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 Topic: Pakistani atheist girls seeking help

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  • Pakistani atheist girls seeking help
     OP - March 11, 2011, 01:26 PM

    Shortened version: Two Pakistani girls become atheists, mother finds out and threatens to kill them, ends up locking them up in the house. Girls manage to escape by travelling to Sri Lanka on a month-long tourist visa and are now seeking help in claiming asylum to another country. They are now asking people to raise awareness of their case and help them move to another country.

    Here's their facebook pages:

    http://www.facebook.com/home.php?sk=group_160278834027275&ap=1

    Long version:

    Quote
    At first, I am posting the newspaper article links and a brief video media interview based on our story. I am also jotting down a detailed version of our story, which i tried making as brief as possible. Please anyone who able to lend us, some nifty advice or anything, do get in touch. Any sort of help would be appreciated.
    news paper links on our story :
    http://www.thesundayleader.lk/2011/02/20/fleeing-from-home-fighting-for-freedom-pakistani-sisters-seek-religious-asylum-in-sri-lanka/
    http://www.dawn.com/2011/02/20/pakistani-sisters-get-unhcr-protection-in-lanka.html
    http://ko.offroadpakistan.com/escapees-from-the-land-of-the-pure/
    brief media video interview on our ordeal :
    http://www.newsnow.lk/index.php?option=com_jomtube&view=video&id=63&Itemid=75
                 DETAILED VERSION OF OUR STORY
    We are two sisters on the run, to save ourselves, from the very people , that in the conventional society would be referred to as ''Family''. We were born in an ultra-conservative Muslim family in United Arab Emirates, Abu Dhabi. My younger sister was born in the year 1994, and I in 1988. Our family is originally from Pakistan; hence, that makes us Pakistanis. I was a victim of severe childhood abuse till the age of 13, my parents being the abusers. My mother was an extremist and always wanted control of our lives and if things weren’t done her way, if we didn’t oblige, we’d suffer the consequences through beatings. Just to quote a few of her beating rituals; she’d dunk my little brother and my face in the toilet, threatening to kill us at that very instant if we didn’t promise to abide by her rules. At another instance , she grabbed my tongue and held a knife in her hand, and told me that she’d cut if off and peel off my face to the extent that no one would be able to recognize me , if I were to ever have a bite of food again. We are three siblings, and we all got our beatings for different reasons. I was beaten, just because I was overweight as a kid and that to them was not acceptable because according to them, it meant, that I’d have a hard time finding a suitable partner, which by the Islamic law they would find for me. My sister on the other hand was beaten for having a sharp tongue, even though she was the youngest, nevertheless she was aware of what was going on. My brother would be beaten up because he aspired to be a soccer player instead of becoming an Engineer or a Doctor or any profession that was respectable in their eyes. Us sisters would never get beaten by our father, instead he would stick to verbal abuse, in public , as well as at times like family dinners. My mother had three brothers and three sisters. One of the brothers and one of her sisters had molested, three of my first cousin’s, and I became aware of this when I was 14, as my cousins had warned me to stay cautious for myself and my sister. Both of us never got molested from the family, but we got molested by people outside the family. I never discussed my case with our parents, and these were the last people I could rely on. My sister’s case on the other hand, was reported to the police and I believe the case is still on-going. Now I want to jot down the most current events that came into play, leaving me no choice but to flee the country. After being a victim of severe childhood abuse at home, sexual harassment in public and at my university back in Pakistan, at the age of18 I got my chance to go to Royal Holloway University of London, England, to graduate. By the year 2010, I had completed 2 years of my Computer Science course. Spending time away from my parents helped me discover myself and things I truly believed in. I was no longer a Muslim, rather an Agnostic. My little sister on the other hand, started questioning the idea of God at the very tender age of 12 and gave up religion and stopped believing in God at the age of 13. This was something we kept discreet, as if our family was to find out about any of it, they would have locked us up. Moreover by this time, how our parents treated and dealt with both of us, and our brother had completely changed. They now support him with his dream of being a cricketer , whereas, our dreams are futile and meaningless to them , as at the end of the day all they care about is for us two to be wedded to wealthy families. After having completed 2 years at the University, I had decided to take a gap year, before graduating, in order to pursue my dream of becoming a performer (singer, songwriter) instead. I had planned on using the tuition fee for the third year, provided by our parents, and strictly saw it as a loan that I would return overtime, to enroll myself in a music college. Our family is one of wealth and I couldn’t come forth with this desire of mine as in our family’s eyes it was sin and something that would completely devastate the family’s honor. Also over the time spent in England, I had met a Polish man, Lukasz Sitkowski , and we had planned to elope soon, though when I mentioned it to my mother, she didn’t find it acceptable as he was an Atheist and wanted him and his family to convert to Islam first , if I was to marry him. I was no longer a virgin and this was something again my family was and still is unaware of. If they were to find out that I no longer was a virgin, I’d be stoned to death. My sister and I would always communicate with one another through e-mail, and Skype. Our mother hired a computer guy to find out what it was that we discussed most of the time. Through him, she found out about my future plans, along with the fact that I was an agnostic, and my sister an Atheist. She never uttered a word of it to anyone. During the summer of 2010, I didn’t want to come back, thus I didn’t. I worked as a waitress at Nandos instead. I didn’t tell our parents about my job as a waitress at Nandos, because to them, again, it was something that was condescending and scorned upon by the family. Therefore, I told our parents that I was doing an internship in the I.T department. My mother convinced me to visit for 2 weeks, using our fathers’ made-up illness as a mere excuse to visit. I expressed to my sister that my instincts lead me to believe that something unfortunate awaited me in Pakistan. Regardless, I silenced the voices in my head, and chose to visit, because I wanted to see her. During this period of time, our brother, who too was studying in London, had come to visit our parents, as well. My sister arrived in Pakistan on the 4th of September,2010. After a week, she realized that her passport was missing. Our mother made us believe that it was stolen at the airport, or that my sister was a victim of black magic, and that ‘’Jins’’ (spiritual beings known to Muslims) had misplaced it. After two weeks, since the disappearance of the passport, my sister, was convinced that our mother had the passport, and had us almost believe a lie. Our mother had gone to the extent of advertising for the lost passport in the newspapers. As to my sisters’ suspicion, we found the lost passport, in her storage space. She called my brother right away, and let him know that our mother had stolen it. He believed us right away. We had had thought that our father wasn’t involved in the whole situation, thus, we planned on telling him that we had found the passport. When they returned from the airport, we told him. He ended up strangling me, because I wouldn’t give up my passport. They managed to take away the passport anyhow. I had suffered several minor bruises. My mother told us that “Allah” had lead her to all of this and not her nosiness. My father told me sister dishonored the family by merely being a waitress at Nandos. Our mother on the other hand told us that she desired to kill both of us; me for wanting to become a performer and being an Agnostic, as that was seen as a sin and something ‘’haram’’ (Impermissible) in Islam, and my little sister, for being an Atheist. She said it would be the right thing to do to save us from the fire of hell, and also to help us avoid the committing these so-called sins in her eyes. For two straight months, we were on a curfew. They had 6 servants working for them, and they were all strictly instructed that none of us was to be allowed to leave the house. During these two months, we didn’t leave our room. After two months, one of our first cousins’ named ‘’Osama’’ came for a visit. After a short period of time, in his presence, they allowed us to go out, and we availed this opportunity to the maximum. I applied for a new passport, and received it. Over the next month, we kept planning our escape, including our source of funds, all the documents we needed such as our birth certificates, passports etc. Over time, we found exactly where each document was placed in her room. My sisters’ boyfriend tried getting a loan for us, but it didn’t work out. Being desperate, as nothing seemed to fall into place, we planned to steal her gold jewelry. We discussed the fact that if countries for their freedom kill and plunder, because our means justified our end; that being freedom of speech, expression, and thought. We managed to sell the jewelry and receive enough money to escape. We knew we wouldn’t have enough time to apply for the visa once we were out of the house, because they would track us down. My mothers’ brother knew a lot of politicians, and the head of the police department. They had bribed them before, and had asked them for many favors previously, and the police would do so, again without question. We decided to go to Sri Lanka on a one month tourist visa that would be given to us on arrival. We escaped on the 28th of January, and now reside in Sri Lanka. As we suspected, our mothers’ brother contacted the head of the police department, and the head of the ministry of interior, and, convinced them to put us on the Exit Control List (ECL). This meant that we wouldn’t be allowed to leave Pakistan, if we even tried. Fortunately, it was issued the day of our escape, so it was too late. They have sent us a threat to contact them, and told us that if we do, they will help take our names off the ECL list. We still have the mail as proof. Our visa for Sri Lanka expires within less than a month. Once I received the mail, I had no option but to contact UNHCR and seek for asylum, as I though that being on the ECL wouldn’t allow me to get approved for any sort of visa for, any foreign country. Our case at the moment with UNHCR is pending, though due to undue pressure from the Pakistani government, brought on, because of my uncle being influential with the Pakistani government; our application was made a priority. The UNHCR usually takes about 5 to 6 months to call in for an interview, and we were called within a month. I don’t know whether that is in our favor or not, as I am aware that there exist a comradery between Sri Lanka and Pakistan, hence I fear, that I application might get rejected. Now the current situation is that, my uncle and my mother, arrived in Colombo, looking for us on the 4th February. The contacted the tourist police, and made up the story that me and my sister came to Sri lanka for touring purposes and are now missing. The police managed to track us down, but after having shown them the asylum seeker certificate issued to us by the UNHCR, they backed off. During this period, we were forced to confront our mother at the police station, and she denied to have done anything and threatened me that I would never be able to leave Sri lanka and that she would stay here until I am here. My younger sister is 16, a minor, and my parents are her legal guardians. My mother now wants to take my sister back and use her as a bargaining chip to get me back to Pakistan as well, as that is the only card she has left to play. She will torture her, and her knowing how much I love my sister, would come back to save her and so they will have both of us back in Pakistan. At present there is a court case going on where me and my mother are fighting for my sister custody. The next date is on the 14th of march. My sister and I , just want a chance at life , at freedom, and the opportunity to be able to make something of our lives. We need advise on what should we do and if there is a possibility , that me and my sister can somehow settle in the UK , without declaring asylum either in Sri lanka or in the UK. We are capable enough to make something out of our lives , if given a chance. We are fighting hard for our freedom and we really need help. We have limited funds, but enough to spend a few months in the UK, until we manage to get jobs. But the real problem is how do we get to the UK?. Please for all who would be reading this, we need a helping hand, advice , anything that can help us. Any response from any one of you would be appreciated.We need to be heard by all governments, and we need help with spreading out the word. I’m trying to get hold of news channels like CNN and BBC, but it might take time.
    I've created facebook a group and a page, briefing on our struggle. Please, do join the group and LIKE the page, I am pasting the links below. We really need the media's support.
    again please to LIKE the page : http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=528997345#!/pages/Two-girls-fighting-for-freedom-in-desperate-need-of-help/131194006951690?sk=wall
    the group:
    http://www.facebook.com/home.php?sk=group_160278834027275&ap=1


    http://www.reddit.com/r/IAmA/comments/g1v1c/we_are_pakistani_atheist_girls_born_in_a_muslim/

    19:46   <zizo>: hugs could pimp u into sex

    Quote from: yeezevee
    well I am neither ex-Muslim nor absolute 100% Non-Muslim.. I am fucking Zebra

  • Re: Pakistani atheist girls seeking help
     Reply #1 - March 11, 2011, 04:22 PM

    Good luck to them.

    I reckon we'll be seeing more of these kinds of asylum cases based on people rejecting Islam and facing persecution, in particular from Pakistan.

    If they get to the UK though they might still feel intimidated and inhibited from speaking out given the climate of fear ex Muslims face and the betrayal of ex Muslims by large parts of Left wing and liberal society here.


    "we can smell traitors and country haters"


    God is Love.
    Love is Blind. Stevie Wonder is blind. Therefore, Stevie Wonder is God.

  • Re: Pakistani atheist girls seeking help
     Reply #2 - March 11, 2011, 04:33 PM

    Not if they come in large enough numbers, get organized and militant about defending themselves, billy. The only things lefty liberals are good for are criminal defense and immigration lawyers anyways.

    fuck you
  • Re: Pakistani atheist girls seeking help
     Reply #3 - March 11, 2011, 04:40 PM

    Damnnnnnn...... I really wish there was something I could do to help them.
  • Re: Pakistani atheist girls seeking help
     Reply #4 - March 11, 2011, 04:54 PM

    This story is nuts really, a complete horror story...
  • Re: Pakistani atheist girls seeking help
     Reply #5 - March 11, 2011, 04:57 PM

    Especially their mother sounds like this sort of psycho:



    I really hope things work out for those girls..
  • Re: Pakistani atheist girls seeking help
     Reply #6 - March 11, 2011, 05:08 PM

    Seriously stop.

    18:42   Godot   the laffy taffy, and it's many dense layers of rich metaphors - that of asses, and that of candy, and of shaking
  • Re: Pakistani atheist girls seeking help
     Reply #7 - March 11, 2011, 05:54 PM

    Pakistani sisters Asmaa and Fatima speak to News Now.lk about their ordeal to flee from their allegedly abusive parents and their attempt to obtain asylum in Sri Lanka

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qZdNixWLySw


    Zee  what a  girl ., she is really brave.,  I think her mother is controlled by some one else.   I am glad some one is helping these girls in  Srilanka

    Freedom of Expression is a Fundamental Right  
    Release The bloggers from Jails.  Protect The Bloggers from  Baboons
  • Re: Pakistani atheist girls seeking help
     Reply #8 - March 11, 2011, 06:01 PM

    ^ thanks for the vid, yeezevee.  Afro

    19:46   <zizo>: hugs could pimp u into sex

    Quote from: yeezevee
    well I am neither ex-Muslim nor absolute 100% Non-Muslim.. I am fucking Zebra

  • Re: Pakistani atheist girls seeking help
     Reply #9 - March 11, 2011, 06:12 PM

    ^ thanks for the vid, yeezevee.  Afro

      what??  You  thank yourself GodIsNotGreat., it is from your link

    I was thinking, the girl's mother is under black magic.,  but it seem seems you and that  Archbishop of Canterbury  Rowan Williams  too under that white magic.  dear GodIsNotGreat  .lol..

    Jinn Exorcism in the UK
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Jr_ZvFq1DI

    Freedom of Expression is a Fundamental Right  
    Release The bloggers from Jails.  Protect The Bloggers from  Baboons
  • Re: Pakistani atheist girls seeking help
     Reply #10 - March 11, 2011, 06:56 PM

    Quote
    Jinn Exorcism in the UK


    Fucking hell.

    Put your head in your hands and despair.


    "we can smell traitors and country haters"


    God is Love.
    Love is Blind. Stevie Wonder is blind. Therefore, Stevie Wonder is God.

  • Re: Pakistani atheist girls seeking help
     Reply #11 - March 11, 2011, 07:48 PM

    Pakistani sisters get UNHCR `protection` in Lanka  says news about that case..
    http://www.dawn.com/2011/02/20/pakistani-sisters-get-unhcr-protection-in-lanka.html

    Quote
    COLOMBO, Feb 19: The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) has given protection to two Pakistani sisters who fled their country last month after accusing their parents of persecution.

    Asma Azeem (22) and Fatima Azeem (16), who have been staying in the Sri Lankan capital since arriving here almost 20 days ago, told Dawn they fear their parents might use their “political connections” in Pakistan to pressure Colombo to send them home.

    The sisters` mother and her brother filed a petition in a Colombo court for custody of the sisters. They also said Asma and Fatima had stolen gold from their own home. The girls admitted to stealing gold.

    But the court dismissed the petition and barred the mother and the uncle from visiting the girls till March 14.

    “I admit that I took the gold. It was the only way to get out (of Pakistan) and get the freedom I want. When I start earning I will pay it back, with interest,” Asma said. Dawn

    Asma, who studied computer science at universities in Pakistan and Britain, told that she and Fatima aspired to becoming singers, but since their parents would not allow them to go abroad for studying music, they decided to escape the “repressive atmosphere”.

    That mother is monster ..fucking stupid.. She lost her two girls and she is looking for lost gold??  I bet it is uncles of those girls playing the game.    Dammit where is the father?? Under Burkha??

    Freedom of Expression is a Fundamental Right  
    Release The bloggers from Jails.  Protect The Bloggers from  Baboons
  • Re: Pakistani atheist girls seeking help
     Reply #12 - March 11, 2011, 08:17 PM

    What an incredible story
    Quote
    Asmaa Azeem is 22, Fatima is 16. They are sisters from Pakistan, seeking asylum in Sri Lanka. Their parents are religious fundamentalists and the girls want out. They want an end to the abuse, they want an end to the old religious order and they want a life of freedom; freedom of thought, freedom of expression and more importantly, freedom of religion. The girls are atheists, and proud ones.

    Quote
    “From a very young age, the physical abuse began. My mother would hold a knife to my face and threaten to deface me, to cut my tongue, so no one would recognise me and I wouldn’t be able to talk.” Asmaa is the oldest of three siblings. Her story began 14 years ago when she, her mother, and her two younger siblings – a boy and Fatima – moved back from Abu Dhabi to Pakistan, leaving their father, an engineer with the Pakistani military by profession, behind. It was then that the abuse that Asmaa suspects was fuelled by unhappiness and frustration began, leading to the siblings being verbally, physically and emotionally abused by a mother that wrapped tightly around her the comforting shroud of religious fundamentalism.

    The result was enforced rules, threats, beatings and punishments. The siblings were locked up in a dark storage room, threatened mutilation with knives, told they would never amount to anything, that their dreams would never come true. Religion was the one way of life, and ‘Allah’ the only God. Everything must happen according to the Quran and their mother was always right. Naturally, the children rebelled, and Asmaa, the first to.

    She said she began questioning the religious, cultural and social dogmas enforced on her life at about the age of 16. Why? was her first question.
    Quote
    Why was a Muslim man allowed to have more than one wife (Her uncle has one in the UK and one in Pakistan) and a woman not? Why did the ‘society’ she was brought up in, choose to turn a blind eye and even deny issues and incidents that took place right in its face? (She describes the sexual molestation a cousin went through at the hands of an uncle)  Why did women have no fundamental rights in her country? Why, why and more why?

    At around the same time Asmaa had the good fortune to visit Malaysia for three months. Her eyes were opened even wider then and by 17, she said, she no longer believed in God; he didn’t exist, and she wasn’t interested. She details how she went through the motions of praying five times a day and continued to wear long clothes to cover her body in order to keep her mother at bay, but said that resentment had begun to burn deep in her heart. The girls had their own dreams: Asmaa wants to sing, and Fatima wants to write, but their mother will have none of it, it is not allowed.

    Quote
    At 18 Asmaa left to the United Kingdom on studies choosing a ‘useful’ major she didn’t even care much for, as it allowed her – for the time being at least — the freedom to live in a religiously, culturally and even socially liberal country. She spent her time studying and working part time as a waitress and was soon followed by her brother (who is still there). Fatima however was in still in Pakistan, and alone. In spite of her new found freedom, Asmaa said she worried about her sister. Fatima was depressed and even suicidal, and Asmaa spent hours on Skype, just talking, to her sister. Fatima had by that time indeed slid into depression. She was alone and had virtually no relationship with her mother. Channels of communication between mother and daughter were closed; religious fundamentalism left no room for questions. And Fatima had plenty of them. Like her sister before her she had begun to question and inwardly rebel. She didn’t like the rules enforced on her by her mother, they made no sense. She spent much of her time on the internet, engaging in social media, talking to her sister.

    Back in the United Kingdom Asmaa had decided that she wanted to pursue her dream of singing. She chatted to her sister about her interest in auditioning for the X Factor and toyed with the idea of dropping out of school and using the money her parents were sending for her studies in computer science to enroll in music school. Little did they know at the time, they say, that their mother had gained access to Fatima’s PC and that their saved conversations would be used against them.

    On September 3, 2010 Asmaa was called back to Pakistan by her mother who said that her father was ill. Asmaa was more concerned about her sister; Fatima had sunk lower into her depression and begun to self-mutilate and self-medicate, all – at the time – unknown to her parents. She had made the mistake of telling a school friend she didn’t believe in God and the story had spread, as a result of which she was being shunned in school and many had stopped speaking to her.  Fatima was afraid she would never be free and felt she had no reason to live, and Asmaa decided to use the opportunity that presented itself to go back.


    Shorty after arriving in Pakistan Asmaa’s passport went missing. Initially helpful and concerned, their mother had helped the girls in their search for it, before telling Asmaa that she suspected the ‘jinns’ had stolen it and that ‘Allah’ possibly wanted her to stay back in Pakistan. Her father too suggested she finish her last year of study in Pakistan and not go back. By this time Asmaa was sure her parents were responsible for the ‘loss’ of her passport and was livid. She knew they were playing her and felt they insulted her intelligence by expecting her to believe that it was ‘Allah’ or the ‘jinns’ that had ulterior motives.
    Quote
    “It’s like an ‘Allah’ bandage”  Fatima said bitterly, ‘ Every time anything goes wrong or in any way they don’t want it to go, they put on the Allah bandage; Allah said this, Allah said that.”

    The sisters searched the house and found the passport hidden, ironically in the very storeroom in which they had often been locked in as children. Their confronted parents were quick to get physical and both girls’ passports were confiscated and they were grounded. Six people employed as help in the house were asked to keep an eye on them at all times, and they were not let out of the house. This lasted for about two months, Asmaa said, describing how she had her wallet and national ID card hidden on her body at all times, just to keep them safe.


    In the two months they were kept under house arrest by their parents, the girls hatched a plan. Asmaa was 22 and so, at a legal age to leave. She realised that she would have to leave the country; there was no place for atheism or modernism or liberalism there, they would not let her be. But she couldn’t leave her sister behind; Fatima at 16 was still a minor. They would have to find a country that would not require visas to travel to. A quick search on the internet showed Nepal and Sri Lanka to be prime candidates.

    They chose Sri Lanka. The girls had no money of their own and no way of earning any either. It was at this point that Asmaa decided that she would ‘take’ some of the gold her mother had always promised would be hers, to buy their way out. The girls left the house on a planned date — when their mother was out — and travelled to Karachi instead of using the Lahore Airport that was closer to home, so afraid that they would be followed.


    After a number of hiccups the girls finally arrived in Sri Lanka on January 28. Visiting the UNHCR office at the BIA, they obtained papers validating their refugee status before picking up a Mobitel SIM at the counter of the BIA and travelling to Colombo. Days later their mother and an uncle were at the entrance of the rooms they had temporarily rented out, asking the landlord for them, and casually, if they had left any ‘documents’ behind.
    Quote
    According to Asela Rekewa, the criminal lawyer representing the two girls, the mother Qudsia Azeem (Khanum) and uncle Irfan Malik had arrived in Sri Lanka hot on their heels and had made an entry with the Tourist Police in Negombo, saying the girls were ‘missing.’ OIC, Tourist Police, Officer Jayaruwan had accompanied the two adults to Colombo in investigating the entry, but had found that the girls had papers issued to them by the UNHCR validating their refugee status, and that therefore there was nothing he could do.


    The girls had next received a call from the UNHCR asking them to make an entry at the Women and Children’s Bureau at Fort. En route the girls learned – from the UNHCR themselves – their mother and uncle were at the Women and Children’s Bureau. At the Bureau the girls found that they had been called to make a statement in response to an entry made by their mother and uncle, and were not required to file an entry themselves.
    Rekewa speculated if there had been any miscommunication between the UNHCR and the girls, and if there was any undue pressure on officials and authorities by their parents. He said the girls had spent two days at the UNHCR office making their statement to officials. “From what I know, these processes take a while,” he said. “I am truly surprised that the UNHCR has decided to question them this quickly and hope that it doesn’t result adversely on the two girls.”


    He also voiced his concern on the parents being accompanied on at least one of their journeys in looking for the girls by former Colombo Deputy Mayor Azad Sally. How had the parents found out where the girls had been staying in Colombo? There are a number of unanswered questions.

    Quote
    Asmaa and Fatima are evidently worried. They say their uncle is extremely influential in Pakistan and has many contacts with top officials and the Ministry of Interior. They show me an email — sent to them on the very day they left home – to which a letter requesting the two girls be placed immediately on the Exit Control List to prevent them from leaving the country was attached. The email was from their uncle, saying: “I am just sending you this document to let you know that I’m not bluffing you…”


    They worry that calls made on their Mobitel SIM have been traced and say that they hear the Ministry of Justice and the Pakistani High Commission have expressed interest in their case. They worry about their future; will they ever live normally?  Would they be able to get visas in the future, to go abroad, to live their dreams, live free?

    We don’t know what will happen,” they say, “But we have decided that we won’t keep quiet. There are other girls and women like us out there, and they must know that they can be free. We are worried our uncle and parents will use what influence they have to pressure Sri Lankan authorities and officials to deny our application. But we hope that won’t happen. We have been lucky so far, and we don’t want to ever go back.”

    That is incredible story. What a big sister.. what an intelligent girl.  I wish i had the power of UN and the force of US of A,   I want to replace ZARDARI with Asmaa Azeem  and give her every resource to run Pakistan..

    Freedom of Expression is a Fundamental Right  
    Release The bloggers from Jails.  Protect The Bloggers from  Baboons
  • Re: Pakistani atheist girls seeking help
     Reply #13 - March 11, 2011, 08:20 PM

    Time for my Future organization Council of Ex Muslims of USA to do something

    Fight on the Oppression my fellow Ex Muslims!!!
  • Re: Pakistani atheist girls seeking help
     Reply #14 - March 11, 2011, 08:21 PM

    I like how you highlighted 'allah bandage' Tongue.

    But yea, its a crazy story.
  • Re: Pakistani atheist girls seeking help
     Reply #15 - March 12, 2011, 07:27 AM


    It seems that one of the sisters has posted here:

    http://www.councilofexmuslims.com/index.php?topic=14987.new#new


    "we can smell traitors and country haters"


    God is Love.
    Love is Blind. Stevie Wonder is blind. Therefore, Stevie Wonder is God.

  • Re: Pakistani atheist girls seeking help
     Reply #16 - March 12, 2011, 04:32 PM

    Ugh. I was at the One Law For All conference today. I completely forgot to tell either Maryam or Anne about what's happening with you two. I'll email them both and see if they can help you out.

    19:46   <zizo>: hugs could pimp u into sex

    Quote from: yeezevee
    well I am neither ex-Muslim nor absolute 100% Non-Muslim.. I am fucking Zebra

  • Re: Pakistani atheist girls seeking help
     Reply #17 - March 12, 2011, 04:36 PM

    Ugh. I was at the One Law For All conference today. I completely forgot to tell either Maryam or Anne about what's happening with you two. I'll email them both and see if they can help you out.

    yes you must do that dear GodIsNotGreat., Also we should let the Atheist and Humanist organizations know the plight these  two  wonderful sisters., Any country every country with a  bit of commonsense in the head of those heads should be able to exchange couple to REAL Muhammad following Muslims to to these two sisters..

    Freedom of Expression is a Fundamental Right  
    Release The bloggers from Jails.  Protect The Bloggers from  Baboons
  • Re: Pakistani atheist girls seeking help
     Reply #18 - March 12, 2011, 04:59 PM

    ^done.

    19:46   <zizo>: hugs could pimp u into sex

    Quote from: yeezevee
    well I am neither ex-Muslim nor absolute 100% Non-Muslim.. I am fucking Zebra

  • Re: Pakistani atheist girls seeking help
     Reply #19 - March 12, 2011, 05:43 PM

    Someone ought to write to PZ Myers, he's the man to send this kind of stuff to. May be someone can post a generic letter which we can all copy, and email to him individually?


  • Re: Pakistani atheist girls seeking help
     Reply #20 - March 17, 2011, 01:39 AM

    We've posted the online petition. Everybody, LIKE EVERBODY,  PLEASE help us get as many followers as you can and do sign the petition yourself.

    http://www.ipetitions.com/petition/twogirlsfightingfortheirfreedom/
  • Re: Pakistani atheist girls seeking help
     Reply #21 - March 19, 2011, 03:38 AM

    I find the claims that being an atheist ex-Muslim in Pakistan is almost death, that is a load of nonsense from personal experience. I have been to Pakistan twice now, though I have never said I am an Ex-Muslim I have had fruitful debates with Muslims there. I've even debated a group of Muslim guys in an internet cafe on a regular basis. Though I tame by debating style a little.

    Maybe, it was because I was a guy pretty much from a powerful family, and no one decided to report be to the police or attack me. Or maybe it was that I actually went to the rich areas of town so only came across the elite educated classes, I don't know. But I was not killed or attacked.   
  • Re: Pakistani atheist girls seeking help
     Reply #22 - March 19, 2011, 03:45 AM

    Though I don't doubt the girls story above if stuff gets politicized that can happen in Pakistan, it is the mob mentality. Sri Lanka is not a good place for Pakistanis running from Pakistan, basically the Pakistani Army trains the Sri Lankan army and the intelligence, and have very good relations.
  • Re: Pakistani atheist girls seeking help
     Reply #23 - March 19, 2011, 03:51 AM

    After reading this story once more, personally (and this is my opinion) some things don't add up, I will contact Sri Lanka government to get this verified soon.
  • Re: Pakistani atheist girls seeking help
     Reply #24 - March 19, 2011, 07:07 AM

    After reading this story once more, personally (and this is my opinion) some things don't add up,..

    Tut you should have known by now  the place of 16 to 21 year old girls in Islam dominated families.  Even things don't add up,  The fact they left their RICH  home  tells me the problems they are facing. The 21 year old may go away, how can she take a 16 year old with her to a foreign country if their family and parents are loving and caring folks?

    Freedom of Expression is a Fundamental Right  
    Release The bloggers from Jails.  Protect The Bloggers from  Baboons
  • Re: Pakistani atheist girls seeking help
     Reply #25 - March 19, 2011, 07:41 AM

    Though I don't doubt the girls story above if stuff gets politicized that can happen in Pakistan, it is the mob mentality. Sri Lanka is not a good place for Pakistanis running from Pakistan, basically the Pakistani Army trains the Sri Lankan army and the intelligence, and have very good relations.

    Yes, exactly.. The level of power definitely matters. Also it depends on how you talk to people. If you act like sissy, and they have stronger voice then you do, they can walk all over you.. Also direct families would be pain in the ass if they can not reconcile with your apostasy. In this case specially, they are very young girls, and definitely are in problem.

    Admin of following facebook pages and groups:
    Islam's Last Stand (page)
    Islam's Last Stand (group)
    and many others...
  • Re: Pakistani atheist girls seeking help
     Reply #26 - February 26, 2012, 03:38 PM

    So, uh, has anyone heard from them recently?

    قل للمليحة في الخمار الأسود
    مـاذا فـعــلت بــناسـك مـتـعـبد

    قـد كـان شـمّر لــلـصلاة ثـيابه
    حتى خـطرت له بباب المسجد

    ردي عليـه صـلاتـه وصيـامــه
    لا تـقــتـلــيه بـحـق ديــن محمد
  • Re: Pakistani atheist girls seeking help
     Reply #27 - February 26, 2012, 04:49 PM

    Same, would like to hear some news about this...
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