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 Topic: Slave girls titties in Madinah

 (Read 3499 times)
  • 1« Previous thread | Next thread »
  • Slave girls titties in Madinah
     OP - September 16, 2009, 06:21 AM

    I've heard of this, that slave girls walked around with their tits hanging out in Madinah during and after Muhammad, and nobody cared. It was the noble women who wore niqab. Be a great proof against the mandatory-ness of hijab. Anyone seen it before, know where it can be found?

    I chose to get circumcised at 17, don't tell me I never believed.
  • Re: Slave girls titties in Madinah
     Reply #1 - September 16, 2009, 06:46 AM

    I first heard of this in a hamza yussuf lecture about ten years ago. He neglected to mention they were slaves  though , unurprisingly. It was in the context of an honor killing in the US at  the time, where the parents got upset that thir daughter was too westernized, wearing revealng clothes and maybe had a boyfriend too.

    if  yusuf had had more honesty and had explained why these ladies had there breasts out ( and wernt punished for it) then I'm sure it would've totally derailed his point. But hey ,that's apologists for you.

    I will try and look up the reference.

    We are in favor of tolerance, but it is a very difficult thing to tolerate the intolerant and impossible to tolerate the intolerable.

    -George Dennison Prentice
  • Re: Slave girls titties in Madinah
     Reply #2 - September 17, 2009, 12:21 PM

    This is true. Not only in Madinah but slave girls, up until very recently, have always been sold and advertised in the Muslim world topless. So potential buyers can inspect the goods.

    But it's not just slave girls, many women in Mo's day and age exposed one breast and circumambulated the Kabaa naked. If they still did that I would book another Umrah trip.

    Take the Pakman challenge and convince me there is a God and Mo was not a murdering, power hungry sex maniac.
  • Re: Slave girls titties in Madinah
     Reply #3 - September 17, 2009, 01:24 PM

    I thought female slaves were sold naked in Mo's day?
  • Re: Slave girls titties in Madinah
     Reply #4 - January 20, 2010, 11:34 PM

    I first heard of this in a hamza yussuf lecture about ten years ago. He neglected to mention they were slaves  though , unurprisingly. It was in the context of an honor killing in the US at  the time, where the parents got upset that thir daughter was too westernized, wearing revealng clothes and maybe had a boyfriend too.

    if  yusuf had had more honesty and had explained why these ladies had there breasts out ( and wernt punished for it) then I'm sure it would've totally derailed his point. But hey ,that's apologists for you.

    I will try and look up the reference.


    *Bump* Cheesy

    me wants to see titties
  • Re: Slave girls titties in Madinah
     Reply #5 - January 20, 2010, 11:40 PM

    This is true. Not only in Madinah but slave girls, up until very recently, have always been sold and advertised in the Muslim world topless. So potential buyers can inspect the goods.

    But it's not just slave girls, many women in Mo's day and age exposed one breast and circumambulated the Kabaa naked. If they still did that I would book another Umrah trip.



    I swear to Zeus.

    I keep reading stuff on this site that just smacks me across the face.

    Just when you thought things can't get any more depraved, they do.

    And Hamza Yousuf playing sophistry again by neglecting to mention the slaves - yeah that'll make sense. Even when a redeeming, complicating, sensual factor is introduced, there's an unmentionable dark side to it.





    "we can smell traitors and country haters"


    God is Love.
    Love is Blind. Stevie Wonder is blind. Therefore, Stevie Wonder is God.

  • Re: Slave girls titties in Madinah
     Reply #6 - January 20, 2010, 11:47 PM

    Pagan arabs were fuckin awesome.

    Iblis has mad debaterin' skillz. Best not step up unless you're prepared to recieve da pain.

  • Re: Slave girls titties in Madinah
     Reply #7 - January 21, 2010, 12:12 AM

    Pagan arabs were fuckin awesome.


    And from what I understand - the myth spread that there was wide spread killing of daughters was also a myth - I was over at Islamicboard and there was an interesting discussion about just that topic.

    So when one removes all the myths about the pagan arabs - they do come off as pretty fucking awesome. Women, wine and good food - with the odd battle here and there - sounds like a great life compared to the life of virtual slavery under Muhammad and his projected delusions of grandeur called 'The Qur'an'.

    "It's just a job. Grass grows, birds fly, waves pound the sand. I beat people up." - Muhammad Ali
  • Slave girls titties in Madinah
     Reply #8 - June 28, 2014, 06:25 AM

    I mentioned this the other day to a Saudi I was chatting with, he insisted it was the other way around. Slaves covered.

    `But I don't want to go among mad people,' Alice remarked.
     `Oh, you can't help that,' said the Cat: `we're all mad here. I'm mad.  You're mad.'
     `How do you know I'm mad?' said Alice.
     `You must be,' said the Cat, `or you wouldn't have come here.'
  • Slave girls titties in Madinah
     Reply #9 - June 28, 2014, 06:39 AM

    From what i remember reading, there was also a fashion in that region for women to wear a sheer see through dress with their breasts showing beneath, if you take a look at somali women today, they still wear the same dress at home or at parties, with a bra these days though, i can't get a pic link on my phone
  • Slave girls titties in Madinah
     Reply #10 - June 28, 2014, 06:48 AM

    Rising trend with the Somalis I've known over the years to be increasingly purist, Saudi influence, along with racial undertones in the form of a cultivated Arab worship. Talking to Somalis on this site it's not just me, it's a real thing. Arabs are the best of people and all that. They seem to be trying to make up for not being Arab. Fucking disgusting.

    `But I don't want to go among mad people,' Alice remarked.
     `Oh, you can't help that,' said the Cat: `we're all mad here. I'm mad.  You're mad.'
     `How do you know I'm mad?' said Alice.
     `You must be,' said the Cat, `or you wouldn't have come here.'
  • Slave girls titties in Madinah
     Reply #11 - June 28, 2014, 09:48 AM

    It's not Arab worship as much as it is Islamic puritanism (Wahhabism) which naturally comes with some adoption of ancient Arabian peninsula culture and erasure of traditional local culture. Obviously, traditional Somali garb is un-Islamic, as is music, as is colour and anything fun *sigh*. I'm yet to hear anyone refer to Arabs as "the best of people" though. The Wahhabi types usually try to appeal to pan-ummahism and emphasise the egalitarian, universal, colourblind nature of Islam. "An Arab is not superior to a non-Arab…" and all that. 

  • Slave girls titties in Madinah
     Reply #12 - June 28, 2014, 09:50 AM


    if you take a look at somali women today, they still wear the same dress at home or at parties, with a bra these days though, i can't get a pic link on my phone


    They're called dira3 (written dirac in Somali). They look like this (random pic from the net):
    http://i293.photobucket.com/albums/mm49/somali_dirt/b28b.jpg

    I've got photos of my mum in those back in the days. She was gorgeous! Women still wear them at weddings, though it's usually younger women who wear the more transparent ones. It's pretty shocking that women used to walk around in transparent dresses in Somalia when you consider that now it's mostly black veils :/
  • Slave girls titties in Madinah
     Reply #13 - June 28, 2014, 09:54 AM

    Hey yeah thats the dress, i used to have a few lol..  theyre beautiful, and you wear an elaborate, decorative satin skirt underneath..  i think many cultures wore that type of revealing gown in the ancient times, the egytian women wore a skirt a sheer top, breasts on display or they would go topless.. Suppose it was the hebrew tribes, later christian and muslim who told pious women to cover their naked breasts in public.. Hence the hijab :/
  • Slave girls titties in Madinah
     Reply #14 - June 28, 2014, 09:55 AM

    It's sad that throughout so many parts of the muslim world, you go back in time and see women with more freedom than they have today.


    "I came into the world imbued with the will to find a meaning in things, my spirit filled with the desire to attain to the source of the world, and then I found that I was an object in the midst of other objects" - Fanon
  • Slave girls titties in Madinah
     Reply #15 - June 28, 2014, 11:10 AM

    It's not Arab worship as much as it is Islamic puritanism (Wahhabism) which naturally comes with some adoption of ancient Arabian peninsula culture and erasure of traditional local culture. Obviously, traditional Somali garb is un-Islamic, as is music, as is colour and anything fun *sigh*. I'm yet to hear anyone refer to Arabs as "the best of people" though. The Wahhabi types usually try to appeal to pan-ummahism and emphasise the egalitarian, universal, colourblind nature of Islam. "An Arab is not superior to a non-Arab…" and all that. 



    I'm not saying that it's an actual racial thing like most would think of, but it amounts to that. From my own observations an increasing number of Somalis (including the tribal "Don't marry a non-Somali" type) are in awe of Arabs and would be over the moon if their son/daughter married one. As I said and you agreed it's a purist thing, cultivated from what I can tell by an increasing Saudi influence.

    `But I don't want to go among mad people,' Alice remarked.
     `Oh, you can't help that,' said the Cat: `we're all mad here. I'm mad.  You're mad.'
     `How do you know I'm mad?' said Alice.
     `You must be,' said the Cat, `or you wouldn't have come here.'
  • Slave girls titties in Madinah
     Reply #16 - June 28, 2014, 11:15 AM

     
    They're called dira3 (written dirac in Somali). They look like this (random pic from the net):
    http://i293.photobucket.com/albums/mm49/somali_dirt/b28b.jpg

    I've got photos of my mum in those back in the days. She was gorgeous! Women still wear them at weddings, though it's usually younger women who wear the more transparent ones. It's pretty shocking that women used to walk around in transparent dresses in Somalia when you consider that now it's mostly black veils :/

    Well..

    Mom.. why are you wearing tents.. what happened to you? what is wrong with you? ..

    How about that question?  before you ask that., make sure you clean the Kitchen and make dinner  on that day....

    Freedom of Expression is a Fundamental Right  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Slave girls titties in Madinah
     Reply #17 - June 28, 2014, 01:44 PM

    ...
  • Slave girls titties in Madinah
     Reply #18 - June 28, 2014, 05:03 PM

    And from what I understand - the myth spread that there was wide spread killing of daughters was also a myth


    If it were as widespread as muslims make it out to be there wouldn't have been an Arab people!

  • Slave girls titties in Madinah
     Reply #19 - June 28, 2014, 05:16 PM

    I've always thought that one was stupid for the same reason.

    Then again, there is still an Indian people, and they have huge issues with female infanticide, which is why I always wonder if there was some truth to it at the same time. 


    "I came into the world imbued with the will to find a meaning in things, my spirit filled with the desire to attain to the source of the world, and then I found that I was an object in the midst of other objects" - Fanon
  • Slave girls titties in Madinah
     Reply #20 - June 28, 2014, 05:18 PM

    In Ancient Egypt as well during the time of the Pharaohs the laws pertaining to women were strikingly similar to the laws and rights Islam gave women that are lauded by Muslims and pro-Islam individuals.

    http://www.ancient.eu.com/article/623/

    Quote
    Women in Ancient Egyptian Society
       by Lucy de Masson
    published on 30 January 2014

    In ancient Egyptian society, women were treated differently than women of other ancient societies. Ancient Egyptian society offered women the greatest opportunities of the Mediterranean societies in relation to their economic, legal, and social positions. They enjoyed the same legal, economic and social rights as Egyptian men. Even though the primary source evidence is limited, it is still possible to use evidence found in temples, tombs on monuments, artwork and surviving texts to establish the role of women in Egyptian society.

    (Clicky for piccy!)
    Egyptian Royal Woman

    Egyptian women enjoyed the same economic rights as men and therefore were able to make economic decisions on their own. A woman in ancient Egypt was able to own property in her own right and, if married, could own joint property with her husband . Property that a woman acquired on her own was hers to dispose of as she pleased, and any property acquired during a marriage became “joint property”. If the husband should dispose of any joint property, he was legally bound to recompense his wife with property of the same value.The property a woman could own, manage, and sell included slaves, livestock, land, goods, and servants. Women obtained this property by using goods earned from employment, by borrowing, or as gifts from inheritances.

    Like other ancient civilisations, there were a range of jobs available to Egyptian women; however, these tasks saw them occupy various jobs according their social classes. Women in the lower classes not only worked within the home, attending to household chores and caring for children, but also had to work outside tending livestock and working in the fields, particularly during harvest. Occupations such as skilled weavers, mourners, musicians, stewards, composers, singers, dancers, beer brewers, and bakers were also available to women.There were professional positions available for educated women such as priestesses, administrators, or supervisors. Educated and wealthy women in some instances became judges, overseers, governors, doctors, and even prime ministers because of their ability to read and write. If a woman performed the same job as a man, she received the same rations and goods as a man received for this work, and so her wages made a valuable contribution to the family’s wealth.

    The higher status of women was also reflected in women being treated equally with men in the legal system. Women could act as plaintiffs, defendants, and witnesses before the court without having to go through a male representative as was the usual practice for women in other societies. Women were entitled to sue and could also enter into contracts including any legal settlements with regards to marriage, divorce, property, and employment. A woman was also responsible, and held accountable, for any transactions or contracts she entered into on her own. These equal economic and legal rights were not confined to one social class and were available at all levels of Egyptian society.

    One particular contract Egyptian women entered into was a self-enslavement contract.  Women entered into these contracts for different reasons such as to repay a creditor or to ensure financial security and provisions, and sometimes a woman might include her children in executing this arrangement. One such contract, in which a woman bound herself to the temple of Saknebtynis, states, “I am your servant, together with my children and my children’s children. I shall not be free in your precinct forever and ever. You will protect me; you will keep me safe, you will guard me. You will keep me sound; you will protect me from every demon, and I will pay you 1¼ Kita of copper until the completion of 99 years”. An Egyptian woman was able to freely negotiate and satisfy herself with the terms of a self-enslavement contract before she entered into this arrangement.

    There is no evidence of marriage ceremonies, but contracts survive whereby the man and woman made a marriage agreement. While Egyptian women could earn some wealth, they entered into marriage contracs with their husbands to ensure that the father of their children would provide for them and their children’s material future. These contracts dealt only with economic concerns and documented how the husband would be responsible for feeding and clothing his wife and their children and the right of the children to inherit his wealth. Because this was documented as being the annual responsibility of husbands, they were known as “annuity contracts” and were entered into by the husband directly with his wife. If the marriage should end, the wife was entitled to her dowry and up to one third of the joint property accrued during the marriage plus any other divorce settlement written in the marriage contract. These contracts protected the economic and legal rights of women.

    An Egyptian woman had the same legal rights as a man and this enabled her to inherit property on the same basis as a man. A woman could inherit property from her husband and family and, if her husband pre-deceased her, she inherited one third of their joint property. If her husband wanted her to inherit more or even all of his wealth he could draw up a imyt-pr “house document” which was a legal document for donating property (Tyldesley, ND). A husband could also legally adopt his wife as a “child” if he did not want to give any of his wealth to his siblings, and therefore his wife could inherit all of his wealth if there were no children or a share of the two thirds if there were children.

    Because of her legal rights, an Egyptian woman could act on her own to make her will. She could also make a will and leave her property, which she had obtained independently of her husband, to her children. A will written out by a noblewoman Naunakte states, “I am a free woman of Egypt. I have raised eight children, and I have provided them with everything suitable for their station in life” (Bingham, 2007:9). She could make a will leaving property from her husband to her children and family members and, if she wanted to, she could disinherit her children but only of the property she brought to the marriage and her one third of the joint property.

    The social expectations on women in ancient Egypt included their roles as wife and mother, their public behaviour, and their clothing and appearance. While a woman was legally responsible for her own actions in ancient Egyptian society, she was often seen as being dependent on her husband who was expected to take good care of her as stated in the literary text “The Instructions of the Vizier Ptahhotep”: “When you prosper and found your house and love your wife with ardor, fill her belly, clothe her back; ointment soothes her body. Gladden her heart as long as you live; she is a fertile field for her Lord” (Johnson, 2002). Egyptian society believed that a happy and contented home life should be the norm and that this could be achieved by a husband and wife loving and caring for each other in accordance with the principle of ma'at, universal harmony.

    The job of managing the household was that of the woman. She cared for the children, prepared food, cleaned, and also involved herself in the business of finding food the family did not grow and swapping surplus food they had grown.  In wealthy and middle class households, servants did much of the work around the house, while the women, particularly the wealthy, were ladies of leisure. As the mistresses of the household, the women of ancient Egypt, no matter their class, were seen as being responsible for the happiness of the home both in life and death.  In a letter found in a tomb, a widower believed his misfortune was the result of his wife punishing him from the afterlife and he begs her to believe he is innocent of any wrongdoing: “What wicked thing have I done to thee that I should come to this evil pass…” (Nardo). In Egyptian society the wife’s importance, as mistress of the household, was such that Egyptians believed she could punish her husband from the afterlife for any offence he had hidden from her.

    Egyptian women placed great value on personal appearance, grooming, and hygiene. Their status was defined by their dress, with upper class women using clothing, elaborate makeup, and jewellery to distinguish themselves from the lower classes who dressed simply. Elaborate head ornaments in particular signified a woman’s social standing. Education also distinguished the women, with upper class women being able to read and write and the middle class and wives of professional men less so, while poor women were illiterate.

    Through inscriptions on walls and monuments, wall paintings, tomb paintings, statues, documents, carvings, and papyrus, the Egyptians recorded how they treated women in ancient Egypt. Inscriptions and wall paintings depicting women and men attending banquets together and hunting and fishing together are evidence of them enjoying a social life together. Tombs decorated with paintings of deceased women dressed elaborately in the latest fashion and containing perfume, cosmetics, and toiletry items for the afterlife were expressions of the men’s affection for their wives. Egyptian women were free to go alone in public either working in the fields, in estate workshops, or travelling and were not confined to the household. On an inscription, Ramses III boasts, “I enabled the woman of Egypt to go her own way, her journeys being extended where she wanted, without any person assaulting her on the road” (Picone, ND).

    Egyptians believed in complete equality between women and men and, when the historian Herodotus visited ancient Egypt, he was so surprised by this equality, which was so unlike other ancient societies, that he wrote of the Egyptians, “they have reversed the ordinary practices of mankind” (Fletcher, 2011). Surviving accounts and contracts documented this equality between Egyptian men and women stating that women received the same rations as men for undertaking the same job. Papyrus showed Isis bestowing gifts on humanity giving as much power and honour to the women as she did to men. Other papyrus detailed how a woman was able to acquire wealth independent of her husband. An annuity contract found in a Ptolemaic “Family Archive” from Siut detailed how a woman, when a couple divorced, received her fair share of the couple’s property. These documents indicated how Egyptian men treated women as equals.

    Egyptian women were not subservient to men in marriage or divorce. Unlike other ancient societies, Egyptian women were free to choose the men they married and they could also divorce their husbands. Marriage was very important to Egyptians, love and affection between a husband and wife was important, and to all classes of Egyptians, marriage was the norm.

    Artistic representations depict men and woman as happy equals. Carvings and wall paintings and statues all expressed obvious affection between Egyptian men and women. Documentary and literary texts instructed men on how to treat their wives by giving them love and protection. Art and historical documents, found in tombs, depicted how women had the same legal and economic rights as men.

    Temples, inscriptions, wall paintings, and statues representing powerful female deities indicate a society that valued males and females equally and that women were not subservient to men in ancient Egypt. Female goddesses such as Maat who gave balance and order to all things, Hathor the Mother Goddess, the goddess of love and healing, and Isis who, like Hathor, had protective powers, were some of the female deities honored equally with male deities. These female deities were as important as the male gods in Egyptian daily life as was the goddess Bastet, one of the most popular of all Egyptian deities, who presided over women's health and safety, childbirth, and the home. Men and women in ancient Egypt honored Bastet equally and this is significant in illustrating the high regard in which women were held.

    (Clicky for piccy!)
    Isis-Hathor

     


    Written by Lucy de Masson, published on 30 January 2014 under the following license: Creative Commons: Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike. This license lets others remix, tweak, and build upon this content non-commercially, as long as they credit the author and license their new creations under the identical terms.

    References

    Female occupations in Ancient Egypt. Womens Jobs. Work

    The Gifts of Isis: Women's Status in Ancient Egypt (Article) -- Ancient History Encyclopedia

    The Status of Women in Egyptian Society

    Virtual-Egypt - The Egyptian People's Papyrus

    What Women Could Do in Ancient Egypt - New York Times
    http://www.nytimes.com/1997/02/21/arts/what-women-could-do-in-ancient-...

    Women in Ancient Egypt

    Bingham, J. In Ancient Egypt (Men, Women & Children). Wayland (Publishers) Ltd, 2009.

    Caminos, R.A. World Book Encyclopedia 2013. Word Book, London, 1978. Page(s) 93-94.

    Casson, L.. Ancient Egypt. Time-Life, NY, 1965. Page(s) 110-115.

    Manning, R.. Ancient Egyptian Women. Harcourt Education, London, 2002. Page(s) 17.

    Oakes, L. Sacred Sites of Ancient Egypt& Tombs of the Pharaohs. Hermes House, 2014.


    Even seem to have had more rights than Islam afforded.

    I know it precedes Islam by a fair whack. The ideas were not new however.

    "It's not enough to say that I don't believe in God. I actually regard the system as distressing: I am offended by some of the things said in the Bible and the Qur'an and I refute them." Emma Thompson

    Chat: http://client01.chat.mibbit.com/#ex-muslims
  • Slave girls titties in Madinah
     Reply #21 - June 28, 2014, 06:15 PM

    Looks like you just added to the evidence against Jahaliyya.

    I don't want to be good anymore. I want to be right.
  • Slave girls titties in Madinah
     Reply #22 - June 28, 2014, 06:24 PM

    Roman Republic laws were similar but had a guardian clause. These laws didn't change until the Empire era.
  • Slave girls titties in Madinah
     Reply #23 - June 28, 2014, 06:24 PM

    Evidence against Jahaliyya? What is Jahaliyya?

    "It's not enough to say that I don't believe in God. I actually regard the system as distressing: I am offended by some of the things said in the Bible and the Qur'an and I refute them." Emma Thompson

    Chat: http://client01.chat.mibbit.com/#ex-muslims
  • Slave girls titties in Madinah
     Reply #24 - June 28, 2014, 06:34 PM

    The rights women had in Ancient Egypt were greater than those accorded to women under Shariah for the rights of (mostly uperclass) women were INDEPENDENT of men and based upon secular law that could be improved upon with time and thus not 'fixed' as religious laws appear to be.

    The fact is, no matter how the apologists wish to spin it, women are under the guardianship (remember there is no mention of mental capacity here as all women under all cicrumstances are referred to here) of men (who may indeed be of poor mental and physical state).

    Women in Pre-Islamic Arabia (The wider Near East) enjoyed varying degrees of freedom from the Nabatean Queens to women (from the priviliged upper-middle class or aristocracy) serving as priestesses, political advisors, poets and businesswomen. These were intellectual pursuits that were not limited by the presence of men, though they functioned under a patriarchal system. When muslims talk about 'well, women took part in military expeditions' you can suggest that dressing the wounded soldiers and carrying banners/flags pales in comparison to some of the more secular based activities women were invovled in.

    Unfortunately, it appears as though Muslim women would veil because of a certain ayat that was revealed following the actions of a peeping tom Sahabi. Though, in Arabian society slaves and prostitutes would be forced NOT to veil and severely reprimanded if they did. It could then be argued that the veil was an instrument of CLASS superiority in which the newly-organised political entity would assert its military dominance and ideological superiority over others.

    I'm going on a march..'coz I want Britun 2 b 'bout British.
  • Slave girls titties in Madinah
     Reply #25 - June 28, 2014, 07:04 PM

    The rights women had in Ancient Egypt were greater than those accorded to women under Shariah for the rights of (mostly uperclass) women were INDEPENDENT of men and based upon secular law that could be improved upon with time and thus not 'fixed' as religious laws appear to be.

    The fact is, no matter how the apologists wish to spin it, women are under the guardianship (remember there is no mention of mental capacity here as all women under all cicrumstances are referred to here) of men (who may indeed be of poor mental and physical state).

    Women in Pre-Islamic Arabia (The wider Near East) enjoyed varying degrees of freedom from the Nabatean Queens to women (from the priviliged upper-middle class or aristocracy) serving as priestesses, political advisors, poets and businesswomen. These were intellectual pursuits that were not limited by the presence of men, though they functioned under a patriarchal system. When muslims talk about 'well, women took part in military expeditions' you can suggest that dressing the wounded soldiers and carrying banners/flags pales in comparison to some of the more secular based activities women were invovled in.

    Unfortunately, it appears as though Muslim women would veil because of a certain ayat that was revealed following the actions of a peeping tom Sahabi. Though, in Arabian society slaves and prostitutes would be forced NOT to veil and severely reprimanded if they did. It could then be argued that the veil was an instrument of CLASS superiority in which the newly-organised political entity would assert its military dominance and ideological superiority over others.



    “I don't mind living in a man's world, as long as I can be a woman in it.” Marilyn Monroe (response to the bold part)

    Women, not ghosts!

    "It's not enough to say that I don't believe in God. I actually regard the system as distressing: I am offended by some of the things said in the Bible and the Qur'an and I refute them." Emma Thompson

    Chat: http://client01.chat.mibbit.com/#ex-muslims
  • Slave girls titties in Madinah
     Reply #26 - June 28, 2014, 08:30 PM

    Evidence against Jahaliyya? What is Jahaliyya?

    The supposed 'Time of Ignorance' in Arabia prior to the advent of Islam.

  • Slave girls titties in Madinah
     Reply #27 - June 28, 2014, 08:35 PM

    Ahhh! Yes rather puts a kibosh on that!

    "It's not enough to say that I don't believe in God. I actually regard the system as distressing: I am offended by some of the things said in the Bible and the Qur'an and I refute them." Emma Thompson

    Chat: http://client01.chat.mibbit.com/#ex-muslims
  • Slave girls titties in Madinah
     Reply #28 - July 03, 2014, 07:44 PM

    I remember watching a documentary about a tribe in Amazonia where women walk around with naked breasts. They were very modest though, when the men making this film came closer, they were lowering their gazes and moving away from them. The fact that they walk half naked doesn't mean they are immodest. This just means no man ever told them it's wrong. Good for them Wink I prefer wearing a bra and a shirt but if I had breasts as firm as hooris I would definitely sunbathe topless Tongue
  • Slave girls titties in Madinah
     Reply #29 - July 03, 2014, 09:09 PM

    I mentioned this the other day to a Saudi I was chatting with, he insisted it was the other way around. Slaves covered.


    Well from what I know slaves before Islam came didn't wear veils which the upper class women did. This was to distinguish their classes. I heard that the same rule was also present in Rome. After Islam came the rule didn't change maybe because they were mostly non-Muslims, so people weren't much bothered about their clothes. After all Islam is an Arabic religion and why let such good excuse to see women's bodies slip? It is my opinion that the Quran encourages the men to harass the women who don't follow the purdah, as it is said there that women should veil themselves so as not to be harassed. I don't know whether this hadith is correct or not but that devil Umar actually beat a slave for wearing a veil and trying to show herself as an upper class lady, according to the rules of those days.
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