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 Topic: Maryam Namazie speech blocked by the Student Union

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  • Maryam Namazie speech blocked by the Student Union
     Reply #60 - December 09, 2015, 02:06 AM

    If islamists can speak on campus why can't I?

    Maryam Namazie on how she took on the campus censors and won

    Quote
    This week, a crucial blow was struck for freedom of speech on British campuses. Maryam Namazie, Iranian-born secularist campaigner and spokesperson of Ex-Muslims of Britain, took on the campus censors and won, providing a bit of hope for students across the land trying desperately to debate, discuss and broaden their minds under the cosh of students’ union bureaucracy.

    Namazie was due to give a talk at an event organised by the Warwick Atheist, Secularist and Humanist Society (WASH) on Monday. But, earlier this month, the student organisers received an email from Warwick SU informing them that their external-speaker application had been denied. ‘After researching both her and her organisation, a number of flags have been raised’, read the message. ‘There are a number of articles written both by the speaker and by others about the speaker that indicate that she is highly inflammatory, and could incite hatred on campus. This is in contravention of our external-speaker policy.’

    Neither Namazie nor WASH took it lying down. In a series of posts and press releases they ripped apart the union’s risk-averse reasoning. Namazie, a fierce critic of Islamism, Sharia courts and the veil, is certainly controversial in these increasingly sensitive times, but, as she coyly pointed out in one fiery post, ‘the Islamists incite hatred, not us’: ‘It’s a topsy-turvy world when “progressives” who are meant to be on our side take a stand with our oppressors and try to deny us the only tool we have to resist – our freedom of expression.’

    Under the weight of bad press and social-media indignation, the union issued a statement on Sunday night, announcing that it would issue Namazie a ‘full and unequivocal apology’. Ever the bureaucrats, the SU officials claimed that protocol, in this case, was not followed properly. Talking to Namazie yesterday, I asked her what she thinks this victory means for the fight for free speech on campus; I found her in a measured rather than triumphant mood.

    ‘It’s not just a problem with Warwick, but one that we’re seeing across the board’, she said, reminding me that this wasn’t the first time she’d come face-to-face with the campus thoughtpolice. In March she was forced to pull out of an event organised at Trinity College, Dublin after college security said it would be ‘antagonising’ to Muslims and tried to place restrictions on who could attend. ‘Sometimes the student groups who have invited me have preferred not to make it an issue. But, after a while, I made the decision that I will try to fight it through where I can’, she continues. ‘Luckily, this time the student group [at Warwick] worked closely with me on it.’

    Given that so many speakers and societies end up giving in to the ridiculous restrictions placed on them, this kickback was heartening. Not least because the dodgy arguments that prop up student censorship so often go unchallenged. ‘The main crux of [Warwick SU’s] argument was that I will incite discrimination against, and intimidation of, Muslim students’, Namazie says. ‘First of all, which Muslim students are they talking about? They’ve bought into this idea that a Muslim equals an Islamist, and that there’s no difference between Islam, the religion, Islamism, a part of the religious right, and Muslims, who are people with as different a range of beliefs as anybody else.’

    Dodgy thinking and double standards permeate modern campus bans. Despite the flurry of softly-softly censorship on British campuses in recent years, in which everything from newspapers to sombreros to pole-dancing societies has been banned in the name of creating a ‘safe’ and ‘inclusive’ space, SU politicos have been more than happy to libel lads, rough up student organisers they disagree with and allow the anti-Semitic disgrace that is Israel Apartheid Week to take place every year with impunity while pro-Israel speakers are deemed dangerous and discriminatory. Still, the biggest double standard of them all surrounds the issue of Islam. The National Union of Students (NUS) has taken up arms against the British government’s plans to clamp down on Islamist speakers, despite the fact that the backward views many of them espouse would be in breach of any Safe Space policy in the land.

    I put this to Namazie – who, as a feminist, human-rights campaigner and strident leftist, would, you’d think, have more in common with Warwick SU than, say, the gaggle of genuine hate-spewers they have happily hosted in recent Islamic Society events. ‘The things [SUs] want for themselves, whether it’s gay rights or women’s rights or equality, it seems that it doesn’t apply to the rest of us’, she says. ‘Part of that has to do with multiculturalism. Not, of course, the fantastic lived experience where we have people from everywhere living together, but as a social policy which separates groups into homogenised communities. Hand in hand with that comes this idea that it’s their culture, it’s their religion; they are different from us. And to demand equality is therefore somehow discriminatory and racist. It’s a scandalous thing to say.’

    ‘Islamist groups are organised, through Islamic Societies, on university campuses’, Namazie continues. ‘They are funded and they do use threatening and intimidating behaviour to stop much-needed debate.’ And herein lies the crucial issue. While Islamist speakers have largely been spared the full brunt of campus illiberalism, the tightening up of debate around them and the constant insistence on tip-toeing around the issue of Islam have allowed certain enclaves of Islamism to flourish. When free debate is stifled, not only are some backward ideas driven underground, but others are insulated from criticism, as dissidents, like Namazie, are silenced.

    Having fled Iran with her family after the revolution, and worked on human-rights causes in Islamist-run countries across the Arab world, Namazie is, perhaps understandably, cagey about continuing to allow Islamists to run loose on campus. Incitement to hatred, she hints at one point, is somewhere where the law could play a role. I’m not convinced: as Namazie herself has found out, accusations of ‘incitement to hatred’ are often used to silence those who simply have very unpopular views. But before we part ways she makes clear that what we really need is more debate, not less: ‘Freedom of expression means nothing if it’s just for people you agree with. Even people with the vilest views, who deny the Holocaust or defend the Caliphate, they have a right to speak, as do we. The problem is that they’ve always had the right to speak and we never have.’


    `But I don't want to go among mad people,' Alice remarked.
     `Oh, you can't help that,' said the Cat: `we're all mad here. I'm mad.  You're mad.'
     `How do you know I'm mad?' said Alice.
     `You must be,' said the Cat, `or you wouldn't have come here.'
  • Maryam Namazie speech blocked by the Student Union
     Reply #61 - December 09, 2015, 11:31 PM

    That lady is very brave, especially with the Muhammad and Jesus cartoon.

    I'm sure most can see the irony of a Muslim group protesting a talk about Islam's stance against freedom of speech, by impeding the speech-giver's right to speak freely.  Cheesy
  • Maryam Namazie speech blocked by the Student Union
     Reply #62 - December 09, 2015, 11:33 PM

    They totally wouldn't see that. grin12

    Devious, treacherous, murderous, neanderthal, sub-human of the West. bunny
  • Maryam Namazie speech blocked by the Student Union
     Reply #63 - December 10, 2015, 01:45 AM

    Censorship: The real islamophobia on campus

    Quote
    After coming under intense scrutiny, Queen’s University Belfast has reneged on its decision to cancel an upcoming conference entitled ‘Understanding Charlie: New Perspectives on Contemporary Citizenship After Charlie Hebdo’. The university called off the conference last week, citing security concerns. The original decision to cancel the conference was met with widespread condemnation, with philosopher Brian Klug, one of the prospective delegates, saying he was ‘baffled’ and ‘dismayed’ by the decision.

    Clampdowns on university debates about Islam have become common in the wake of the Charlie Hebdo massacre. Last month, Iranian-born human-rights activist Maryam Namazie was due to speak about Islamism and apostasy at Trinity College Dublin (TCD). However, TCD’s security services imposed restrictions on her talk at the last minute, fearing that the event would be ‘one-sided’ and ‘antagonising’ to Muslim students. Security insisted that there be a moderator at the talk and that only members of the student society that had organised the event would be allowed to attend. Namazie rejected the restrictions and the event was called off. In a blog post she wrote after the incident, she claimed that Islamist speakers who advocated the killing of apostates had previously been able to speak at TCD uninhibited.

    The cancellations at both Queen’s and TCD reflect a broader post-Hebdo concern among university bureaucrats that hosting anti-Islamist speakers will stoke-up tensions within the university. The implicit assumption here is that Muslim students simply can’t handle having their religion critiqued. This is all, of course, in spite of the fact that universities play host to debates about God, Islam and religion on an almost daily basis, and the vast majority of Muslim students are more than capable of taking part. The great irony here is that, while university authorities are bending over backwards not to be seen to be denigrating Muslims, the decision to pull these events on the basis of ‘security concerns’ portrays Muslim students as uniquely violent and belligerent. That’s pretty Islamophobic if you ask me.


    Maryam Namazie's blog post: http://freethoughtblogs.com/maryamnamazie/2015/03/20/tcd/

    `But I don't want to go among mad people,' Alice remarked.
     `Oh, you can't help that,' said the Cat: `we're all mad here. I'm mad.  You're mad.'
     `How do you know I'm mad?' said Alice.
     `You must be,' said the Cat, `or you wouldn't have come here.'
  • Maryam Namazie speech blocked by the Student Union
     Reply #64 - December 11, 2015, 01:56 PM

    Don't think the whole video has been posted on here and still available on Youtube.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-1ZiZdz5nao&feature=youtu.be

    I din't realise "Safe space" existed outside South Park until I saw this video, what a bunch of sad and insecure lot these people are.
  • Maryam Namazie speech blocked by the Student Union
     Reply #65 - December 11, 2015, 08:28 PM

    A bunch of fascists crying wolf. You give up the safe space card when you willing enter a room for a lecture covering a controversial topic in which the speaker is controversial. You agreed to and entered her safe space...
  • Maryam Namazie speech blocked by the Student Union
     Reply #66 - December 11, 2015, 08:45 PM

    Poor Maryam. She gets accused of spreading hatred against Muslims by hardline Muslims (insane rubbish divorced from reality) and I've actually seen online comments by counter-Jihad nut jobs calling her a crypto-Muslim, jihad supporter (also insane in the membrane).

    Sarte was right, hell is other people.


  • Maryam Namazie speech blocked by the Student Union
     Reply #67 - December 12, 2015, 01:29 AM

    A bunch of fascists crying wolf. You give up the safe space card when you willing enter a room for a lecture covering a controversial topic in which the speaker is controversial. You agreed to and entered her safe space...


    Isn't this just common sense though? How would these students cry safe space when they're the ones harassing Maryam?

    And they still dare to act all hurt when their stupidity was caught on camera? LOOL
  • Maryam Namazie speech blocked by the Student Union
     Reply #68 - December 12, 2015, 01:38 AM

    The sad part is that Muslims like this are not sincere when they call for help or claim "harassment."

    For example, at some of these muslim protests, you will see cops trying to keep everything calm and safe and if a cop happens to accidentally touch a muslim, they immediately cry, "Don't touch me! I know my rights! This is injustice!"  Roll Eyes

    "If you don't like your religion's fundamentalists, then maybe there's something wrong with your religion's fundamentals."
    "Demanding blind respect but not offering any respect in reciprocation is laughable."
    "Let all the people in all the worlds be in peace."
  • Maryam Namazie speech blocked by the Student Union
     Reply #69 - December 12, 2015, 04:19 PM

    Isn't this just common sense though? How would these students cry safe space when they're the ones harassing Maryam?

    And they still dare to act all hurt when their stupidity was caught on camera? LOOL


    Too many use the term common sense as if it was real. Common sense is not common nor sense. It is an idea that everyone can be rational which the history of humanity shows is nonsense and has created incorrect conclusions for centuries.
  • Maryam Namazie speech blocked by the Student Union
     Reply #70 - December 12, 2015, 05:05 PM

    Quote
    Too many use the term common sense as if it was real. Common sense is not common nor sense. It is an idea that everyone can be rational which the history of humanity shows is nonsense and has create incorrect conclusions.


    Would 'logical' instead of 'common sense' fit the bill, particularly in a university setting? 

    What really boggles reason how the other student unions buy into this the ISOC crap. 
  • Maryam Namazie speech blocked by the Student Union
     Reply #71 - December 12, 2015, 11:17 PM

    Logic would be better since logical thinking usually requires education whereas common sense is just something granted without cause.

    Some unions may not have been aware of  their acts before this event. Also the left which is huge in universities has a blind spot when it comes to something exotic like Islam. I remember using the Bible in literature class and people were almost beside themselves over it.
  • Maryam Namazie speech blocked by the Student Union
     Reply #72 - December 13, 2015, 02:07 AM

    Well, common sense isn't really common sense... Because most people don't have it  dance
  • Maryam Namazie speech blocked by the Student Union
     Reply #73 - December 13, 2015, 02:10 AM

    I knew it was coming..  laughing6

    "If you don't like your religion's fundamentalists, then maybe there's something wrong with your religion's fundamentals."
    "Demanding blind respect but not offering any respect in reciprocation is laughable."
    "Let all the people in all the worlds be in peace."
  • Maryam Namazie speech blocked by the Student Union
     Reply #74 - December 13, 2015, 05:38 AM

    Well, common sense isn't really common sense... Because most people don't have it  dance

     yes
  • Maryam Namazie speech blocked by the Student Union
     Reply #75 - December 13, 2015, 06:38 AM

    The sad part is that Muslims like this are not sincere when they call for help or claim "harassment."

    For example, at some of these muslim protests, you will see cops trying to keep everything calm and safe and if a cop happens to accidentally touch a muslim, they immediately cry, "Don't touch me! I know my rights! This is injustice!"  Roll Eyes


     Afro Afro  Afro

    I still remember when UK authorities tried to deport Abu Hamza Almasry to the States AND Abu Qatada to Jordan. They refused to leave claiming that there would be a risk to their lives and there were many legal actions against the UK authorities because They Know Their Rights !!!!

    They have their rights to criticise, insult, attack verbally and physically, protest against westerns inspire of living in the western countries and getting their social benefits !!!!!

    We are our thoughts. We cannot change anything
    if we cannot change our thinking.
  • Maryam Namazie speech blocked by the Student Union
     Reply #76 - December 13, 2015, 07:59 PM

    Well, common sense isn't really common sense... Because most people don't have it  dance


    Exactly.
  • Maryam Namazie speech blocked by the Student Union
     Reply #77 - December 16, 2015, 10:37 AM

    Goldsmiths' SU seem to think that all sides must be punished.

    With such a commitment to fairness, student politics is safe.
  • Maryam Namazie speech blocked by the Student Union
     Reply #78 - December 16, 2015, 11:03 AM

    Goldsmiths' SU seem to think that all sides must be punished.

    With such a commitment to fairness, student politics is safe.


    well problem is right here
    Quote
    http://www.goldsmithssu.org/societies/list/

    A Cappella Society
    ABACUS Society
    Acting and Filming Society
    African Caribbean Society
    Alliance for Workers Liberty Society
    Amnesty International Society
    Anime Society
    Art Soc
    Atheist, Secularist and Humanist Society
    Bass Society
    Believers Love World Society
    Chess Society
    Chocolate Society
    Christian Union
    CND Society
    Comedy Society
    Contact Improvisation Society
    Counterfire Society
    Craft Beer Society
    Creative Writing Society
    Debating
    Dedicated Listeners
    Drama Society
    English Society
    Feed the Need
    Feminist Society
    Ficitioning Society
    Film Making Society
    Gaming Society
    Gardening Society
    Gold Ventures
    Green Party Society
    Hacksmiths
    Harry Potter Society
    International Students Society
    Islamic Society
    Israel Society
    Jewish Society

    Korean Society
    Labour Students Society
    LGBTQ* Society
    Mature Students Society
    Meditation Society
    Middle Eastern and North African Society
    Model United Nations
    Music Society
    Musical Theatre Society
    Neuroscience Society
    Palestine Campaign
    Photography Society
    Platypus Marxist Society
    Psychology Society
    RAG
    RE:mind
    Salsa Dancing
    Sex Worker Solidarity Society

    SMITHS Magazine
    Stop the War Society
    Table Top & Game Design Society
    The Leopard
    Unicef Society
    Visual Cultures Society
    Wired Radio
    Women of Worth Society
    Young Socialists Society
    Zine Society


    look at those societies .. what kind of college  is that?? Societies making college  and getting funded by Tax payers  and selling degrees??

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Maryam Namazie speech blocked by the Student Union
     Reply #79 - December 16, 2015, 12:29 PM

    This is one of the better pieces I've seen on the Goldsmiths affair: The left must stand with apostates, too
  • Maryam Namazie speech blocked by the Student Union
     Reply #80 - December 20, 2015, 06:35 PM

    NCAFC defends the right to criticise religion and opposes the aggressive no-platforming of Maryam Namazie
    Quote
    This statement came as the result of a motion that was passed democratically by NCAFC members at our 2015 national conference.

    On Monday 30th November, a talk by Maryam Namazie on the topic “Apostasy, blasphemy and free expression in the age of ISIS”, hosted by Goldsmiths Atheist, Secularists and Humanists (ASH) Society, was aggressively disrupted by a number of men. They made noise, harassed Namazie and switched off Namazie’s PowerPoint presentation. One of Namazie’s fellow activists, Reza Moradi, said that one of those causing disruption issued a death threat at him (an allegation the protesters deny).

    Maryam Namazie is a socialist feminist activist with the Worker-Communist Party of Iran, who campaigns for secularism and against repression, particularly of women, that is associated with religious conservatism and the authoritarian state in Iran, from which she was forced to flee. Those disrupting the talk argued that it should not have gone ahead because they say that Namazie’s politics incite Islamophobia in Britain against Muslims.

    Meanwhile, other attendees, including Muslim students, opposed the disruption. A video of the event is linked at the bottom of this post.

    NCAFC’s members voted at our conference to express our opposition to how the event was disrupted. Shutting down discussion of oppression, in particular a group of men aggressively shouting down a woman discussing sexism, is unacceptable. Whether or not you agree with precisely what Namazie and the ASH Society have to say, this type of disruption and attempted denial of a platform is wrong. In general, with some particular exceptions, open debate and not tactics of “no platform” are the best way to deal with most political disagreements, especially when they are within the left. Indeed, a number of people attending tried to pursue their disagreements with Namazie through questions and discussion, but their ability to do so was limited by the disruption. So we stand for the right to speak and discuss on campuses about religion and politics, including for Goldsmiths ASH society and campaigners like Namazie.

    We need to recognise that there are many different sources and perpetrators of oppression, and right-wing and conservative religious forces are among them. The left must defend the freedom to practice or not practice any religion and oppose discrimination against groups of people based on their religion, and at the same time defend the right to criticise religious beliefs and practices – a right which is often most needed by members and ex-members of the religion in question.

  • Maryam Namazie speech blocked by the Student Union
     Reply #81 - December 20, 2015, 07:20 PM


    What is NCAFC?

    is it "Nation Crackheads Against Fighting Cults?"  .. Are they under 17?  do they have voting rights?/

    Do not let silence become your legacy  
    I renounced my faith to become a kafir, 
    the beloved betrayed me and turned in to  a Muslim
     
  • Maryam Namazie speech blocked by the Student Union
     Reply #82 - December 20, 2015, 07:23 PM

    ^What is the National Campaign Against Fees and Cuts?
  • Maryam Namazie speech blocked by the Student Union
     Reply #83 - March 04, 2017, 10:13 PM

    Identity politics and the art of deception
    Quote
    One of the things that is most troubling about identity politics and multiculturalism as a social policy is how deception becomes a necessity in defending the “tribe” or “community”, irrespective of the truth.

    Of course you don’t need to be an Islamist or on the far-Right to do this – something Sam Harris fans fail to understand. As long as one buys into the idea of essentially different communities and groups, promoting the Islamist narrative (under the guise of defending the Muslim “community”) or the far-Right one (under the guise of defending the Christian and Western “community”) is very easy to do.

    This translates into policies such as Muslim profiling or the barring of certain nationalities because individuals are seen to be extensions of or defined by the group or tribe they apparently belong to.

    It’s something “progressives” do all the time too when they come across any criticism of Islam or Sharia law. They hunker down behind what is fundamentally an Islamist project in order to defend “Muslims”, despite the human costs, including for many Muslims. Let me give you a few recent examples from British universities.

    At my talk in January at LSE on Sharia law’s incompatibility with human rights, a Mauritanian woman said that the inequities of Sharia law I was describing were not true with regards Mauritania. This is despite the fact that Mohamed Ould Cheikh Ould Mkhaitir is on death row for apostasy. Afterwards, whilst speaking to a colleague, she said she knew about the apostasy case but thought no one else would. In fact, she had come to Britain in order to “get away” from “the community”.

    This happened again at Westminster last week where I spoke on “Secularism and Diversity” with Tariq Modood. A woman strongly defended Sharia courts during the Q&A. After the event, she came up to me and privately said that she agreed with much of what I had said about the courts and that she herself had refused to go to one for her divorce.

    Of course, the truth is irrelevant when defending identity politics. Even if means legitimising or trivialising violence.

    This view permeates universities and Student Unions.

    I have earlier explained details of restrictions I faced at LSE and Westminster, but two articles in student media outlets necessitate that I clarify some points of misinformation, even if only to reiterate the pervasiveness of the Islamist narrative.

    One piece is entitled “‘Islamophobe’ to speak at Westminster” that was published before I spoke. The title says it all. The author didn’t bother to contact me, or the University’s Secular Adviser who had organised the event, for comment; nor was she interested in doing a follow up piece on the event (here are my opening remarks). Since apostates like myself are seen through Islamist eyes, what I actually have to say is irrelevant. That’s the crux of identity politics, though the “aspiring journalist” thought it was an: “Extremely neutral article to describe the situation in University“. Neutral indeed.

    Similarly, the author of an article on my talk at the LSE didn’t bother to ask me for a comment. If he had, I could have cleared up a few inaccuracies in his piece:

    * Firstly, I started my talk at LSE on the restrictions I faced not to “complain” but in the hopes of making some students think about how the Islamist narrative and identity politics prevent us from seeing the truth. The President of the Human Rights Society, Zohaib Ahmed, who had invited me there has generously said that I have: “the habit of playing the victim” but that is far from what I do. Those trying to restrict my talks are the ones playing victim. To them, the “other” (which is often a mirror image of themselves) is so fragile that they must be protected from an apostate’s point of view, whilst the welcome mat is dusted for Islamists like Hamdoon who promote death by stoning and the shunning of ex-Muslims.

    More importantly, criticising inequality in treatment is not “complaining”; at the very least, a “Human Rights Society” should be able to grasp this.

    * In the piece, Zohaib Ahmed further explains that “the chair was not imposed on Namazie’s talk because of the security classification – rather, there was a chair because the event was initially planned to be a debate with another speaker who subsequently pulled out. The chair was kept for logistical reasons…”

    This is again simply not true. In an email sent on 26 January (see screenshot here), the very same Zohaib Ahmed explained: “As for Dr. Hamdoon’s talk, similar restrictions were not placed, though the room provided was of similar capacity. There were no security concerns besides the general risks associated with organising any event. The talk was not chaired; this is because we only request academics to chair talks if it is required by the LSE Room Bookings. In your case, for concerns about controversial content, the Room Bookings team requested us to have a chair”.

    * The piece also asks: “And what about Namazie’s complaint of LSE security subjecting her to an unfair ordeal at the NAB entrance? That is not true either, he says. According to him, Namazie had come with five others who she claimed to be her security detail but whose presence was not made known to the event organisers beforehand, and therefore not registered by the LSE security staff.”

    Again this is not what happened. I never said the five were my “security detail”; I don’t have a “security detail”. I merely said that I would not enter on my own. I don’t think this is unreasonable given the obvious inclination in favour of Hamdoon shown by both the LSE and the Human Rights Society.

    * Finally on the issue of my being labelled “controversial” by the Human Rights Society though no such label was given for Hamdoon. In the piece it says:

    “She even criticised the society for describing her as ‘controversial’ in the description on the Facebook event page, a label which doesn’t seem unreasonable considering how previous events involving her at other universities have panned out, including a talk at Goldsmiths which was constantly disrupted by several audience members”.

    Of course the author, the Human Rights Society, LSE and anyone else can call me an “Islamophobe”, “controversial” or anything else for that matter – I have heard it all and worse. The point I am making though is that when I am labelled “controversial” and not Hamdoon, it’s because of the normalisation of an Islamist narrative which imposes de facto blasphemy and apostasy rules and sees apostates and blasphemers through the eyes of the Islamists.

    Furthermore, the Human Rights Society doesn’t see the irony of my being penalised for the disruptions, threats and intimidations carried out by Islamic Societies. It’s victim blaming at its finest. As Algerian sociologist Marieme Helie Lucas says:

    “I cannot even start telling you how one experiences a sense of madness when responsibilities are turned upside down in such a way; one feels like the raped girl, the battered woman, the child being caned who have been told by judges, police, families and media alike, over such a long period of time in history, that they were the ones truly responsible for sexual attacks, domestic violence and physical punishment in ‘education’; and that it was their own behaviour (how libertarian indeed! just being able to exist in the public space, to express an opinion, in short just enjoying one’s fundamental human rights!) which ‘induced’ these ‘responses’ – which were thus seen as legitimate.

    “Yes, we do have an already quite long experience of perversity, which magically turns the victim into the abuser and blames her for the crimes that are committed against her”.

    And so it continues.

  • Maryam Namazie speech blocked by the Student Union
     Reply #84 - March 05, 2017, 09:01 AM

    Maryam Namazie is just one heck of a wonderful human being.

    Thank you for existing, Maryam. Keep on rocking.  Afro  dance
  • Maryam Namazie speech blocked by the Student Union
     Reply #85 - March 05, 2017, 01:11 PM

    Excellent piece.
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