Skip navigation
Sidebar -

Advanced search options →

Welcome

Welcome to CEMB forum.
Please login or register. Did you miss your activation email?

Recent Posts


Quran 24.31
Today at 10:31 AM

Islamophobia campaign
Today at 10:21 AM

On Katie Hopkins' latest ...
by zeca
Today at 09:44 AM

divorce and children
by suki
Today at 09:19 AM

Split from Ex Quranist
Today at 09:18 AM

So I'm gay and..
Today at 08:53 AM

UK Election 2015
by Nowt
Today at 08:32 AM

UKIP's Anne-Marie Waters ...
Today at 08:29 AM

Funny/Cool/Interesting me...
Today at 08:29 AM

Movies you watched and wo...
Today at 08:26 AM

Homosexuality
Today at 08:01 AM

Daisy Chain
Today at 01:33 AM

Donations

Kitty is lost

Theme Changer

Welcome to the CEMB forum

Opinions expressed in the forum do not necessarily represent the views of the Council of Ex-Muslims.
Only official CEMB statements represent the organisation's position on any matter.
On a public forum, a range of views will be aired. It is necessary to allow this so issues can be discussed.
The Council cannot be held responsible for the views of others.
Our current forum membership includes ex-Muslims, Muslims and people who have never been Muslims.
Membership of this forum is open to anyone, and the staff are happy to assist with any questions you may have.
If you are offended by the use of expletives please be aware that this site does not offer word filtering.
We assume that anyone wishing to avoid expletives on the internet will have already installed their own filters.

European Union Residents - Please read our cookie policy page.
Council of Ex-Muslims of Britain - Official Resources Ex-Muslims: Know your Rights
Covering your Internet Tracks
Guidelines for Ex-Muslims and Frontline Practitioners
Come and join us on Twitter | on YouTube | on Facebook
Other organisations - UK and International support resources
Reminder Links - Forum rules - Contact the staff - Registration agreement

Useful videos







Double standards...



All credit to Jesus and Mo.


Featured Posts


THIS is the inevitable consequence of promoting faith, the belief in something with no evidence. Especially in gods of ancient barbaric times.

The insistence and demand among society in general that religious belief and ideas, however absurd, should be automatically especially respected and protected from criticism, scrutiny, questioning, mockery, ridicule and insult if need be, is a comfortable environment for extreme beliefs to take root.

While I am in no way claiming that religious people are directly responsible for what is happening in Iraq, and in other issues where religion plays a detrimental part, but I think religious people and those who promote faith as a virtue, and something to be encouraged, often with government and societal support,  need to take a long hard look at their religions.

Moderate and benign religious people in our comfortable democratic liberal societies, who are free to pick and chose what part of religion they want to follow, who I am sure are as horrified and appalled by what is happening in Iraq, Syria etc, as we are, must now begin to accept that by promoting faith they are unwittingly and unintentionally setting the scene for such extreme groups, to blossom.

The average religious person who claims to gain comfort from their religion as they think they will go to heaven and enjoy eternal youth with all their loved ones, MUST now realise that this same religion that they insist must be respected, is also simultaneously getting people beheaded, medical assistance refused, children killed for witchcraft, mass kidnappings, terrorism, other atrocities and injustices, and all sorts of messed up dangerous thinking, in other poorer, less educated, and unstable parts of the world.

So as the lucky religious people who live in 'the west' get to enjoy meeting grandma in the afterlife and lovely fables about nativities and magic angels to make us feel all soft and fluffy, many poor sods elsewhere are getting their heads detached, genetically mutilated, denied medical treatment, beaten and ostracised, lack education, and are psychologically traumatised.

The 'benefits' of religious faith (believing things without evidence) are  unproven and minimal AT BEST, whereas the disadvantages, are tragic, real and all too measurable.

Religious people and accommodationists need to get out of the idea as a society that faith is something to be encouraged.

Rant over.




If God does exist, then he already understands why we do not believe in him. He made it that way. He must want it that way. He gave us minds that are capable of distinguishing fact from bullshit, then deliberately made his religion sound like bullshit.

He made the sacred texts of his religion sound virtually indistinguishable from fairytales, and made sure that there were plenty of scientific errors, historical inaccuracies, and examples of some of the most inhumane and brutal torture tactics ever recorded all sprinkled evenly through out.

He made evolution make perfect sense and placed all the evidence for it to fit perfectly where it would need to be were it true, from the fossil record to DNA to the geographic diversity of the species.

He chose to send his messages at a time when humanity was technologically and socially backwards, and to a part of the world that was among the most backwards, then requires us to stay backwards in order to apply his will.

And lastly, after making his religion seem completely unbelievable, he made salvation contingent upon doing the one thing that we can not choose to do: believing. We can not make a choice to believe in things that we honestly do not think are true.

Even if we were to DO all of the things that religions ask of us, if we do not BELIEVE and SUPPORT 100% of the nonsense, 100% of the errors, 100% of the atrocities, 100% of the inaccuracies, then there is no hope for us. If you do not believe in even an iota of it, then in God;s point of view, you are already screwed. He can roast your skin, beat your head, drive rods through your face, and pour molten brass down your throat, all for not believing in things you had plenty of reason to doubt. FOR EVER, by the way. That is 700 billion years, times 900 billion years, plus another 700 billion, and another, times a million, plus another hundred billion, times another, and another, and another...you get the idea. Actually, no you do not. You can not. It is insane.

I am absolutely certain that a being of this magnitude of insanity is NOT the most merciful God of the universe. He does not exist. You can stop worrying about it and get on with the rest of your life.




I can echo those here who say they would not want to wear any form of hijab, no matter how mild, because of how it blatantly associates the wearer with Islam. As I was working through my doubts before actually leaving Islam, this was one of the things I struggled with. Having been living in an Islamic country at the time, though, I could not have removed it without making serious waves at work and within my social circle.

I was still living there when I finally did leave Islam. At that point, I did not dare remove it. I feared it would have meant not only losing my social circle, but risking my freedom and possibly my life if it led to the people around me discovering the truth about my apostasy. And so I continued to wear it for the longest four months of my life until I was able to leave the country.

A few weeks before I was to leave, I was contemplating how and when, if ever, I would tell my closest Muslim friends that I could no longer believe. I decided I could do a test run to see how they would react by admitting that I had thoughts of removing the hijab. Just as I suspected, they reacted with pretty much an intervention, and begged me to reconsider. One friend hastily forwarded a few links about hijab in an attempt to convince me it was obligatory. In her haste, she did not realize one of the links she sent me actually argued against the necessity of hijab. When I pointed it out, she frantically apologized, and proceeded to fling quote after quote from Quran, hadith, and various scholars in an attempt to prove that hijab is required, and then bullied me into obeying with statements like, {{Please remember, that any hadith is sunnah.  And we must follow the sunnah also.}}

With just days left in the country, I assured them they had convinced me and I would keep the hijab. They seemed satisfied.

On the day I finally left, I was wearing a long skirt and a thin t-shirt under a flowing black abaya with a black hijab wrapped lightly but securely around my head. I boarded the plane and sat quietly, anxiously yet nervously awaiting my stop in Amsterdam. I felt fine in my abaya and hijab. I knew by then how to wear them comfortably, so I was not physically bothered. But I was acutely aware of everyone who looked at me. {{I am on the plane now, I am home free. I do not have to wear this anymore. Can they tell? Do they see the real me under these shrouds?}} Because I could feel it sharply.

As soon as I arrived in Amsterdam, I headed straight for the restroom. My palms were sweaty and my heart was racing in anticipation of what I was about to do. I was a little shaky standing in the stall as I removed each piece one at a time, folding carefully so they would take up the least amount of room in my bag. I put on the jeans and tank top I had carried with me, and then I hesitated. This was it. The end of the old me.

I was about to have full possession of my freedom.

Even more acutely aware of every glance, I stepped out of the restroom. I had gone in quiet, somber, and shrouded. I came out tall, fresh, alive. Had anyone noticed? It did not matter. The air on my skin gave me goosebumps to the core and I gained confidence with every step. Before I knew it, the hijab was behind me. And I have not looked back.

Council of ex-Muslims of Britain (RSS feed)

Losing their religion: the hidden crisis of faith among Britain’s young Muslims, The Observer, 17 May 2015
Maryam Namazie joins BBC Big Questions on whether human rights laws have achieved more than religion for humankind, 10 May 2015
Read full post...
Join us for appetisers, drinks, music, speeches and laughs to celebrate the CEMB’s 8th anniversary Saturday 20 June 2015, 1500-1800 Hours in central London. Speakers and acts include: Philosopher A C Grayling Singer Alya Marquardt Secular activist Aliyah Saleem Ex-Muslims North Founder Behzad Sandbad London Black Atheists Clive Aruede and Lola Tinubu Bread and Roses TV Host Fariborz Pooya Centre for Secular Space Director Gita Sahgal Council of Ex-Muslims of Morocco Founder Imad Iddine Habib FEMEN Leader Inna Shevchenko Comedian Kate Smurthwaite Author Kenan Malik Women's Rights Activist Magdulien Abaida Maajid Nawaz, Founder of Quilliam Foundation CEMB Spokesperson Maryam Namazie Master Magician Neil Edwards Southall Black Sisters Director Pragna Patel Nari Diganta Activist Rumana Hashem National Secular Society President Terry Sanderson Tickets: £18 (waged); £10 (unwaged)
Read full post...
Islam: Losing my religion, The Economist, 9 May 2015
As you know, the Council of Ex-Muslims of Britain was established in 2007 to break the taboo that comes with leaving Islam and religion. We have done this by challenging apostasy and blasphemy laws and facilitating a public renunciation of Islam and a rise in atheism. We have also been there for many ex-Muslims facing persecution by Islamists or family members - around 300 a year – including one-on-one support. Our web-forum has given thousands a network to rely on, including threads in Arabic and Urdu. The ex-Muslim movement has grown tremendously since our establishment with affiliated councils in a number of countries such as France, Turkey and Morocco. The CEMB’s campaigning work (with One Law for All and other allies) is also finally paying off. Atheism has been recognised in Britain as a grounds for asylum with legal decisions no longer guided by whether the apostasy can be kept private. Also, the Law Society has withdrawn its discriminatory Guidance on Sharia wills and Universities UK has taken back its guidance endorsing gender segregation. Sharia courts are now being scrutinised after many years of silence and appeasement.
Read full post...
Censorship: the real Islamophobia on campus, Spiked, 1 May 2015
29 September 2015 Leicester, UK Maryam will be speaking at an event as part of the Everybody's Reading festival. More details to follow.
Read full post...
8 July 2015 Sutton, UK Maryam Namazie will be speaking at an event organised by Sutton Humanists. More details on their website.
4135696_1428760585.3251"Esha" a 24 year old woman has been cut off from the world in her prime and is languishing in a Pakistani prison for the last three years on false charges of blasphemy brought against her by her best friend after they had an argument. She stands accused of having torn pages from the Qur'an and having slept on them. Although there have been several hearings, her trial is still pending for a complex variety of reasons - one of them being that there have been five different judges, each fearing for his life. Blasphemy is a serious offence in a deeply religious country like Pakistan and punishable by death. Blasphemy laws have been used to persecute minorities like the Christians or to settle personal scores. Several prominent people have been killed for supporting those accused of blasphemy. Only recently a Christian couple were burnt alive for allegedly desecrating the Qur'an. Please donate towards a Save Esha Fund as generously as you can. The money will be used to pay legal fees and welfare costs.
Read full post...
22-24 May 2015 International Atheist Convention “Give Peace A Chance -Secularization and global conflicts”, Cologne, Germany Maryam Namazie will be speaking at the conference. More details here.

Links to other sites