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 Topic: Qur'anic studies today

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  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1380 - February 11, 2017, 05:43 PM

    Teresa Bernheimer and Andrew Rippin on Gerald Hawting

    https://www.cambridge.org/core/services/aop-cambridge-core/content/view/S0041977X14001086
    Quote
    In a series of articles as well as his 1999 monograph The Idea of Idolatry and the Emergence of Islam: From Polemic to History, Hawting argues for examining Islam’s origins as the formation of a new monotheist religion, with all the implications that this brings. The book examines the religious setting within which Islam emerged, by way of a close analysis of the mushrikūn, the supposed pagan opponents to Muhammad’s message in the Quran. Hawting identifies these mushrikūn as monotheists rather than polytheists in a literal sense, and suggests a separation of the Quranic material from the later Muslim literature which developed to explain the Quran and its context: accordingly, the image of the Quranic pagans and of the jāhiliyya (the period prior to Islam, often translated as “the age of ignorance”) as described in the traditional literature should be read “primarily as a reflection of Islam’s origins which developed among Muslims during the early stages of the emergence of the new form of monotheism”.

    Hawting’s suggestions have significant consequences for our understanding of the origins of Islam, not least because the monotheist environment in which he envisages Islam to have emerged is not likely to be the Hijaz as per Muslim tradition, but an area closer to the monotheist world of the time, such as the Fertile Crescent or Iraq. Whilst some colleagues and students remain to be convinced by the arguments, or even vehemently disagree with the book’s conclusions, The Idea of Idolatry has served as a catalyst for ground-breaking work on the origins of Islam, and has been hugely influential in the study of the context of the Quran.

  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1381 - February 12, 2017, 09:58 AM

    Twitter thread: https://mobile.twitter.com/iandavidmorris/status/830544549034524673
    Quote from: Ian David Morris
    In distinct accounts about the slaves taken by early Muslim conquerors, I’m seeing the number 360 and thereabouts.

  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1382 - February 13, 2017, 11:34 AM

    Thread: https://mobile.twitter.com/ahadrx7/status/830687317455204352
    Quote
    @iandavidmorris How difficult is it for you to do your research when a few times there are multiple versions of one incident? For example...

  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1383 - February 13, 2017, 11:37 AM

    Thread: https://mobile.twitter.com/iandavidmorris/status/831081721948958721
    Quote
    Trying to find solid ground when researching the origins of the Qur'an is a bit like walking across sinking sand...

  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1384 - February 13, 2017, 03:42 PM

    I cant find the page where you posted this article but it has raised an important point.

    http://www.forbes.com/sites/realspin/2017/02/07/what-exactly-is-the-islamic-world/#60fffe785c63

    Quote
    While originally a religion and way of life, given the way the term "Islamic" is being tossed around like candy today, one could be forgiven for mistaking Islam for a country. According to particular groups both in the West as well as within the regions in which Islam has a marked presence, such as the Middle East, the people of the "Islamic" world speak the Islamic language, eat Islamic food, make Islamic films, write Islamic literature and produce Islamic art and architecture. In short, they are defined solely by a religion (which may or may not be theirs), their individual cultures and identities amounting to mere afterthoughts. Would it be easier to acknowledge the vast diversity—on every level—of the so-called "Islamic world" and the many peoples that constitute it, rather than use the term "Islamic" in every possible instance? Of course, after all, we don’t exactly use "Christendom" to define Europe and North America. But to ditch the term "Islamic" simply wouldn’t be convenient for certain groups, nor would it serve their interests.


    "I'm standing here like an asshole holding my Charles Dickens"

    "No theory,No ready made system,no book that has ever been written to save the world. i cleave to no system.."-Bakunin
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1385 - February 13, 2017, 03:56 PM

    I posted the link to that article on the 'random Islamic history' thread, and to be fair the argument also applies to my thread title there. The academics sometimes use 'Islamicate' instead for the wider culture and civilisation, and that might capture my intentions for the thread more accurately. An additional problem with talking about an 'Islamic world' in the early medieval period (perhaps until the Mongol invasions of the 13th century and the end of the Abbasid caliphate) is that in most times and places Muslims weren't in the majority. A comparison with a later period would be the Ottoman Balkans where in most places Muslims were a minority, though there were Muslim majority areas. Early medieval Syria, Egypt or Central Asia might have looked more like this. It's easy to forget that the Church of the East, based in Baghdad, and the Monophysite churches of Armenia, Syria, Egypt, Nubia and Ethiopia accounted for a large part of the early medieval Christian world. Really looking at the period in terms of a Christian world based in Europe vs. an Islamic world based in Africa and Asia is anachronistic and misleading.
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1386 - February 14, 2017, 11:30 AM

    Call for papers - SBL annual meeting 2017

    https://www.sbl-site.org/meetings/Congresses_CallForPaperDetails.aspx?MeetingId=31&VolunteerUnitId=315
    Quote
    This year's sessions will concern the topic of "Jewish-Christianity between Judaism, Christianity, and Islam." We invite proposals for papers revisiting themes related to "Jewish-Christianity" and early Islam, including historical and historiographical perspectives as well as more methodological reflections on the profits and perils of this rubric of comparison. An invited panel will focus on the function of "Jewish-Christianity" as well as Jewish converts in 18th, 19th, and early 20th scholarship on Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. In addition to these two themed sessions, there will also be an open panel; proposals are thus also welcome for papers on any topic pertaining to "Jewish-Christianity" and "Christian Judaism," broadly conceived.

  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1387 - February 16, 2017, 05:32 PM

    Unlocking the Medinan Qur’an / International workshop at Pembroke College, Oxford 19–21 March 2017

    http://www.mehdi-azaiez.org/Unlocking-the-Medinan-Qur-an-International-workshop-held-at-Pembroke-College?lang=fr
    Quote
    The surahs and passages that are commonly associated with the Medinan period of Muhammad’s life occupy a key position in the formative history of Islam. They fundamentally shaped later convictions about the paradigmatic authority of Muhammad and thereby fuelled the post-Qur’anic emergence of the hadith canon ; they constitute an important basis for Islam’s development into a religion with a strong focus on law ; and it is by and large only in Medinan texts that we find injunctions to militancy and an explicit demarcation of Islam from Judaism and Christianity. A proper comprehension of the Medinan Qur’an is thus crucially important to our understanding of Islamic religious history in general. At the same time, the Medinan surahs have proven much more recalcitrant to scholarly analysis than the texts that are customarily assigned to the Qur’an’s Meccan period. The workshop will assemble an international group of scholarly experts from doctoral students to senior professors to grapple with the Qur’an’s Medinan layer from a variety of methodological vantage points and historical premises.

  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1388 - February 17, 2017, 12:16 PM

    Here is my personal draft summary of Islam's origins. It's not an academic work but sceptical academics are the only people I trust on this topic, so I've jotted down their names for future reference. Over the years I'll add to and edit it, and please feel free to add your thoughts...

    THE QUR'AN AS A DOCUMENT

    The Qur'an cannot be a record of an entirely oral transmission (Puin, Donner). Some Qur'anic words are appropriated from purely written Syriac language (Luxemberg) and Syriac legends (Tesei). Part of the Qur'an's content originates in Palestinian Christian legends (Shoemaker). Parts originate in Iraq (?), and some parts may originate somewhere in northern Arabia (Crone).  There are at least two variant canonical versions of the Arabic Qur'an in circulation this day (Jay Smith), and we know more variants exist too. The seven oldest extant qur'ans differ from each other (Jay Smith)

    There is evidence of multiple hands compiling the Qur'an (Zaotar, on the conflicting spelling of 'Ibraham/Abraham'). Like the bible, duplicate stories occur that vary slightly in content and more importantly vary in supposedly verbatim utterances of the dramatis personae (eg. Iblis' conversations in heaven). Whether the codex happened earlier, during or later than the traditional timeframe is unclear.

    The Qur'an's audience are overwhelmingly if not entirely Christians and Jews (Crone), because the Qur'an assumes complete familiarity with biblical stories and characters. It is impossible that the Qur'an originated among pagans in Makkah and Madina.

    SPREAD OF ISLAM
    Islam spread not by "conversion or death", but surrender or death (Hoyland). Contemporary Christian sources attest this (Hoyland) and this was contemporary practice. Slaughter occurred, but slavery and subjugation were far more common. Slavery and preferential treatment increased the Muslim community's size dramatically, contemporaneous with the destruction of Persian Zoriastrian empire and faith. Early rulers were considered Arabs (Hoyland) or believers (Donner), identifying as 'Muslims' only later in time.

    ROLE OF MUHAMMAD
    Muhammad was not of primary importance in early Islam (Hoyland, Donner, Crone). The name 'Mhmd' is absent in all early and contemporary papyri documents, coins, and graffito of the early decades of 'Islam'. When the Arab empire conquers Persia and east Byziantium, a Muhammad materializes in the future by projecting a Muhammadan history into the past (Hoyland). This differs from Christianity, whose raison d'être was Jesus.

    Only during an Arab civil war does the name 'Muhammad' explicitly take hold (Hoyland). The earliest biography of Muhammad occurs centuries after his existence, and has "grave weaknesses" in its veracity (Donner). Pre-hijra stories of Muhammad are overwhelmingly legendary in character. The 'sunnah', or instructions of Muhammad, are a collection of accounts of Muhammad with little to no historical reliability.
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1389 - February 17, 2017, 08:53 PM

    Twitter thread on conference at UCL - The Origins of the Islamic State: Sovereignty and Power in the Middle Ages

    https://mobile.twitter.com/iandavidmorris/status/832188511419772928
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1390 - February 17, 2017, 11:45 PM

    I mostly agree except here:
    The name 'Mhmd' is absent in all early and contemporary papyri documents, coins, and graffito of the early decades of 'Islam'.


    Mhmd or, more frequently, Mhmt appears in the Chronicle ad 724, quoting Thomas the Priest who was a contemporary; in the Maronite Chronicle which I date to 668 CE; in Pseudo-Sebeos also datable to the early 660s in its final form. And the Khuzistan Chronicle mentions him I think. There is also memory of children born with that name, like Muhammad bin al-Ash'ath al-Kindi.
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1391 - February 28, 2017, 12:07 AM

    Ian David Morris - Mecca before Islam: 1) Diodorus and the Kaaba

    http://www.iandavidmorris.com/mecca-before-islam-1-diodorus-and-the-kaaba/

    https://mobile.twitter.com/iandavidmorris/status/836245493386739712
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1392 - March 01, 2017, 10:18 PM

    Scripts and Scripture: Writing and Religion in Arabia, 500-700 C.E. - A conference at the University of Chicago

    https://cmes.uchicago.edu/page/conference-description
    Quote
    It has long been known that in the centuries leading up to the emergence of Islam, various religions, both monotheistic and otherwise, were practiced in the Arabian peninsula. The Muslim tradition itself, for example, describes various cults devoted to the worship of diverse “pagan” divinities, and also conveys many narratives about Jewish tribes living within Muhammad’s early community and elsewhere in Arabia. For a long time scholars have also had access to Greek texts describing some pre-Islamic Arabian religious practices, to South Arabian inscriptions offering information about pagan, Jewish, and Christian religious traditions there, and to Syriac texts relating the experience of Christian communities in Arabia. The involvement of the kingdom of Axum and its Christian ruler in the political and religious life of the peninsula in the sixth century is also well established.

    Arabia in the century or so before Islam seems also to have been an area in which writing and writing systems were developing and undergoing significant change.  The ancient tradition of writing South Arabian, once widely used in what is today Yemen and, in a derived form, in northern Arabia, appears to have died out by the sixth century; but, at the beginning of the seventh century, the Arabic text of the Qur’ān, the Islamic scripture, appears to have emerged in West Arabia, written in a script that emerged from earlier Nabataean writing.  This development alone suggests that there may have existed more developed traditions of writing and of religious thought in Arabia than was commonly believed, since until recently we had precious little evidence for either.  The later Islamic reports about pre-Islamic Mecca and Arabia depict them as dominated by polytheistic animist religious cults, but this depiction seems, as we consider the Qur’ān and the scattered documentary information we now have, to be misleading.

    Recent research on the Qur’ān has argued that this text was not so much a theological response to paganism, as it was an engagement with currents in the Judeo-Christian tradition with which it disagreed (for example, the Christian notion that Jesus was God’s son and the concept of the Trinity, or the stringency of some Jewish dietary restrictions). Archaeological excavation and survey work undertaken in recent decades in and around the peninsula have brought to light new and helpful evidence, from archaeologically identified monasteries in the Gulf region, to cultic sites in Yemen and modern-day Jordan, to a plethora of inscriptions in dozens of dialects upon rock walls, monuments, burial chambers, and wooden sticks.  All of this evidence points to a richly varied religious life in Arabia during the sixth century, and hints at a burgeoning of literary activity leading up to the emergence of the Qur’ān.  In addition, the relatively recent discovery of numerous inscriptions and graffiti in Arabic dating to the period shortly after the appearance of the Qur’ān has stimulated renewed research into these questions of writing and religion.  We might pose the enigma posed by all this material in the form of a single question: “How is it that a sacred scripture, the Qur’ān, coalesced in a region that apparently lacked an established script?”

    A growing international community of scholars concerned with pre-Islamic and early Islamic Arabia is now engaged in a vigorous debate about these questions of writing and religion.  We need to know more about such basic things as the locations of the various religious communities and their relations vis-à-vis one another; the production, availability, and possible contact of sacred texts; the nature and development of local theological systems; the evolution and concomitant influence of the very languages and scripts in which religious practices and ideas were spoken, written, and transmitted; and the manner and degree to which all these Arabian phenomena were affected by factors beyond Arabia, particularly the imperial traditions of Byzantium/Rome and Persia and the powerful religious traditions of the Fertile Crescent, particularly Christianity, Judaism and Zoroastrianism.

    The conference “Writing and Religion in Arabia, 500-700 C.E.” will be convened at the University of Chicago on May 18-19 (Thursday-Friday), 2017, calling together leading scholars who deal with these questions, whether their specialization is South Arabian studies, pre-Islamic and early Islamic Arabic dialectology and epigraphy, Qur’anic studies, or Arabian archaeology.  Its goal is to generate a rich interdisciplinary discussion of these basic issues of writing and religion that provide the background to the appearance and coalescence of the Qur’an, to help place that enigmatic text into a firmer historical, linguistic, religious, and literary context.

    Presenters and Papers

    Ahmad Al-Jallad (Leiden):  "Revisiting the question of a pre-Islamic Hocharabisch from the vista of the pre-Islamic inscriptions."

    François Déroche (Paris): “The invention of the sacred book.”

    Fred M. Donner (Chicago): “Scripts and Scripture in Late Antique Arabia: an Overview of the problems.”

    Suleyman Dost (Chicago): "Language of Ritual Purity in the Qur'ān and the Arabian Epigraphy.”

    Adam Flowers (Chicago): “Writing and the Terminological Evolution of the Qur'anic ‘Sūra’."

    Sidney Griffith (Catholic Univ., Washington D.C.): "Script, Text, and the Bible in Arabic: The Evidence of the Qur'an."

    Robert Hoyland (NYU/ISAW): “Arabic Writing, Arabic Scripture in Late Roman Arabia.”

    Ilkka Lindstedt (Helsinki): “asʾalu allāh al-mawt fī sabīlihi -- Religious warfare in the epigraphic record.”

    Michael Macdonald (Oxford): "The oral and the written in the religions of ancient North Arabia."

    Laila Nehmé: “Names of deities and theophoric names in the Nabataeo-Arabic inscriptions from the Arabian peninsula”.

    Gordon Newby (Emory): “Religious Internationalism: A View Through the Eyes of Arabian Jews.”

    Christian Julien Robin (Paris):  “The Christians of Najrān.”

    Jeremy Vecchi (Chicago): “The Qurʾān and the Kaʿbah”

    Hamza Zafar (Seattle): “The Quran’s ‘Accounts of Cities’ (anbā al-qura) as Paradeigma.”

  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1393 - March 08, 2017, 08:31 AM

    Robert Hoyland - Jewish poets of Muhammad's Hijaz

    https://www.academia.edu/31756082/Jewish_Poets_of_Muhammads_Hijaz
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1394 - March 10, 2017, 11:37 AM

    Thread on the number of slaves taken and figures given in later accounts

    https://mobile.twitter.com/iandavidmorris/status/840151154268942336
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1395 - March 12, 2017, 10:13 AM

    Arietta Papaconstantinou - Review of Robert G. Hoyland, Theophilus of Edessa’s Chronicle and the Circulation of Historical Knowledge in Late Antiquity and Early Islam

    https://www.academia.edu/6148660/Review_of_Robert_G._Hoyland_Theophilus_of_Edessa_s_Chronicle_and_the_Circulation_of_Historical_Knowledge_in_Late_Antiquity_and_Early_Islam_Translated_Texts_for_Historians_57_Liverpool_2011_for_Le_Muséon_126_2013_459-65

    Thread

    https://mobile.twitter.com/iandavidmorris/status/840709802858803200
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1396 - March 13, 2017, 01:09 AM

    Thank you again Zeca,

    for this super interesting link on history  mono/polygamy:

    Quote


    Reading it, I understand that the clear case for monogamy in Judaism was made rather late, in 10-11 C under influence of Western Christianity (ME jews were much more inclined to polygamy eg Yemen, 20C). Dowry practices described in Talmud show very many parallels to Quran, so do recommendations for number of wives allowed.

    So my question remains, which societies would have been most prone to compose "the Quran" and to start living by it? A Christian dominated society or a Jewish one?

    How much would life style of Jews change going over to Islam, how much for a Christian? let´s consider circumcision, food, marriage, + later on literal interpretation of texts...

  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1397 - March 14, 2017, 07:25 PM

    Isn't it an assumption that the Quran was written compiled and edited in Arabia?

    Where might it be from? Is Quranic Arabic an invention, from a very literate place?

    Quote
    The ancient history of Yemen (South Arabia) is especially important because Yemen is one of the oldest centers of civilization in the Near East. Its relatively fertile land and adequate rainfall in a moister climate helped sustain a stable population, a feature recognized by the ancient Greek geographer Ptolemy, who described Yemen as Eudaimon Arabia (better known in its Latin translation, Arabia Felix) meaning Fortunate Arabia or Happy Arabia. Between the eighth century BCE and the sixth century CE, it was dominated by six main states which rivaled each other, or were allied with each other and controlled the lucrative spice trade: Saba', Ma'īn, Qatabān, Hadhramaut, Kingdom of Awsan, and the Himyarite Kingdom. Islam arrived in 630 CE and Yemen became part of the Muslim realm.

    wiki

    When you are a Bear of Very Little Brain, and you Think of Things, you find sometimes that a Thing which seemed very Thingish inside you is quite different when it gets out into the open and has other people looking at it.


    A.A. Milne,

    "We cannot slaughter each other out of the human impasse"
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1398 - March 14, 2017, 07:41 PM

    Isn't it an assumption that the Quran was written compiled and edited in Arabia?

    Where might it be from? Is Quranic Arabic an invention, from a very literate place?
    wiki

    Palestine, Syria and Iraq look like likelier candidates for the compilation and editing of the Qur'an and for the writing of at least its later layers. It's doubtful that Arabic was spoken in Yemen before the conquests, unless maybe by pastoralist tribes.
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1399 - March 14, 2017, 08:00 PM

    Thank you again Zeca,

    for this super interesting link on history  mono/polygamy:

    Reading it, I understand that the clear case for monogamy in Judaism was made rather late, in 10-11 C under influence of Western Christianity (ME jews were much more inclined to polygamy eg Yemen, 20C). Dowry practices described in Talmud show very many parallels to Quran, so do recommendations for number of wives allowed.

    So my question remains, which societies would have been most prone to compose "the Quran" and to start living by it? A Christian dominated society or a Jewish one?

    How much would life style of Jews change going over to Islam, how much for a Christian? let´s consider circumcision, food, marriage, + later on literal interpretation of texts...



    I'd say we're talking about a society with both Christians and Jews, with the Qur'an being more influenced by Syriac Christianity. As it was probably composed over a period of time in different places it may be better to think of societies in the plural.
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1400 - March 14, 2017, 08:12 PM

    New book



    G W Bowersock - The Crucible of Islam

    http://www.hup.harvard.edu/catalog.php?isbn=9780674057760&content=toc
    Quote
    Little is known about Arabia in the sixth century CE. Yet from this distant time and place emerged a faith and an empire that stretched from the Iberian peninsula to India. Today, Muslims account for nearly a quarter of the global population. G. W. Bowersock seeks to illuminate this most obscure and yet most dynamic period in the history of Islam—from the mid-sixth to mid-seventh century—exploring why arid Arabia proved to be such fertile ground for Muhammad’s prophetic message, and why that message spread so quickly to the wider world.

    In Muhammad’s time Arabia stood at the crossroads of great empires, a place where Christianity, Judaism, and local polytheistic traditions vied for adherents. Mecca, Muhammad’s birthplace, belonged to the part of Arabia recently conquered by the Ethiopian Christian king Abraha. But Ethiopia lost western Arabia to Persia following Abraha’s death, while the death of the Byzantine emperor in 602 further destabilized the region. Within this chaotic environment, where lands and populations were traded frequently among competing powers and belief systems, Muhammad began winning converts to his revelations. In a troubled age, his followers coalesced into a powerful force, conquering Palestine, Syria, and Egypt and laying the groundwork of the Umayyad Caliphate.

    The crucible of Islam remains an elusive vessel. Although we may never grasp it firmly, Bowersock offers the most detailed description of its contours and the most compelling explanation of how one of the world’s great religions took shape.

    Contents

    Map of Southwest Arabia, prepared by Fabrice Delrieux
    Map of the Ḥijāz, prepared by Fabrice Delrieux
    Prologue
    1. The Arabian Kingdom of Abraha
    2. Arab Paganism in Late Antiquity
    3. Late Antique Mecca
    4. Ethiopia and Arabia
    5. The Persians in Jerusalem
    6. Muḥammad and Medina
    7. Interregnum of the Four Caliphs
    8. A New Dispensation
    9. The Dome of the Rock
    Notes
    Select Bibliography
    Acknowledgments
    Index

  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1401 - March 14, 2017, 08:23 PM

    Thread on the influence of Michael Lecker

    https://mobile.twitter.com/shahanSean/status/841373893843648512
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1402 - March 14, 2017, 08:28 PM

    Thread: https://mobile.twitter.com/iandavidmorris/status/841075808458416128
    Quote
    I’ve just run through Nabia Abbott’s chapter “The Ta’rīkh al-Khulafā’ of Ibn Isḥāq” https://oi.uchicago.edu/sites/oi.uchicago.edu/files/uploads/shared/docs/oip75.pdf and I have a few early thoughts.

  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1403 - March 14, 2017, 08:59 PM

    Mecca and Medina feel like classic foundation myth stuff, possibly chosen to differentiate from Jerusalem and give a counterpoint to the Xian myths - Jesus was born in a stable, Mo is from a place with dirty water.

    When you are a Bear of Very Little Brain, and you Think of Things, you find sometimes that a Thing which seemed very Thingish inside you is quite different when it gets out into the open and has other people looking at it.


    A.A. Milne,

    "We cannot slaughter each other out of the human impasse"
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1404 - March 14, 2017, 11:05 PM

    moi, I've never been impressed with Bowersock. He does know the Late Antique Red Sea, so I give him credit for that. Unfortunately when he drifts into Islamic studies he shows his ignorance.

    Here is Tom Holland having to correct Bowersock's hot-headed review of Holland's Shadow:
    https://www.theguardian.com/books/2012/may/07/tom-holland-responds-glen-bowersock

    What are the odds a media-friendly buzzword like "Orientalism" or, worse, "Islamophobia" enters into Bowersock's new book? I'm guessing, I'll not lose money.
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1405 - March 14, 2017, 11:18 PM

    It's doubtful that Arabic was spoken in Yemen before the conquests, unless maybe by pastoralist tribes.


    Chaim Rabin would have us take Himyaritic for Araboid. That is, a Northwest Arabian language (like Safaitic) drifting south and settling among the Sabaeans.
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1406 - March 14, 2017, 11:30 PM

    I suspect that Bowersock's intended definitive volume is going to be parenthetically (depressing).

    Basically a mildly upgraded version of Watt.

    On the other hand, it will probably sell well, particularly for use in undergraduate general ed courses.
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1407 - March 15, 2017, 12:07 AM

    I've only read Bowersock's 'The Throne of Adulis' which has interesting material along with some uncritical acceptance of traditional narratives. I may buy the new book anyway.
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1408 - March 15, 2017, 12:10 AM

    If nothing else, it may have some good new material on Ethiopia and South Arabia.
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #1409 - March 15, 2017, 12:28 AM

    It's also reasonably priced which may help me tolerate the parts I disagree with.
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