai Pashtun tribe. Though born in Kabul, his ancestral village was located between the towns of Said Karam and Gardēz in Paktia Province. He was educated at Habibia High School and Kabul University, where he graduated with a doctor degree in medicine in 1975.

    In November 1986, Najibullah was elected president and a new constitution was adopted. Some of the innovations incorporated into the constitution were a multi-party political system, freedom of expression, and an Islamic legal system presided over by an independent judiciary.

    However, all of these measures were largely outweighed by the broad powers of the president, who commanded a military and police apparatus under the control of the Homeland Party (Hizb-i Watan, as the PDPA became known in 1988). In September he set up the National Compromise Commission to contact counter-revolutionaries "in order to complete the Saur Revolution in its new phase". Allegedly some 40,000 rebels were contacted.

    In this way, Najibullah had stabilized his political position enough to begin matching Moscow's moves toward withdrawal. On July 20, 1987, the withdrawal of Soviet troops from the country was announced.

    It was also during his Administration that the peak of the fighting came in 1985-86. The Soviet forces launched their largest and most effective assaults on the Mujahideen supply lines adjacent to Pakistan. Major campaigns had also forced the mujahedeen back to defensive positions near Herat and Kandahar.

    On the day Surobi fell to the Taliban, Najibullah sent a message to the United Nations in Islamabad, asking them to arrange the evacuation of himself, his brother Ahmadzai and some of his bodyguards, but the UN did not respond. While Najibullah was unable to leave Kabul, his family was able to flee the war-torn country and was granted political asylum by India. His wife Fatana and his three daughters have lived in exile in Delhi since 1992. A high ranking member of the Taliban militia, Mullah Mohammad Rabbani, said Najibullah deserved his fate. "He killed so many Islamic people and was against Islam and his crimes were so obvious that it had to happen. He was a communist", Rabbani said. Najibullah and his brother's bodies were brought down from the lamp post by the help of his tribesmen who took it to Gardez city in Paktia province.

    that is the short story of Dr. Najibullah.,  M.D.., The real Afghan Pashtun


    I  call  Muslim  mujahedeen as MUSLIM CRIMINALS,  BRAIN WASHED BY MUSLIM BABOONS"

    Do not let silence become your legacy.. Question everything   
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Re: Afghanistan
     Reply #29 - June 30, 2010, 04:08 PM

    My mum keeps hinting that we may go to Afghanistan this summer, will have to think of an excuse.  whistling2
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